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The Arkadians Hardcover – 1994


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Hardcover, 1994
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Dutton's (1994)
  • ASIN: B006R095FS
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,908,744 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

A great story with lots of character development and fantasy.
See-Far-Ahead
As a new fan of Lloyd Alexander, I have to admit this is one of my favourite books of all time.
Nadia Hutton
Anyone who enjoys a good story will enjoy this one, no matter the age.
Lewis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Joy Kim on August 11, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lloyd Alexander is best know for his Prydain and Westmark series, and justly so. Those two series are complex, engaging, and beautifully written. In comparison, some of his other books have always felt a bit simple to me. I think "The Arkadians" is Alexander's best stand-alone novel. Lucian is a bit like Theo and Taran; Joy-in-the-Dance is rather like Eilonwy and Mickle. It makes the book seem familiar to his long-time readers. There's also a lot "The Arkadians" which is new and lovely -- a kind of magical and enchanted atmosphere that most Alexander fans will love. If you enjoyed your trips to Prydain and Westmark, I think you'll enjoy Arkadia too.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jack Sparrow on June 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
This single book is better than the entire Prydain Chronicles. Whereas the storytelling in the latter series was occasionally clunky and the settings vague, Alexander's hallmark is the nerve-wracking suspense he creates so that the reader just has to finish the book once he starts it.
Alexander is not an author; he is a master storyteller. This book is a collage of various characters telling their own humorous stories threaded together by a common plot of a runaway boy and his talking donkey. The wealth of beautifully crafted characters and the occasionally funny, occasionally sombre plot never fails to sustain the amusement of the reader as Alexander shows off his own skill in the stories of his characters.
This is a highly endearing and delightfully light book that is perfect for bedtime reading - although you probably won't get to sleep until you have turned the last page of the book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I fell in love with Lloyd Alexander's books with The Prydain Chronicles, so when I found out that there were more books of his that I didn't own, I had to get this one. I was not disappointed in the least. The story is a rich blend of Greek Mythology and classic fantasy, and it easily pulled me into the world of Arkadia. The Arkadians is a very fun and easy read. I /highly/ recommend it to all Lloyd Alexander fans and anyone that loves good fantasy.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
I chose to read "The Arkadians" for project for my freshman English class. I found the book a little primary for my age and reading level. The only reason I continued reading the book was because I have a soft spot for that particular time period and I like fantasies. Younger readers may become interested in how the book will end. For older readers, the ending is obvious and predictable, but how the ending comes about will keep these readers interested. Alexander's clever way of resolving things and tying the stories together is genious. The story is about a diverse group of humans and fantastic creatures who journey to see The Lady of the Wild Things, each seeking her help in a different way. On their way, they come across many friendly and not-so-friendly civilizations. Each character they come across tells a story that reveals something about him/herself or about Arcadia. Many of the stories have actual roots in mythology. However, the tales can get a little lengthy and boring. "The Arkadains" is a fantastic odyssey that is much like "The Wizard of Oz." I would recommend it to someone who likes fantasies. I would recommend it to someone younger than me. It would catch the attention of a younger audience more than one of my 15-year-old age group. I'm surpised I found this in my school library. This is the first book I've read by Alexander, but I would be interested in reading some of his other works, too.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Luciano VINE VOICE on April 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
Lucian, a sort of accountant who works in the king's palace, has found out that two of the king's top men are stealing from the kingdom. Fronto is a donkey; he used to be a poet until a foolish mistake caused him to be turned into an animal. He desperately wants to regain human form and he befriends Lucian in his travels away from the kingdom, in the hopes that he will be able to find someone who will be able to change him back into his human form. Joy-in-the-Dance is a priestess who has just foretold a nasty future for the king, and so she needs to leave the area also.

These three characters team up as they all travel to find the Lady of Wild Things, who might be able to help them. At first, Joy-in-the-Dance doesn't trust Lucian--he is connected with the Bear tribe, a group of violent men who have driven all of the priestesses out of the kingdom. But then she begins to see that her stereotype of him may be wrong, and he may be a decent person after all.

As their journey continues, the three travelers have adventures and turn from people who are simply traveling together into real friends.

I liked how the author was able to incorporate little bits of mythology into this story. I liked the character of Joy-in-the-Dance; she was strong and stayed true to herself. I also really liked how the problem with Fronto was resolved.

I didn't like how Joy-in-the-Dance treated Lucian; I ended up feeling sorry for him much of the time.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kat on December 20, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Arkadians was a light hearted look upon usually serious Greek myths. Lloyd Alexander twisted mythical plots, making unusual, but lovable heroes of dense headed Lucian, poet/donkey Fronto, and extreme feminist Joy-in-the-dance. Alexander creates a vivid atmosphere with humorous tales in this quick epic. I also relished the novel's theory on how Greek folklore began. As a fan of Greek mythology, I'd encourage all to read the happier side of the usual legends!
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More About the Author

Few writers have inspired as much affection and interest among readers young and old as Lloyd Alexander. At one point, however, it seemed unlikely that he would ever be a writer at all. His parents could not afford to send him to college. And so when a Philadelphia bank had an opening for a messenger boy, he went to work there. Finally, having saved some money, he quit and went to a local college. Dissatisfied with not having learned enough to be a writer he left at the end of one term. Adventure, he decided was the best way. The United States had already entered World War II. Convinced that here was a chance for real deeds of derring-do, he joined the army -- and was promptly shipped to Texas where he became, in disheartening succession an artilleryman, a cymbal player in the band, an organist in the post chapel, and a first-aid man. At last, he was assigned to a military intelligence center in Maryland. There he trained as a member of a combat team to be parachuted into France to work with the Resistance. "This, to my intense relief, did not happen," says Alexander. Instead, Alexander and his group sailed to Wales to finish their training. This ancient, rough-hewn country, with its castles, mountains, and its own beautiful language made a tremendous impression on him. But not until years later did he realize he had been given a glimpse of another enchanted kingdom. Alexander was sent to Alsace-Lorraine, the Rhineland, and southern Germany. When the war ended, he was assigned to a counterintelligence unit in Paris. Later he was discharged to attend the University of Paris. While a student he met a beautiful Parisian girl, Janine, and they soon married. Life abroad was fascinating, but eventually Alexander longed for home. The young couple went back to Drexel Hill, near Philadelphia, where Alexander wrote novel after novel which publishers unhesitatingly turned down. To earn his living, he worked as a cartoonist, advertising writer, layout artist, and associate editor for a small magazine. It took seven years of constant rejection before his first novel was at last published. During the next ten years, he wrote for adults. And then he began writing for young people.Doing historical research for Time Cat he discovered material on Welsh mythology. The result was The Book of Three and the other chronicles of Prydain, the imaginary kingdom being something like the enchanted land of Wales. In The Remarkable Journey of Prince Jen Alexander explored yet another fantastic world. Evoking an atmosphere of ancient China, this unique multi-layered novel was critically acclaimed as one of his finest works. Trina Schart Hyman illustrated The Fortune-tellers as a Cameroonian folktale sparkling with vibrant images, keen insight and delicious wit. Most of the books have been written in the form of fantasy. But fantasy, Alexander believes, is merely one of many ways to express attitudes and feelings about real people, real human relationships and problems

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