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The Animals of Grandfather Mountain: An Animal Caretaker's Tales Paperback – August 21, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (August 21, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463715862
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463715861
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 7.9 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,953,820 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

L. L. Mitchell always knew she wanted to work with animals. She obtained a degree in wildlife biology from Auburn University and landed her first job caring for animals at the City of Montgomery Zoo in Montgomery, Alabama. She served as animal habitat manager at Grandfather Mountain in Linville, North Carolina from 1996 to 2000. As the manager of the Mildred the Bear Environmental Habitats, Mitchell realized how visitors were enthralled with her job caring for the animals. This book gives a glimpse of her daily life in the habitats. Read here an assortment of tales about the feisty bear cubs, wary eagles, playful otters, graceful deer and elusive cougars which call Grandfather Mountain home.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Laurie Mitchell came to Grandfather Mountain as a graduate of Auburn University with a degree in Wildlife Biology, and previous experience working with animals at the Montgomery Zoo in Alabama. She left Grandfather Mountain with a wide circle of new friends, and genuine love for bears, deer, cougars, eagles and otters. She also acquired a husband who changed her name to Laurie Jakobsen. Her story could be the basis for a television or Hollywood production, but if that happens it will have to be later; for now she has authored an engaging book that is our pleasure to read.

The environmental habitats for native animals at Grandfather that Laurie gave such tender love and care are a real challenge. They are larger than the habitats in some of the nation's best known zoos, and this happily gives Grandfather's animals plenty of space for their homes. On the down side, the particularly private animals like Cougars sometimes are out of view of the Grandfather Mountain visitors. Some may say that rocket science is more involved and difficult. We maintain that the skill and psychology shown by Laurie and her staff in caring for the animals, yet always remembering the pleasure of the visitors by working to assure that they see what they came to see, takes talent and dedication that compares with any profession.

The habitats at Grandfather Mountain will always be named for Mildred the Bear, the nicest bear that has ever been. When Grandfather agreed to obtain two bears to be released in the wild to help rebuild the bear population in the mountains, by mistake the Atlanta Zoo sold Grandfather a young bear that the office staff at the zoo had raised on a bottle. Consequently, when that young bear was released, she did not revert to the wild. She did not know she was a bear. She had none of the hostility sometimes associated with bears; she just wanted to hang out with people. She was given the name Mildred.

Faced with the problem of providing a home for a friendly bear that would not turn wild, Grandfather Mountain obtained the expert advice of Bill Hoff, then Director of the North Carolina Zoo at Asheboro, and J. Hyatt Hammond, the architect who had done much of the design work for the state zoo. Taking full advantage of the natural terrain, Hoff and Hammond designed the original habitat that nestles between giant boulders. We have been told time and again that what they designed is the best display for Black Bears in the world. Hammond's architectural firm later designed the building that houses the Grandfather Mountain Nature Museum.

Habitats for White-Tailed Deer, Cougars (also known as Panthers and Mountain Lions), Bald Eagles, Golden Eagles, and River Otters followed. A habitat for bear cubs was also needed, because the only animal friend a cub has in the world is its own mother. Laurie Mitchell Jakobsen was given a free hand to select her own staff for the habitats, and that she did her job well was obvious to anyone who viewed the habitats. The area was always neat. The animals were being fed the best known diets for their respective species. If any animal appeared under the weather, it received immediate attention from veterinarians who were always on call. Laurie's book, as well as the immaculately kept habitats, is proof that a remarkable lady loved her job. - Hugh Morton --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

L. L. Mitchell obtained a degree in wildlife biology from Auburn University and landed her first job at the City of Montgomery Zoo in Montgomery, Alabama. Later she served as animal habitat manager at Grandfather Mountain in Linville, North Carolina from 1996 to 2000. As the manager of Mildred the Bear Animal Habitat at Grandfather Mountain, Mitchell realized how visitors were enthralled with her job caring for the animals. Her first book, "The Animals of Grandfather Mountain", was published by Parkway Publishers in 2001 under the name Laurie Mitchell Jakobsen. She published a revised edition of the book in 2011 entitled "The Animals of Grandfather Mountain: An Animal Caretaker's Tales". She now lives in Wyoming with her two horses, three dogs and husband near Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and is pursuing a career in writing. When she isn't writing, she is training her Tennessee Walking Horse, Quite a Sugarfoot, and competing in the American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC). The two are doing great in a sport where the majority of horses are Arabians.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Reading "The Animals of Grandfather Mountain" was great fun from start to finish. I laughed out loud at some of Jakobsen's stories about day to day life running a wild animal habitat. Everyone, young and old, enjoys watching our furry friends while strolling through zoos. But this book shows you the behind-the-scenes work that makes such experiences possible. But perhaps the biggest treat the books gives readers is insight into the great personalities these animals have. The photographs make the book even more fun. I recommend this book to children and anyone who loves animals, whether they have visited Grandfather Mountain or not.
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Format: Paperback
In The Animals Of Grandfather Mountain, wildlife biologist and animal habitat manager Laurie Jakobsen showcases a wonderfully illustrated collection of engaging and informative stories about the boisterous bear cubs, inquisitive deer, secretive cougars, playful otters, chattering eagles, and others who live in the Grandfather Mountain wildlife habitats of North Carolina. The Animals Of Grandfather Mountain is wonderful reading for children of all ages and an enthusiastically recommended addition to school and community library wildlife reference collections and reading lists.
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Format: Paperback
This book is fun to read. For those who work with animals everyday, it hits home and brings numerous smiles. The kids will hardly believe these stories are true!
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By A Customer on December 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful book for the young and the young at heart who are interested in animals and love to laugh and learn.
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