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The Armstrong Lie [Blu-ray]

117 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

In 2009, Academy Award®-winning director Alex Gibney (2007, Best Documentary, Taxi to the Dark Side) was hired to make a film about Lance Armstrong’s comeback to cycling. The project was shelved when the doping scandal erupted, and re-opened after Armstrong’s confession. THE ARMSTRONG LIE picks up in 2013 after Armstrong was stripped of his 7 Tour de France titles, and presents a riveting, insider’s view of the unraveling of the greatest deception in sports history.

Product Details

  • Actors: Lance Armstrong, Reed Albergotti, Betsy Andreu
  • Directors: Alex Gibney
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Chinese, English, French, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: February 11, 2014
  • Digital Copy Expiration Date: December 31, 2017 (Click here for more information)
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00GMV8CQU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #61,904 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 3, 2014
Format: DVD
"The Armstrong Lie" (2013 release; 122 min.), originally intended to document the comeback of Lance Armstrong in 2009 after a 4 year absence from the sport, instead is now the chronicle of the astonishing fall from grace by Armstrong, leading to his lifetime ban and stripping of his 7 Tour de France victories. As the documentary opens, Lance is talking to director Alex Gibney just hours after Lance has confessed the Big Lie on the Oprah Winfrey show on January 14, 2013. The documentary then goes into depth as to how Armstrong was able to get away with the Big Lie for so many years, while also looking back at some of his major accomplishments, most notably his survival of almost fatal testicular cancer that had spread to his lungs and brains in 1996, and his subsequent return to professional biking and winning the Tour de France an unprecedented 7 consecutive times. The documentary also gives insights as to why (and how) Armstrong came back in 2009, and doing an extended one-on-one interview with Armstrong in June of '13 to confront him in depth with all the facts and allegations.

Several comments: first and foremost, more than one person interviewed made this comment: "the doping was bad, but the abuse of power was worse", and "it's not about the doping, it's about the power". Indeed, by now it is well documented that in the 1990s, all of professional biking was immersed by doping, EPO in particular, very similar in the way baseball was immersed by steroids at that time. "A generation of riders used EPO", comments someone. Most of them were caught, but not Armstrong. How? By massive intimidation (some say "bullying") and very advanced doping techniques, as it turns out.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jeena on February 16, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Watching Lance Armstrong justify his use of performance enhancing drugs was interesting and somewhat convincing. His argument boils down to "everybody's doing it, so I'd be a fool (and a loser) not to." But seeing how he lied with such conviction, over and over again, and how he trashed people and wrecked lives, while interesting, was sad and rather depressing, perhaps because we've all had to deal with guys like this at one time or other. It's all about them, and if someone gets in the way, they're regarded as nothing more than road-kill that doesn't even warrant a glance in the rear-view mirror. Armstrong seems like a sociopath, albeit a rich one. He may be banned from competing, but he's made his millions, and this documentary gave me the impression that Mr. Armstrong has no self doubt and no regrets. Yes, this doc is about biking competitions, but it's really a character study. I enjoyed it, although I do think it runs a little bit too long.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Laurence Raw on May 22, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
THE ARMSTRONG LIE is a fascinating documentary. Shot over a period of four years, it purports to investigate the oft-repeated claim that cyclist Lance Armstrong was a cheat, and that every single one of his Tour de France wins were achieved by taking drugs. Alex Gibney's narrative begins as a defense of Armstrong's behavior, but as different elements of the truth emerge, so the filmmaker has to keep readjusting his position. Gibney is obviously a fan of Armstrong (as many people still are), but as the seamy details of what the cyclist did in order to win his races gradually emerge, so the filmmaker gradually understands how wrong-headed he has been give his unquestioning support. Armstrong emerges as a thoroughly unsavory character, pathologically unwilling to acknowledge the truth about himself, and always looking to manipulate the media so that he emerges in a positive light. Even his so-called 'confessional' interview with Oprah looks like a deliberate attempt to rescue his reputation. As the narrative unfolds, so Gibney gradually comes to understand the truth about his subject, and realizes to his cost that much of the film has unwittingly helped to obfuscate that truth, portraying Armstrong instead as a man more sinned against than sinning. It is only right at the end that Gibney admits the truth of Armstrong's motives, and how Armstrong himself has deliberately duped the filmmaker. As a result THE ARMSTRONG LIE is a film that is more about media manipulation than anything else, revealing just how persuasive - and dangerous - a person Armstrong actually is. There's no guarantee that he might not manage to clear his reputation in the future, despite what he has done.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Grace Greenwood on July 26, 2014
Format: DVD
This movie was well documented, thorough, and well organized in how it presented the information to make their case. The only thing that bothers me is the way everyone keeps saying Lance Armstrong destroyed the sport of cycling. The sport destroyed itself, Lance Armstrong was just a major player and made the lie so big it could not be contained. Corruption ran from the head of the cycling organization right down to the people who filled water bottles and got towels for the racers. They all knew. Many of the people calling for Armstrong's head were themselves either cheaters or the spouse of a cheater who had been caught and punished. Only after being caught did these people speak out again Armstrong and they seemed more determined to get Lance for his ruthless attach against his accusers than they seemed to be concerned with trying to clean up the sport in general. As I watched this movie it seemed as though all of them were inside some little bubble of self deception that none of them seemed to recognized. One thing is clear, no matter what Armstrong says or does for the rest of his life, no one will believe him. Example, even when he confessed, people still claimed at least part of what he was saying was a lie.
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The Armstrong Lie [Blu-ray]
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