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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Andrew Gteeley does it again
While this book, from the acclaimed Father Andrew Greeley, reads differently from many of the other Blacky Ryan novels, it is obvious that Greeley is in top form. Some readers may find the initial chapters slower going as it is the character devevlopment rather than plot that takes center stage. It doesn't take long, however, for Greeley to work his magic and bring...
Published on December 24, 2008 by Jo L. Morrison

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vulnerability
Andrew Greeley's latest Blackie Ryan novel is titled The Archbishop in Andalusia, and as indicated has Ryan in Spain doing the same sleuthing as he would at home in Chicago. While Blackie is attending a conference, the cardinal of Seville asks him to help prevent the murder of Duchess Doña Teresa Maria. The duchess is emeshed in a dysfunctional family, and has made...
Published on January 3, 2009 by Stephen T. Hopkins


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Andrew Gteeley does it again, December 24, 2008
While this book, from the acclaimed Father Andrew Greeley, reads differently from many of the other Blacky Ryan novels, it is obvious that Greeley is in top form. Some readers may find the initial chapters slower going as it is the character devevlopment rather than plot that takes center stage. It doesn't take long, however, for Greeley to work his magic and bring the reader deeply into modern Spain. The cultural touhes and finely drawn characters meld with a deeply engrossing plot to create a novel on which it is worth spending the next few days.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Father Blackie Conquers Spain, December 5, 2008
Andrew Greeley's beloved character Father Blackie makes his first excursion as an cojuncular in THE ARCHBISHOP IN ANDALUSIA. Neither Greeley or Blackie disappoint for a good swift read with no surprise of character changes. The little invisible man solves the problem of a murder that doesn't happen, but is ignored when tea is served.
The dialogue is snappy with loaded irony and insights into the complex history of the Iberian pennisula's culture as additional benifits.
Just the mystery to have in your bag for a long air flight.
Nash Black, author of HAINTS and WRITING AS A SMALL BUSINESS.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful as usual, December 2, 2008
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Fr. Greeley doesn't disappoint at all in Blackie's first adventure as an Archbishop. The storyline is the predictable Greeley form, but for us Greeley fans, that's a comfortable fit! Fr. Greeley, through the Archbishop, shares wonderful insights into the Catholic church and human nature, as usual. The only thing a wee bit unusual is that this one will keep you more in suspense about what is going on in Chicago while the Archbishop is in Andalusia.

I was thoroughly delighted!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strong writing but more mystery, please, February 26, 2009
Archbishop Blackie Ryan is in Seville, Spain to help the Cardinal there deal with a strange situation. Duchess Teresa, a beautiful widow, is being manipulated and bullied by relatives and supposed fiances (supposed because the relatives claim the right to name fiances even though Spanish law does not allow this). The Cardinal suspects there's enough anger there to provoke murder. Sure enough, Teresa is found with barbituate poisoning, a knife in her abdomen, a gunshot wound to her head, and a locked door.

Blackie has never met a locked door mystery he couldn't unravel and he's sure he knows how the door lock was overcome--exactly who did it, though, is a bit of a mystery. After all, the attempted murder occured just after Donna Teresa promised the relatives the money they desperately need to bail them out of financial difficulties. Surely it's not in their interest that she die.

Author Andrew M. Greeley writes convincingly of the difficulties in the Catholic Church, the love of God, and of the life-affirming nature of the love between man and woman. To a large extent, the mystery itself takes second place to Greeley exploring his understanding of faith (Greeley is a Catholic priest). This, essentially, is both the strength and weakness in the story. From a mystery perspective, there just isn't enough going on here--not enough clues, not enough action, not enough danger. THE ARCHBISHOP IN ANDALUSIA has to be seen as a story in which the mystery serves as a sort of hatrack on which Greeley can hang his thoughts about the world and about God's love. Fans of hardboiled detective fiction probably already know to steer clear of Greeley's mysteries, but ANDALUSIA is more contemplative and slow-moving even than many of the other Blackie Ryan mysteries.

Greeley is a strong writer, involving the reader in the story and opening our eyes to the fascinating, if sometimes horrible, world of Church politics and the eternal battle between those who forgive and those who can only hate.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vulnerability, January 3, 2009
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Andrew Greeley's latest Blackie Ryan novel is titled The Archbishop in Andalusia, and as indicated has Ryan in Spain doing the same sleuthing as he would at home in Chicago. While Blackie is attending a conference, the cardinal of Seville asks him to help prevent the murder of Duchess Doña Teresa Maria. The duchess is emeshed in a dysfunctional family, and has made enemies, leaving her vulnerable to mischief. There's the formula in Blackie Ryan novels: a battle between good and evil; a puzzle for smart Blackie to solve; strong relationships to prevail over evil, and by the end, love conquers all. The sights, sounds and relationships in Spain provide a new twist for Ryan and Greeley fans. The Chicago connection endures, however, since Blackie is accompanied by his nephew, Joseph, and almost-fiancee, Peggy Anne Nolan, and Blackie's sister has asked him nudge this relationship along, which he does in his own way, for sure, for sure. As always, a reader comes away from a Greeley novel feeling good about themselves, other people, and the world.

Rating: Three-star (Recommended)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing Read, February 18, 2009
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Amazon Customer "Opa" (Colorado Rocky Mountains) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I am a frequent reader of Andrew Greeley's novels, yet I found this tale a pleasant surprise. This is not a typical story, there is much less stress on an investigation of a "locked room" crime, and much more on the people.

The Archbishop in Andalusia, set mostly in Seville, Spain, is a story about the adventures of Father John Blackwood Ryan, nicknamed Father Blackie (in this novel Padrecito Negro). Blackie is now Archbishop coadjutor to the Cardinal Archbishop of Chicago.

The mystery in this case is rather simple, and the closed door puzzle is, according to Blackie, easy to solve. Only the motive, why someone would commit the crime, is difficult for our detective priest.

I enjoyed the descriptions of the places Blackie visits. I have never been to Spain, but now can clearly picture Seville and its treasures. Through Blackie's eyes I find southern Spain is very beautiful.

Witnessing conversations the Archbishop has with other characters, especially the women, I see some refreshing spiritual insights.

In line with writings of recent Popes, I learn that erotic passion can be an image of God. This discussion is reminiscent of God is Love by Pope Benedict XVI. In Greeley's interpretation of Benedict XVI, a woman is a sacrament of God. Archbishop Ryan uses these teachings to help heal one of the main characters, Dona Teresa Maria, the Duchess of Seville, who carries many burdens from a life where she has not felt loved.

On judgement of those who commit criminal actions, Blackie says we should leave then to heaven, which has its own standards of mercy and "on the record, doesn't let anyone escape its loving embrace."

Archbishop in Andalusia is not just a mystery or a story, it can also be a pleasant theological study. I recommended the book.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, February 15, 2009
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I am a major fan of Father Greeley (though not a Catholic), but was disappointed with the latest (and likely last) of this "Bishop/Archbishop Blackie" series. It followed the formula, and had some delightful passages, but the central puzzle lacked intrigue, the description of the setting in Andalucia was shallow, and the characters lacked nuance. It's a shame, since Father Greeley's writing has probably ended. The previous book in the series, [ASIN:0765303345 The Bishop in the Old Neighborhood: A Bishop Blackie Ryan Novel] was considerably better in quality.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another great Bishop Blackie story., January 20, 2011
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This review is from: The Archbishop in Andalusia: A Blackie Ryan Novel (Blackie Ryan Novels) (Mass Market Paperback)
I have read the recent books in this series, i.e., "The Bishop . . .": "At Sea" 1997, "and the Three Kings" 1998, "and the Missing L Train" 2000, "and the Beggar Girl of St.Germain 2001, "In the West Wing" 2002, "At the University" 2003, "In the Old Neighborhood" 2005, and "At the Lake". "In Andalusia" 2008, is a great readable story, just as are the others. I hope that Fr. Greeley keeps going for many more years with this series and his other books.
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1.0 out of 5 stars I absolutely LOVE Blackie Ryan!, June 11, 2014
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Julie Failla Earhart (St. Louis, mo United States) - See all my reviews
But try as hard as I can, I just can't get past page 27 in this one... too many characters introduced in those pages...I was so confused
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5.0 out of 5 stars He does it again, April 24, 2014
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It is an awesome book. Father Greeley really understands how most Catholics feel and believe. He is really in touch with the common man especially the Irish. I loved that it was in Spain and changed things up a little bit. I like mysteries and this keeps you nguessing. He knows human nature and offers insight into both secular and cleric views.
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The Archbishop in Andalusia: A Blackie Ryan Novel (Blackie Ryan Novels)
The Archbishop in Andalusia: A Blackie Ryan Novel (Blackie Ryan Novels) by Andrew M. Greeley (Mass Market Paperback - September 29, 2009)
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