Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $3.79 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Used book in very good condition. This book contains no highlighting or writing. Thank you for looking at this book.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Art of Fiction: Illustrated from Classic and Modern Texts Paperback – July 1, 1994

ISBN-13: 978-0140174922 ISBN-10: 0140174923

Buy New
Price: $12.21
52 New from $6.48 98 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.21
$6.48 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student




Frequently Bought Together

The Art of Fiction: Illustrated from Classic and Modern Texts + Wuthering Heights (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price for both: $16.26

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (July 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140174923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140174922
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,844 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

British novelist Lodge ( Paradise News ) retired in 1987 from Birmingham University's English faculty and swore off academic prose, but in 1991 he consented to contribute a series of columns "of interest to a more general reading public" to the London Independent . Each of these 50 essays begins with a brief fiction passage, addressed and interpreted topically by Lodge, who discusses point of view, the unreliable narrator, "the uncanny," "weather" and other aspects of writing. For example, in Chapter 19, "Repetition," he observes that while Hemingway is famous for the "charged simplicity" of his reiterated words or phrases, repetition brings a special flavor to the work of writers as various as Dickens, Lawrence and Martin Amis--and he proves it. The selections are varied, although perhaps slanted to favor gentility (Austen and Nabokov, not Meredith or Dreiser), and tend to verify the opinion that "the novel has always been centrally concerned with erotic attraction and desire." Lodge may be working a bit below full capacity here, but apart from serving as a genial companion, he defines terms of the novelist's craft so deftly and concisely that this pleasurable browse could rescue (or replace) many a college syllabus.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Exciting...a book for starting up trains of thought or discussion... It did make me think, as a writer, as a reader, as a teacher" -- AS Byatt Sunday Times "Here is scholarship made human... There has been no better populist study of fiction since Forster's Aspects of the Novel" Financial Times "It is wonderful to be clued in to some of the magic tricks of the trade; the point of view, the stream of consciousness, the use of names, the sense of place, time-shift and intertextuality" Los Angeles Times "Lodge has the knack of wearing his scholarship lightly... One finds here precisely that expansive, humane wisdom which is so sorely lacking in much narrow-minded modern criticism... He gets to the bottom of things, telling us why we read fiction...admirers will find in The Art of Fiction concentrated essence of Lodge" Guardian "These essays are as fresh and as readable as ever" -- David Evans Independent --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
7
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
David Lodge is entertaining and illuminating.
Neil Fiore
I recommend this book for anyone who loves literature and wants to add more depth to their reading experience.
popjunkie
This knowledge is imparted in a very literary style , enjoyable, interesting and informative to read.
ann marie o'brien moran

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By popjunkie on December 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
I purchased "The Art of Fiction" as a companion to other reading materials required for a class on Modern American Fiction. This is, as others have described, fairly lightweight in its language and/or depth of treatment. However, this is the book I use most often as a guide when writing short papers & essays. David Lodge is a master at clear and concise commentary. His purpose in this collection is to convey specific literary principles in a precise format (many appeared as newspaper columns). The preface states that this book is for people who like literary criticism in "small doses," and this is meant to be "a book to browse in, and dip into." The format is very convenient, as you can read an entire piece on-the-go, during lunch or in a waiting room. (Some examples of "chapters" are The Unreliable Narrator, The Non-Fiction Novel, Time-Shift, Magic Realism, and Metafiction.) I recommend this book for anyone who loves literature and wants to add more depth to their reading experience.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Kelly Cowan on April 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
David Lodge states in his introduction, "This is a book for people who prefer to take their Lit. Crit. in small doses," and this, indeed, is an accurate categorization for Lodge's, The Art of Fiction. This is a collection of articles on various topics of writing that he wrote during a stint with the Washington Post. While more experienced writers may find his fifty topics of writing, ranging from quite literally "Beginning[s]" to "Ending[s]" and some "Metafiction" or "Sense of Place" in between, somewhat elementary in their discussion, a beginning writer may find his book more useful.

Lodge is a fan of the classics. This is apparent in his choice to begin each chapter with an excerpt from authors such as Henry James, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Ernest Hemingway and James Joyce, though more contemporary authors like Martin Amis and Anthony Burgess are slipped in every so often. And arguably, it was a wise choice of Lodge's to use classics as his examples if the beginning writer is his target audience so as to transmit a sense of what is conventional before launching off into magic realism. But be forewarned-Lodge terms his topics "doses" in the introduction as though implying his discussion will provide some sort of cure to the ailing writer-when, in fact, we all know the writing process does not have solutions or cures that suddenly make it easy to sit down and type away for two hours. Roughly three to four pages are devoted to each topic which give the book, as a whole, the feel of "Learning to Write in Twenty-Four Hours." In Lodge's defense, however, he does provide a quick, concise discussion that will serve as both a quick introduction to the beginner and a quick refresher to the more advanced writer.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Sara McAulay on November 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
I discovered this book 3 or 4 years ago and have read it at least three times -- parts of it more often than that. I use it as one of several texts in creative writing workshops. Lodge's essays are witty, engaging and smart, and the brief excerpts at the beginning of each chapter are wonderful for "mirroring" exercises. My students enjoy the book as much as I do, and all seem to learn quite a bit from it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
"The Art of Fiction", not surprisingly, is a popular title. In addition to this entry by David Lodge, identically entitled works (albeit with different sub-titles after the seemingly ubiquitous colon) are available from John Gardner and Ayn Rand (in her case, one more example I suppose that "art" is in the eye of the beholder). I gather that the Gardner and Rand volumes are along the lines of "how-to" manuals for aspiring writers. Lodge's book, however, is written not for writers but rather for readers, especially intelligent devotees of the novel who are not steeped in academic literary theory.

THE ART OF FICTION is a collection of newspaper columns (revised for this publication) that Lodge originally wrote around 1991 for "The Independent on Sunday" on fifty different literary devices or principles. Each is illustrated with one or more excerpts from classical or modern texts. For example: "Point of View" is illustrated by means of an excerpt from "What Maisie Knew" by Henry James; "Stream of Consciousness" -- "Mrs. Dalloway" by Virginia Woolf; "Introducing a Character" -- "Goodbye to Berlin" by Christopher Isherwood; "Allegory" -- "Erewhon" by Samuel Butler; and "Metafiction" -- "Lost in the Funhouse" by John Barth. The pieces average four-and-a-half pages, so they are easily digested in five to ten minutes.

Lodge's discussion of his various literary topics is well-informed, intelligent, clear and concise. Blessedly, he avoids pedantry. In passing, he offers many brief opinions on matters literary (for example, Henry James is "the first truly modern novelist in the English language," and "the first great surrealist novel in the English language was arguably Alice in Wonderland").
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By janvansas@fcmail.com on July 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book offers a highly digestible introduction to how fiction works and tempts the reader with some great exerpts from (modern) classics. It's also a nice opportunity to look at literature through the eyes of a professional, both at studying and practicing writing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?