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The Architect's Brain: Neuroscience, Creativity, and Architecture Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0470658253 ISBN-10: 0470658258 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (May 6, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470658258
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470658253
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #786,654 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hence these two books from the same publisher and by the same author, Harry Francis Mallgrave, sole writer of the former and co-author with David Goodman of the second book, make a valuable contribution to this growing field of knowledge." (Architectural Review, 1 July 2011)

Review

"A gripping interpretation of how the latest advances in neuroscience enlarge our understanding of architecture from Alberti’s belief that a building is a ‘form of body’ to the computer whose dominance in architecture Mallgrave challenges."  David Watkin, University of Cambridge

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian on May 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book as part of an architecture class and found it extremely dence as it was written as a philosophical and psychological perspective, and by a person who is not an architect. The book covers many subjects, including aesthetics and how and why we find certain architecture to be pleasing, perception or architecture as a multi sensory experience, And more. The first part of the book is a series of famous essays and the authors interpretation and elaboration on their insights. In the end a very dence but interesting book, worth the read for any architect worth his/her Salt.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robson R. Goncalves on March 19, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting book, well written and well organized. However, their target audience is almost exclusively architects. The application of neuroscience to understanding the architecture is insufficient. The major theme of the book is the relationship between the brain and the perception of space in general. The contents of neuroscience and architecture often seems distant, treated separately. Still, worth reading. But it is necessary to complement this work with more knowledge on the impact of space on the brain, including the issue of neuroplasticity.
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