Your Music Library
  MP3 cart
The Art Of The Song

The Art Of The Song

July 27, 1999

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music
"Please retry"
$4.99
$4.99
More options
  • Sample this album Title - Artist (sample)
1
30
5:26
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
2
30
7:19
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
3
30
5:32
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
4
30
5:00
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
5
30
4:10
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
6
30
6:20
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
7
30
6:11
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
8
30
4:19
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
9
30
5:11
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
10
30
6:52
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
11
30
4:50
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
12
30
4:02
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
13
30
4:22
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 20, 1999
  • Release Date: July 20, 1999
  • Label: Verve Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Universal Music Jazz France
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:09:34
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000VRSTAK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,696 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 3, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Charlie Haden(bass and vocal)), Shirley Horn(vocals), Bill Henderson(vocals), Ernie Watts(tenor sax), Alan Broadbent(piano and arragements) and Larance Marable(drums, primarily sensitive brush work). This is music at its finest. If you like lyrical, medodic jazz, don't pass up this disk. Shirley Horn creates a spell with magical ballads that ooze perfect phrasing. Bill Henderson sings with a deftness and sensitivity that will take you over. Ernie Watts playing is flawlessly lyrical. Larance Marable's brush work is soft and tasteful. Charlie Haden will move you to tears when you hear him sing the final ballad on this CD. Alan Broadbent has arranged a Rachmaninoff piece for strings, bass...stunning. This is a CD for thoughtful, quiet times - it's beautifully rendered around themes that are timeless. If you want to be moved...if you want to hear music that's wonderfully moving on a number of levels...if you want to hear musical passion, thought and rare jazz genius realized, buy this CD!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 23, 1999
Format: Audio CD
 
Charlie Haden- Quartet West The Art Of The Song (Verve 547403-2)
Now here's a man who is in love with the past. Haden seems to be able to bring out the magic in the songs of the past, predominantly the film musics of the thirties to the fifties. Quartet West (Haden- bass / Alan Broadbent-piano/ Ernie watts-tenor sax / Larance Marable-drums) have been around since about 1986,and have recorded a number of albums to date all of equal beauty and scope. This group pretty much allows Charlie Haden to work with standards and create a late night feel, if you like your jazz this way. On this release he works with Shirley Horn on four tracks, as well as Bill Henderson on four. The group sounds relaxed and laid back, with Ernie Watt's extended sax solos sounding as sweet as ever, while Marable's brush work on drums compliments the material covered. Haden of course is Mr Versatility, with material covered from Rachmaninov to Jerome Kern, Ravel, Jimmy van Heusen, to compositions by Haden himself and pianist Alan Broadbent. The strongest piece here is the beautiful tune by Jerome Kern The Folks Who Live On The Hill, which was originally featured in the film High,Wide and Handsome (1937), with stunning vocals by Horn. This is an intimate recording, with beautiful arrangements and delicate phrasings, and if you're not a stranger to the works of this outfit, then you'll like what you'll hear on this recording. Haden employs a chamber orchestra to accompany him on most number, heightening the emotional content of the pieces. Haden has such a vast history to his name as a bass player, and it's not for me to go over old territory. Just check out his resume in any number of jazz encyclopedias to realize how talented and experienced he really is. Just when I thought I was getting tired of jazz standards performed by quartets, I am reminded how graceful it can all be. As Haden says re this record "Good music lasts forever."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By thejazzcritic on November 19, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The criticisms miss the point. This is an effort that does a rare thing - it brings together men and women who can put the experience of life to judicious use in their art. Unlike listening to the deterioration other performers have faced, in later years, at the hands of studio production teams that no longer know what to do with them, Charlie Haden has found a way to create a beautiful volume of space in which to let the years of these venerated performers shine through. It is in this space you shall hear the notes of lives lived and savored.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 4, 1999
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've loved Haden's other work, and this one is no exception...rich arrangements, soulful vocals... If it had grooves, I'd wear it out.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DXR on April 8, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Sophisticated, elegant...ranging from "supper club" sounds (shirley horne's vocals) to melancholic storytelling (Henderson's ballads) to lush, thematic and original instrumental compositions (Broadbent)...the CD will sound overstated and relentless to some, but for those with an ear for vocal subtlety, impeccable composition and the finer aspects of the art of song, this CD's a must-own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gavin Wilson on May 9, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The outstanding Quartet West album is 'Always Say Goodbye'. On that CD, Broadbent demonstrates his skills at orchestral arrangement, and Haden deftly selects great oldies to intermingle with some of his own superb compositions. Haden also takes some historic performances -- such as Jo Stafford on vocals -- to bring a resonance to the new covers. The experiment was very successful.
You can see the logic behind this subsequent album: instead of using dusty old recordings, why don't we use today's state-of-the-art production to capture the voices of several current artists? And why don't we let Alan orchestrate the whole album?
The trouble is that the orchestration, beautiful though it is throughout, constrains the band terribly. And the vocals swamp the album. (Actually the Jo Stafford track on 'Always Say Goodbye' is one of the weakest on the album.) They say that the saxophone is the instrument closest to the human voice, and it is Ernie Watts who suffers most on this album, The sax is simply crowded out by all the singing. It is only on the stand-out track, 'Prelude en la mineur', an instrumental re-working of a Ravel piece, that Watts finally gets a chance to let rip.
Shirley Horn's vocals are fine, particularly on 'Lonely Town'. But I simply cannot listen to any of the tracks containing Bill Henderson's voice, and sadly, there are four of them.
The most touching song is the last one, where Haden himself bravely takes the vocal lead. It's a song his mother used to sing on the radio, back in the early 1940s, when the entire Haden family would appear on KWTO Springfield. It is a farewell to the dead, and also a reassurance that one day they will meet again.
If you want a quick survey of this CD, check out tracks #1, #9 and #13. It's a long way from the days of Haden's playing with Ornette Coleman and the Liberation Orchestra, and it's very mellow.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?