The Attacking Ocean and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $7.65 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Somewhat worn, but still in Good Condition. Ex-Library Copy with usual stickers and markings.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Attacking Ocean: The Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels Hardcover – June 11, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1608196920 ISBN-10: 1608196925 Edition: 0th

Buy New
Price: $20.35
29 New from $6.00 30 Used from $4.48
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.35
$6.00 $4.48
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Frequently Bought Together

The Attacking Ocean: The Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels + The Great Warming: Climate Change and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations + The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850
Price for all three: $46.68

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Press (June 11, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1608196925
  • ISBN-13: 978-1608196920
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,091,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Given the recent widespread alarms about global warming, any added anxiety on the part of coastline residents about rising sea levels is entirely understandable, especially when most pessimistic scenarios put the extra elevation at three feet by this century’s end. In this fascinating, if occasionally unnerving, overview of the long and tempestuous relationship between shore-hugging cities and their neighboring oceans, best-selling author and anthropology professor Fagan (Beyond the Blue Horizon, 2012) charts coastline measurements as far back as 15,000 years ago, when watery disasters at sparsely settled seaside villages were rare. Today, with major population centers clustering near harbors and beaches, superstorms like last year’s East Coast–ravaging Hurricane Sandy, which Fagan points to as a prime example of modern society’s vulnerability, are far more devastating. In three absorbing, well-crafted sections, the author recounts some notable past storm surges and tsunamis, and predicts likely damages from future ocean-borne disasters. More than just another nervous admonition about climate change, Fagan’s account relies on hard data to warn cities and governments worldwide to act now and forestall otherwise inevitable catastrophic flooding. --Carl Hays

Review

"In The Attacking Ocean, Brian Fagan has written an urgent and compelling narrative of the impact of rising sea levels on human societies.  His brilliant insights, derived from geography, archaeology and history, are the product of a lifetime of scholarly research and deep reflection.  This masterly account’s extraordinary lessons should impel his readers to consider how they may contribute to meeting the challenges of global climatic changes.”—Dr. Andrew M.T. Moore, First Vice President, Archaeological Institute of America, former Dean of Liberal Arts, former Dean of Graduate Studies, Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, Rochester Institute of Technology
 
“Global warming, if not the most researched issue of our time, is the most pressing and persistently discussed. The Attacking Ocean stands out as justifiably alarming, with some 200 million people residing at elevations of less than five meters above sea level.  As the most accomplished and articulate of archaeologists and science writers addressing the many facets of the climate debate, Brian Fagan again critically and without hyperbole states our anticipated future.”—Vernon Scarborough, Charles P. Taft Professor and Distinguished Research Professor, University of Cincinnati and author of The Flow of Power

"A fascinating history of the sea's impact on human societies over the last 15,000 years as sea level rose since the last Ice Age.  Rich in the kind of details that only an archaeologist of Fagan's caliber can bring to the subject, he pays special attention to the increasing vulnerability of societies as they evolved over this same time period."—Bruce Parker, author of The Power of the Sea

“A fascinating, accessible examination of global climate change and the effect of the world’s oceans on human populations over millennia. This thought-provoking work is bound to be popular with readers of Fagan’s previous books as well as those interested in anthropology, archaeology, climate change, and global warming.”—Library Journal


“Fascinating, if occasionally unnerving…More than just another nervous admonition about climate change, Fagan’s account relies on hard data to warn cities and governments worldwide to act now and forestall otherwise inevitable catastrophic flooding.”—Booklist

“The author’s vision and knowledge substantiate his clearly expressed concerns.”—Kirkus Reviews

“In The Attacking Ocean, Brian Fagan provides—miraculously in a mere six paragraphs—the best description yet of Hurricane Sandy, the super-storm that blasted coastal New Jersey and New York last October… Not only are we unprepared for [the] future, Fagan argues, “it’s questionable just how much most of us think about it.” Which is why people like Fagan write what they write and environmentalists issue the warnings they do:  they want us to wake up and take action.”—The Daily Beast

More About the Author

Brian Fagan was born in England and studied archaeology at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He was Keeper of Prehistory at the Livingstone Museum, Zambia, from 1959-1965. During six years in Zambia and one in East Africa, he was deeply involved in fieldwork on multidisciplinary African history and in monuments conservation. He came to the United States in 1966 and was Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, from 1967 to 2004, when he became Emeritus.
Since coming to Santa Barbara, Brian has specialized in communicating archaeology to general audiences through lecturing, writing, and other media. He is regarded as one of the world's leading archaeological and historical writers and is widely respected popular lecturer about the past. His many books include three volumes for the National Geographic Society, including the bestselling Adventure of Archaeology. Other works include The Rape of the Nile, a classic history of archaeologists and tourists along the Nile, and four books on ancient climate change and human societies, Floods, Famines, and Emperors (on El Niños), The Little Ice Age, and The Long Summer, an account of warming and humanity since the Great Ice Age. His most recent climatic work describes the Medieval Warm Period: The Great Warming: Climate Change and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations. His other books include Chaco Canyon: Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society and Fish on Friday: Feasting, Fasting, and the Discovery of the New World and Cro-Magnon: How the Ice Age gave birth to the First Modern Humans. His recently published Elixir: A History of Water and Humankind extends his climatic research to the most vital of all resources for humanity.
Brian has been sailing since he was eight years old and learnt his cruising in the English Channel and North Sea. He has sailed thousands of miles in European waters, across the Atlantic, and in the Pacific. He is author of the Cruising Guide to Central and Southern California, which has been a widely used set of sailing directions since 1979. An ardent bicyclist, he lives in Santa Barbara with his life Lesley and daughter Ana.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Edward H. schoeffler on July 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great book for anyone who has an interest in the behavior of this planet and the reasons for so many inexplicable occurences that effect our lives. I would especially recommend it as reading material for those people who lose sleep at night fretting over the damage we humans do to our planet (namely man caused global warming). It is difficult to read this and still maintain the idea that people actually control the earth. Beavers do a pretty good job of building dams but it does not occur to them that they rule the world because of that particular skill.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Transue on September 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very informative, but as the author suggests, maybe not the best book to read cover-to-cover. Many of the same theories/themes are repeated in each geographic/coastal region he examines. I learned a lot about the historic rises and falls of the oceans that I was completely unaware of.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. C Sheehy on August 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I liked a good part of Brian Fagan's book for the main reason he explains that rising ocean levels is hardly a brand new phenomenon. He doesn't suggest that rising sea levels is not something humans are unable to adapt to. By offering a number of examples he shows how people have been over coming and making appropriate changes he shows that sea level changes are something we can deal with.

He also makes a compelling case for the input that human's are having on this issue. By demonstrating how depletion of coastal estuaries, mangroves, barrier islands and such Fagan shows that people are making an adaptable situation much more dangerous. He doesn't blame people for the issues at hand but shows how formally natural processes are being disrupted and having very strong detrimental effects.

Where I think the book comes up short is that it vacillates between being a positive story about human ability to adapt and our detrimental impact having serious long-term effects. It is hard to say what the true agenda of this story is. I still recommend it as the science and the history are top notch but what it is trying to determine or advise is un-clear.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again