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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thrilling story; serious themes
Conrad Buff was born in Switzerland in 1886, studied art in his native country and in Germany, them emigrated to the United States in 1904, settling in Los
Angeles, where he became a noted landscape artist. Along with his wife Mary, he coauthored/illustrated a number of children's book, among them this Newberry
Honor winner, which recounts the legend of the...
Published on May 17, 2002 by Orrin C. Judd

versus
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars TLBTerrace
I like this book a little. It is about a man trying to shoot an apple of his son's head with an arrow, but if he did not make it he and his son will DIE. Read this story and find out more. I like the story a little because it is kind of scary when he has to shoot the apple and he and his son might die.
Published on April 7, 2010


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thrilling story; serious themes, May 17, 2002
Conrad Buff was born in Switzerland in 1886, studied art in his native country and in Germany, them emigrated to the United States in 1904, settling in Los
Angeles, where he became a noted landscape artist. Along with his wife Mary, he coauthored/illustrated a number of children's book, among them this Newberry
Honor winner, which recounts the legend of the Swiss hero, William Tell.
The story is simply told, from the perspective of twelve year old Walter, who has the famous apple shot off his head. In 1290, the good king Rudolph has died; leader
of Germany, Austria, and the cantons of Uri, Schwyz, and Underwalden, he collected taxes yearly but otherwise left the stubborn and independent mountain people
of Uri alone. But his son Albrecht rules with a harder hand, and his deputy, Gessler, who is building a permanent castle at Altdorf, is particularly despised. William
Tell is part of a group, eleven men from each canton, who plan to revolt in 1291, but events get ahead of him when he and Walter travel to Altdorf. There, Gessler's
henchmen have placed a nobleman's feathered cap upon a tall pole and require the men of Uri to bow to it, which William refuses to do, setting in motion the train
of events that bring honor to his name even seven hundred years later.
This is a thrilling story of "one man's revolt against tyranny", with serious themes of independence and freedom and responsibility. Kids, especially boys, will love it
and even parents will learn from it.
GRADE : A
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Helps understand fighting for freedom, October 11, 2007
This review is from: The Apple and the Arrow (Paperback)
I just finished reading this book to my 5-year-old daughter as part of her homeschool curriculum. We were assigned to read portions each day and often she would beg, "Please, just a little more!" I hated to put it down, too.

A Newberry winner, the story is well written and powerful. It develops the tale of William Tell from the perspective of his son, Walter, from whose head he shot the infamous apple.

What I most appreciate is that the story helps children understand freedom, and why people would risk their lives to fight for it. (William Tell is the legendary hero of the fight for freedom of what is now Switzerland.)

When my daughter asked, "Why do people have wars?" I struggled with the right words to answer her question. Then this book showed up on our reading list. "The Apple and the Arrow" managed to explain the concept of fighting for freedom in a page-turning, enjoyable way.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Apple and the Arrow, June 11, 2003
A Kid's Review
I really liked this book.This book is about a cruel noble named Gessler, a bowman named William Tell and his son Walter. Gessler didn't believe William tell was as good as a bowman as everybody said he was. So Gessler tied Walter to a tree and put an apple on Walter's head.William Tell had to shoot it with his crossbow. I won't tell you any more you'll have to read, The Apple and the Arrow to find out the rest.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful short story, March 11, 2000
By A Customer
This is a short novella about William Tell and his son Walter Tell during the Swiss fight for independence. Historical accuracy aside, it is a thrilling story told simply and well with a good eye for detail and setting. I love the illustrations in this book too.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars more than an overture, May 12, 2002
Conrad Buff was born in Switzerland in 1886, studied art in his native country and in Germany, them emigrated to the United States in 1904, settling
in Los Angeles, where he became a noted landscape artist. Along with his wife Mary, he coauthored/illustrated a number of children's book, among
them this Newberry Honor winner, which recounts the legend of the Swiss hero, William Tell.
The story is simply told, from the perspective of twelve year old Walter, who has the famous apple shot off his head. In 1290, the good king Rudolph
has died; leader of Germany, Austria, and the cantons of Uri, Schwyz, and Underwalden, he collected taxes yearly but otherwise left the stubborn and
independent mountain people of Uri alone. But his son Albrecht rules with a harder hand, and his deputy, Gessler, who is building a permanent castle
at Altdorf, is particularly despised. William Tell is part of a group, eleven men from each canton, who plan to revolt in 1291, but events get ahead of
him when he and Walter travel to Altdorf. There, Gessler's henchmen have placed a nobleman's feathered cap upon a tall pole and require the men of
Uri to bow to it, which William refuses to do, setting in motion the train of events that bring honor to his name even seven hundred years later.
This is a thrilling story of "one man's revolt against tyranny", with serious themes of independence and freedom and responsibility. Kids, especially
boys, will love it and even parents will learn from it.
GRADE : A
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Apple and the Arrow, May 20, 2004
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Apple and the Arrow (Paperback)
The Apple and the Arrow is about an eleven-year-old boy named Walter Tell. He awaits the skillful demonstration of his father William, a Swiss freedom fighter, who will shoot an apple from his head, "Shoot, father, shoot! I am not afraid says Walter". Walter's voice seemed to bring back his father's courage. Walter's father quickly raised the heavy crossbow to his shoulder as muscles rippled on his brown arms. He sighted the apple on his son's head. He pulled back the bowstring...
The legend of William Tell survived for more than seven hundred years. The Apple and the Arrow, winner of a 1952 Honor Medal, tells the story through Walter's eyes, as he and his father struggle for the freedom of their family, their village, and their country.
I recommend The Apple and the Arrow as a nighttime story for kids of any age. Although it is a little bit on the long side is goes by pretty quickly.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome BUT..., April 20, 2011
By 
Debra (Rochester, NY, United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Apple and the Arrow (Paperback)
I absolutely loved this story. If you are looking at it as part of the Sonlight Curriculum however, I would encourage you to read it first. I was screening it for my 4 year old and sincerely believe it's totally inappropriate for that age group. At least my sensitive daughter does not need to be afraid that things like that will happen in her own life. It is recommended for ages 9-12 in the description, but for those of you using Sonlight it is in the Kindergarten Curriculum as a read aloud. Anyone else considering it should just be aware that it has some themes that are not appropriate for young children (e.g. killing people).

Having said that, it's beautifully written and I couldn't put it down. I appreciated the historical nature of it. Honestly I had no idea who William Tell was (other than the famous apple and arrow part of the story) and it was very informative, assuming that the historical information is accurate. Overall a great book, especially for boys. I look forward to reading it to my children when they are older.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars liberty and tyranny, April 25, 2011
This review is from: The Apple and the Arrow (Paperback)
This is a long version of the William Tell story, and it makes an excellent adventure for boys. My little guys loved "William Tell" by Leonard Everett Fisher, and Mary and Conrad Buff make the story into a novel for boys.

Newbery Award winner from 1951 - hunting and fighting and praying and imprisonment and captivity and the brutality of arbitrary government. Revolution against tyranny. Great pencil sketch illustrations; some color illustrations. Lovely book.

I'm guessing in 1951, it was Newbery-worthy and edgy to imagine a world of petty tyrants insisting people respect their authori-TAY. Welcome to 2011.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Apple and the Arrow, June 14, 2010
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This review is from: Apple & Arrow (Paperback)
This is a delightful easy reader that brings history to life. I originally bought it because it was on the curriculum list that I was using for my K but I found all 4 of my children enjoying it! Easy read aloud. Great flow. Story comes to life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars resonates in the hearts of all who love freedom, April 28, 2013
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This review is from: The Apple and the Arrow (Paperback)
It is the year 1290 and eleven-soon-to-be-twelve-year-old Walter Tell lives happily in the remote heights of the Swiss Alpine Mountains near the village of Burglen with his father William, who is known as the greatest bowman in the canton of Uri and perhaps even in the nearby cantons of Schwys and Underwalden, his mother Hedwig, his little brother Rudi, and their herd dog Prinz. Nearby also live their friend Marie the herd girl, Brother Klaus the monk, and Grandfather Furst. King Albrecht is the new ruler of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, but unlike his late good father Rudolph he sends cruel bailiffs like Gessler to live at nearby Altdorf and oppress the people.

William Tell is one of 33 men who have met secretly at Rootli to formulate a plan to secure their freedom at the beginning of 1291. But it appears that Gessler suspects something. I suppose that nearly everyone has heard the story of how William and Walter go to Altdorf to sell furs. Tell refuses to bow down to Gessler's cap which has been put on a pole in the middle of the town. Gessler is so angry that he punishes Tell by commanding him to shoot an apple off the head of his son. If he misses, both will die. But do you know "the rest of the story"? The legend of William Tell has survived for more than 700 years. Exactly how much of it is true and how much is fiction perhaps no one knows. But it is certainly a stirring account that resonates in the hearts of all people who love freedom and oppose tyranny.

Told simply and well with a good eye for detail and setting from the viewpoint of young Walter, The Apple and the Arrow, which won a Newbery Honor Award in 1952, was first recommended to me in the catalogue of Love to Learn, a homeschool resource center. One reference to drinking wine occurs, but there is a great deal of emphasis on looking to God for guidance and trusting in Him. With its serious themes of independence and responsibility, it will appeal to both children, especially boys, and their parents. Conrad Buff was born in Switzerland in 1886, studied art in his native country and Germany, them emigrated to the United States in 1904, settling in Los Angeles, where he became a noted landscape artist. Along with his wife Mary, he coauthored and illustrated a number of children's books. Another Newbery Honor book (1931) which recounts the same events is Mountains Are Free by Julia Davis Adams.
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The Apple and the Arrow
The Apple and the Arrow by Mary Buff (Paperback - August 27, 2001)
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