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The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories Paperback – March 5, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (March 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393341259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393341256
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #60,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Before the Internet, people were accustomed to storytelling, that basic human impulse to try and make sense of life, as something linear and passive. But the multimedia dynamics of the Internet have changed all that, encouraging participation that often takes control from the creators of the story. Wired contributing editor Rose takes a broad and deep look at how electronic media are changing storytelling, inviting an immersion that drills down beneath surface information and encourages a deeper level of emotional involvement. Rose interviewed movie producers and game developers, including the creative minds behind Avatar and The Sims, to explore innovations in storytelling since the creation of the novel. He provides historical context for the evolution of storytelling from television to the movies, from role-playing games to blogging and tweeting. Creators, in essence, are losing some control of their stories as fans take them over. Star Wars fans maintain a Wookieepedia of detail beyond anything envisioned by its creator, fans of Mad Men began unauthorized tweeting in the role of characters from a show set in the 1960s, and the Potter Wars have erupted over control of the popular series as fans start blogs and websites. Rose asserts that in the new world of immersion storytelling, stories become games, and games become stories. Completely fascinating. --Vanessa Bush --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“A highly readable, deeply engaging account of shifts in the entertainment industry that have paved the way for more expansive, immersive, interactive forms of fun.” (Henry Jenkins)

“An intriguing snapshot of where media will continue to move in the near future—great for rabbit–hole spelunkers.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“Like Marchall McLuhan's groundbreaking 1964 book, Understanding Media, this engrossing study . . . . is an essential read.” (Library Journal)

More About the Author

Frank Rose is the author most recently of The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories, published in the US and the UK by W.W. Norton and hailed by the International Journal of Advertising as "an essential overview" of the fundamental changes affecting media. He has explored this theme as a keynote speaker at such conferences as ad:tech Sydney, Sheffield Doc/Fest, and the Guardian's Changing Media Summit in London, as well as in talks at Google, Lucasfilm, Unilever, and other major companies.

Before writing The Art of Immersion, Frank spent many years reporting on the impact of technology on entertainment, advertising, and society. As a contributing editor at Wired and a contributing writer at Fortune before that, he covered such topics as the making of Avatar, Sony's enormous gamble on the PlayStation 3, and the posthumous career of Philip K. Dick in Hollywood. His articles have also appeared in the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, New York, Esquire, Vanity Fair, Travel + Leisure, and Rolling Stone.

Frank's books have been translated into Dutch, French, German, Japanese, Korean, and Italian. His 1989 best-seller West of Eden, about the ouster of Steve Jobs from Apple, was named one of the ten best books of the year by Businessweek and was recently republished in an updated edition. Among his other books is The Agency, an unauthorized history of the oldest and at one time most successful talent agency in Hollywood. He lives in the East Village of Manhattan, where he got his start covering the punk scene at CBGB for The Village Voice.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Justin Hyde on May 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Rose's new book, The Art of Immersion, provides an interesting behind-the-scenes look into the conception, creation, and promotion of many products of popular media from Christopher Nolan's film The Dark Knight to Xbox's Halo; from George Lucas' Star Wars suite to the Nine Inch Nails' album Year Zero; from ABC's Lost to Evan Williams' sites Blogger and Twitter.

Yet for all of its contemporary pop culture references and social media anecdotes, The Art of Immersion feels quite dated. His thesis ("A new type of narrative is emerging--one that's sold through many media at once in a way that's non-linear, that's participatory and often gamelike, and that's designed above all to be immersive.") is obvious to even the most technologically un-savvy reader. Nearly everyone, from Topeka, Kansas to Tokyo, Japan has understood that intuitively (if not explicitly) for 10 years.

I enjoyed reading the first few chapters in which Rose discusses the transformation of media and the creation of increasingly immersive worlds through the advancement of the technology, content and delivery method of newer forms of media. Rose outlines a rough sketch from the invention of the printing press and moveable type to the advent of the motion picture to the seductive glow of the living room television to the immersive and participatory "deep media" of the Internet. Yet as I continued to read, I kept waiting for the book to "start".

Each new chapter felt like a slight regurgitation of the one before it; each felt like an introduction to the theme, yet the book never fully developed the theme. True to his subtile, Rose answered How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way we Tell Stories. But each chapter begs the questions: WHY?
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Edward Boches on February 14, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"The Internet is trying very, very hard to tell us." That quote is from Elan Lee, one of the early pioneers of Alternate Reality Games. Lee created I Love Bees to promote the Xbox game Halo 2, and was part of the 42 Entertainment team (along with Alex Lieu and Susan Bonds) behind Year Zero, which engaged thousands of Nine Inch Nails fans in the creation of a story around the album of the same name.

The quote above quote appears in Frank Rose's new book, The Art of Immersion, due out in February 2011. Rose, a long time contributing editor at Wired, where he's covered everything from the fall of the music industry to the impact of digital technology on television, offers an assessment of where story-telling is going in an age when narratives are no longer linear and more often than not are told, or at least informed, by the participation of a consumer community.

Rose labels this "deep media." Story-telling that offers an immersive experience. It refers to everything from the online audiences that gathered on their own to decipher the convoluted plot line of Lost, to the MadMen fans who hijacked the show's characters in the form of Twitter personas, playing Don and Betty true to their `60s personas.

To his credit, Rose doesn't simply regurgitate examples of current entertainment and gaming industry campaigns like Avatar or Grand Theft Auto. He frames the challenges and emerging formulas in light of all the story telling changes that have come before, from the serialized novels of Dickens, to the early breakthroughs created by D.W. Griffith that gave film its own identity as a medium, to the trans-media narratives about which Henry Jenkins writes so intelligently.

Multiple themes emerge in Rose's book.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By HP Seaton on March 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I wanted a lot from this book, but didn't get quite enough to satisfy. I was surprised that Mr. Rose had a lot of discussion about various television shows, including 'Lost' and 'The Office', yet not even a mention of a true pioneering web show like 'The Guild'. And can we have a discussion of the digital generation without an in depth examination of The World of Warcraft phenomenon? It gets a one page mention.

I felt at several times that I was being told what was 'cool' in the digital universe. I had hoped for a more careful examination of the art of immersion, less a history lesson on how mainstream media tries to make money off the marriage of old technology and new.

I would, however, recommend this book on the strength of just one chapter, 'Control'. In it Mr. Rose examines piracy and controlling copyright in this digital age. I would go so far as to say that politicians should have to read this chapter before saying one damn word on digital piracy.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Guy L. Gonzalez on February 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The Art of Immersion is a much-needed bridge to/from Henry Jenkins' seminal Convergence Culture, as Frank Rose crafts an engaging, insightful overview of how storytelling has evolved in the digital age that's accessible to all, whether enthusiast or skeptic. Focusing primarily on the intersection of film, TV and gaming, there are plenty of takeaways and insights of interest to writers and publishers, too.

Unlike most transmedia advocates, myself included, Rose focuses on immersion and depth of story, rather than just the primacy of STORY itself, offering a variety of compelling examples. Among them, his contrast between Star Wars and Avatar is on point, and I enjoyed his emphasis on marketing and engagement vs. interruption advertising; it's a key aspect that gets overlooked in most discussions about transmedia.

The final three chapters delve into the science of immersion, with some really interesting info, though Rose's take on Twitter is surprisingly simplistic and disconnected from earlier references in the book. Particularly interesting is the Lanier-ish (You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto (Vintage)) cautionary tone he ends the book on, somewhat surprising coming from one of the Wired crew.

All in all, a great read, and highly recommended.

NOTE: A complimentary copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher, W.W. Norton.
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