Qty:1
The Angola 3: Black Panth... has been added to your Cart

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation


List Price: $18.98
Price: $14.29 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $4.69 (25%)
Only 2 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
15 new from $10.84 2 used from $18.77
Amazon Price New from Used from
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$14.29
$10.84 $18.77


Frequently Bought Together

The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation + Serving Life
Price for both: $22.28

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Mumia Abu-Jamal, Scott Crow, Ann Harkness
  • Directors: Jimmy O'Halligan
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: PM Press
  • DVD Release Date: September 2, 2008
  • Run Time: 109 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001BWYT4O
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #222,709 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation tells the gripping story of Robert King , Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox, men who have endured solitary confinement longer then any known living prisoner in the United States. Politicized through contact with the Black Panther Party while inside Louisiana s prisons, they formed one of the only prison Panther chapters in history and worked to organize other prisoners into a movement for the right to live like human beings. This feature length movie explores their extraordinary struggle for justice while incarcerated in Angola, a former slave plantation where institutionalized rape and murder made it known as one of the most brutal and racist prisons in the United States. The analysis of the Angola 3 s political work, and the criminal cases used to isolate and silence them, occurs within the context of the widespread COINTELPRO being carried out in the 1960 s and 70 s by the FBI and state law enforcement against militant voices for change.

In a partial victory, the courts exonerated Robert King of the original charges and released him in 2001; he continues the fight for the freedom of his two brothers. The ongoing campaign, which includes a civil case soon to come before the Supreme Court, is supported by people and organizations such as Amnesty International, the A.C.L.U., Harry Belafonte, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield of Ben and Jerry s Ice Cream, Ramsey Clark, Sen. John Conyers, Sister Helen Prejean, (the late) Anita Roddick, Bishop Desmond Tutu and the ANC. Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox have now endured as political prisoners in solitary confinement for over thirty-five years.

Narrated by Mumia Abu-Jamal, The Angola 3features interviews with former Panthers, political prisoners and revolutionaries, including the Angola 3 themselves, and Bo Brown, Geronimo (ji Jaga) Pratt, Malik Rahim, Yuri Kochiyama, David Hilliard, Rod Coronado, Noelle Hanrahan, Kiilu Nyasha, Marion Brown, Luis Talamantez, Gail Shaw and many others. Portions of the proceeds go to support the Angola 3.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By maple syrup on December 15, 2008
This documentary tells a complicated story of three prisoners and their plights in Louisiana prison.
Their stories are very complicated and much background detail is covered in this film. It looks like some (or all of it) was shot before Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The film definitely shows extensive evidence of some kind of prison or government frame up to solve a brutal crime that happened behind prison walls. I would recommend this film for people interested in the Black Panther Party, the American prison system failures, and compelling biographies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ann Garrison on October 14, 2013
I've watched this twice since Herman Wallace's release on October 2nd and death on October 4th. Powerful film with important historical context. I clipped the audio of Herman reciting a poem he wrote for the KPFA Radio News on his memorial service and funeral.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Colin OH on August 5, 2008
First off, it is PM Press that is putting this out. This is a story that needs to be told, see it, show it to others, talk.
I think it is important that more people see the living history of the struggle. These are not just names in a book, mere statistics. These are real individuals in resistance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By anthony c burns on October 18, 2014
Great documentary!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 10 people found the following review helpful By upnort on November 21, 2010
Verified Purchase
This "documentary" was highly selective in the material chosen to represent and reinforce the producer's predetermined conclusions. Having been to Angola numerous times to visit inmates, it is obvious to me that the producers of this film have a very negative agenda that does not mirror the reality of today's Angola. Injustice exists, to be sure, but the vast conspiracy mentality is indefensible. Broad strokes were used to paint a very negative and false portrayal of the warden and the institution. A waste of time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in