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The Art Of Computer Game Design: Reflections Of A Master Game Designer Paperback – January 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 113 pages
  • Publisher: Osborne/McGraw-Hill (1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881341177
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881341171
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.3 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,229,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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More About the Author

Chris Crawford earned a Master of Science degree in Physics from the University of Missouri in 1975. After teaching physics for several years, he joined Atari as a game designer in 1979. There he created a number of games: Energy Czar, an educational simulation about the energy crisis, Scram, a nuclear power plant simulation, Eastern Front (1941), a wargame, Gossip, a social interaction game, and Excalibur, an Arthurian game.
Following the collapse of Atari in 1984, Crawford took up the Macintosh. He created Balance of Power, a game about diplomacy, Patton Versus Rommel, a wargame, Trust & Betrayal, a social interaction game, Balance of the Planet, an environmental simulation game, and Patton Strikes Back, a wargame. In 1992, Crawford decided to leave game design and concentrate his energies on interactive storytelling, a field that he believed would become important. He created a major technology for interactive storytelling systems, patenting it in 1997. He is now commercializing his technology at his company website at storytron.com.
Crawford has written five published books: The Art of Computer Game Design, now recognized as a classic in the field, in 1982; Balance of Power (the book) in 1986; The Art of Interactive Design in 2002; Chris Crawford on Game Design in 2003; and Chris Crawford on Interactive Storytelling in 2004.
He created the first periodical on game design, the Journal of Computer Game Design, in 1987. He founded and served as Chairman of the Computer Game Developers' Conference, now known as the Game Developers' Conference.
Crawford has given hundreds of lectures at conferences and universities around the world, and published dozens of magazine articles and academic papers.
Crawford served as computer system designer and observer for the 1999 and 2002 NASA Leonid MAC airborne missions; he also has done some analysis of the resulting data. He lives in southern Oregon with his wife, 3 dogs, 7 cats, 2 ducks, and 3 burros.
His current work is in interactive storytelling. After seventeen years of work, Crawford's company, Storytron, is releasing its technology to the public at www.storytron.com.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Lam, Ho Cheong on September 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
As written in the early eighties, this book is one of the pioneer works seriously about video game. It talks about such topics as what is a game, why people play games, and how to design a game. The author's rich and plentiful experience in game design is undeniable, but the arguments in the book are somewhat restricted only to his own personal opinions. To a certain extent, there is no ground, as backed up from careful research, to justify these claims. Either, the author has not been able to connect his viewpoints to the works of other people. Whether other designers have similar beliefs, thus supporting his arguments? Even though similar works on game design may hardly be found at the time, relating to the experiences transferable from other disciplines is possible. Despite this, as a whole, the author does throw some light on the area, which is enough to make this book well worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Smith on March 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved the book! It taught me a lot. I'm learning game design. It is a great book for beginner to advanced game designers. I'd suggest it.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By pnrsmith@istar.ca on December 9, 1997
Format: Paperback
Ever since I played Chris Crawford's "Balance of the Planet" I have been a fan of his. In this book he describes in detail what goes into the game design including many examples from his own experience. The biggest problems with this book are that it is some what dated, and I wish it was thicker. Richard W. Smith
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2 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Gamer on June 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I had a course from this guy at Digpen.edu and he forced us to buy this book for his course. I could only stomach the first couple chapters. He made a couple games in the 80's and has nothing relevant to say about the games of today.
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