Start reading The Aviator (The Burning World Book 1) on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

The Aviator (The Burning World Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Gareth Renowden , Dylan Horrocks
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $4.99
You Save: $10.01 (67%)

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $4.99  
Paperback $12.23  
Kindle Delivers
Kindle Delivers
Subscribe to the Kindle Delivers monthly e-mail to find out about each month's Kindle book deals, new releases, editors' picks and more. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Book Description

Flying around a world battered by rapid climate change and struggling with economic collapse in his hi-tech airship, Lemmy encounters the remnants of our civilisation – the artificial intelligences searching for the singularity, a rocking bishop in his flying cathedral, the last climate sceptics, the technovegans and deep green terrorists, billionaire libertarians in their bubble, and much, much more. Not to mention the goats, the girlfriend with bots in her head and the elixir of life (which is cheese).

"Part dystopian tome a la ‘Mad Max’ meets ‘Waterworld’, part stinging indictment of the mendacious ongoing campaign to deny the threats of human-caused climate change, The Aviator delivers a winning combination of wit and insight as it depicts the perils we may bestow upon future generations if we choose not to act on the greatest threat human civilization has ever faced."
- Professor Michael E Mann, climate scientist and author of The Hockey Stick & the Climate Wars.

"A brilliant and wickedly satirical romp through a post-climate change world."
- Sonny Whitelaw, author of Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis novels.


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gareth Renowden is an award-winning writer, photographer and truffle grower based in the Waipara Valley, New Zealand. Gareth's most recent book, The Aviator, the first in a new series set in The Burning World, was published in 2012. His book on climate change, Hot Topic - Global Warming & The Future of New Zealand, was published by AUT Media in 2007, and shortlisted for the Royal Society of NZ's inaugural science book prize. The Truffle Book (Limestone Hills Publishing 2005) won the Special Jury Award at the 2007 Gourmand World Cookbook Awards in Beijing, and he was the keynote speaker at the 2007 Oregon Truffle Festival. He publishes the influential Hot Topic blog (http://hot-topic.co.nz/), covering climate change science and politics in New Zealand.

Product Details

  • File Size: 585 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Limestone Hills Ltd (November 11, 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008Y0MFTM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #989,535 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read with some slightly implausible premises September 6, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
"The Aviator" puts us in an imaginatively envisioned near-future, with the world divided into small almost-isolated enclaves of wildly differing philosophies, moralities, technology levels and capabilities. The ostensible cause of the collapse of normal civilization is chaos associated with global warming, but the details of that collapse are for the most part missing here, aside from one soberly-drawn rescue mission to a fire-storm-ravaged Australia. How the world and the various characters portrayed got into the state they are in in this book is largely a mystery, but given those premises Renowden does a splendid job of weaving together an exciting story of exploration and discovery. His protagonist with his airship visits almost every continent from his New Zealand base, finding beacons of hope and enlightenment and at the same time doing battle with radical fringes on all sides, from anti-technologists to frontiersmen to high-tech televangelists to Islamic fundamentalists. At times the novel reminded me of some of the ambience and free-wheeling twists and turns of Neal Stephenson's novels - "Snow Crash" and "Anathem" particularly.

Advocates of the "Heartland Institute" and libertarians of the "Atlas Shrugged" variety will probably not appreciate Renowden's portrayal of their ultimate ends, but he has at least as much fun with radical environmentalists. His sympathies seem more clearly to lie with the Singularitarians - but even there Renowden introduces conflicts and concerns (particularly associated with the behavior of the airship's Artificial Intelligence) which suggest a deep thoughtfulness about what really matters in life and in our future. The novel ends with a number of loose ends (where is the airship's owner? What is going on in Europe?) that anticipate a sequel - I'm eagerly looking forward to it!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply enjoyable September 11, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Sci-fi is a departure from my normal reading matter, but I was hooked on The Aviator from chapter one. Rarely have I come across a book that manages to combine so many things: adventure, romance, characterisation and a critical message - ignore climate change at our peril. OK, so perhaps it's a little far-fetched in places (only time will tell), but I can't wait for the next instalment.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable Read September 6, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I found The Aviator an enjoyable read and look forward to the next volume. As in all good SF, the underlying issues are serious, but Renowden's writing is fluent and his humour and satirical eye when applied are sharply entertaining. The book certainly spans the globe, and familiar New Zealand settings shifted into a much-changed future state were intriguing. I liked how the relationships between Artificial Intelligences and humans were developed. It's an entertaining piece of fiction, but leads the reader to consider the kind of future we are setting up for ourselves, and in that respect, it contains real heft. Good price too!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kiwi science fiction with a message August 18, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
This science fiction novel is set in a post-catastrophe world - in the not too distant future. Hardly an unusual scenario but I found its approach to the question of post-catastrophe social organisation intriguing. How would society reorganise after social collapse brought on by a world-engulfing crisis? In this case one of the possible outcomes of climate change? The usual scenario is some sort of tribalism, and usually a warring tribalism. But would it be that simple? After all, humanity would still have reservoirs of knowledge. Surely that would make simple tribalism unlikely?

Gareth Renowden's solution is simple. Consciously or not he has simply extrapolated the ideological or issue-advocacy obvious in today's internet blogs and forums into the post-catastrophe society. Today's digital "silos" become tomorrows tribal groups. And, yes, they are just a inward-looking, suspicious and hostile to others as today's silo communities are. Except they have real weapons. These tribal groups, or ideological ghettos, give scope for some nice irony and humour in the book.

Renowden's post-catastrophe societies include the inevitable fundamentalist religious communities. But also communities based on artificial intelligence, technophobia, libertarianism, cynical "green" politics and so on. And, yes, there is even a climate change denial community - actively denying the world-wide catastrophe had anything to do with human-caused climate change. In fact still warning about an imminent ice-age (naturally caused of course)!

So you can imagine the scope for irony and humour there. Especially as Gareth Renowden is an author the climate change denial community love to hate. And they don't hold back on expressing that hate.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It turns out, it won't be a comet October 17, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The Aviator by Gareth Renowden explores a post-apocalypse world where the apocalypse is not nuclear war or a large object hitting the earth, or even an outbreak of zombi-ism, but rather, climate change. The story itself is an excellent read and even qualifies as a page turner. But there is another element that readers don't need to now, but would enjoy knowing: The author has the science on climate change right.

The truth is, a future Earth with continued climate change could look a lot of different ways, but the planet ala The Aviator is a reasonable approximation of a switched over climate, brought to us by someone who knows the science well. I'm less sure about the interaction between Artificial and Regular "Intelligence" depicted here, but it does produce an interesting interaction between fictional tropes. Climate change is real and unfettered could easily look like it does in this book. Artificial Intelligence is, in my mind, still imagined, and the use of the concept in Renowden's book is highly speculative. So, we have an interesting mix of higher and lower probabilities mixed together with what is otherwise a well imagined and very well told story regardless of the science fiction itself.

I have truly enjoyed it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Great Read ... need more like it
Published 3 months ago by Bruce
5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, funny, provocative, thought provoking - this book has it all
A well written, engrossing story based in the near future which elegantly integrates potential future technologies into the sort of world we may be left with as the result of... Read more
Published 20 months ago by Michael Edmonds
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't wait for the sequel!
I agree with just about all the reviews here. This is the sort of book that ought to be topping the best seller lists!
Can't wait for the sequel. Read more
Published on December 26, 2012 by Paul F Downton
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrills, Romance, Humor in a Climate Change-Ravaged World
The backdrop for this story is the not-to-distant future where climate disruption has collapsed the global economy and forced various groups to splinter off while competing for the... Read more
Published on December 20, 2012 by Scott A. Mandia
4.0 out of 5 stars Not for climate change deniers
This book is tour through what our world might be like if we don't change our ways. It's more realistic than most people will realize. Read more
Published on December 5, 2012 by William Ockham
4.0 out of 5 stars plausible look into the future
I really enjoyed reading this book. A mix of sci fi and fact. It does certainly paint a possible future for our planet and I applaud Gareth Renowden for creating a good read around... Read more
Published on November 21, 2012 by johnnyg
5.0 out of 5 stars Very timely!
The Aviator is a very enjoyable read. Set slightly in the future, it's takes you on a ride through the world after some serious climate change damage has been done. Read more
Published on November 3, 2012 by RitaS
3.0 out of 5 stars A Boy's Own romp in a near-future world
I won't repeat the good points made by other reviewers.
I enjoyed the humour in this book. Gareth Renowden shows how the world might be after some decades of political and... Read more
Published on August 26, 2012 by CarolC
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny and insightful!
A funny, insightful and witty look into what the future could hold should catastrophic climate change come to pass. Read more
Published on August 25, 2012 by Emma
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Gareth Renowden is a writer, photographer and truffle grower based in the Waipara Valley, New Zealand. His latest book is The Aviator, a story set in a world being battered by climate change and economic collapse - the first in a series dealing with the Burning World. Here's the blurb:

Flying around a world riven by climate change and economic collapse in a hi-tech airship, Lemmy encounters the strange remnants of civilisation - people searching for the singularity, a rocking bishop in his flying cathedral, the last climate sceptics, deep green terrorists, billionaire libertarians in their bubble, and much, much more. Not to mention the goats, the girlfriend with bots in her head and the elixir of life (which is cheese).

Gareth's recent book, Hot Topic - Global Warming & The Future of New Zealand, was published by AUT Media in 2007, and shortlisted for the Royal Society of NZ's inaugural science book prize. The Truffle Book (Limestone Hills Publishing 2005) won the Special Jury Award at the 2007 Gourmand World Cookbook Awards in Beijing, and he was the keynote speaker at the 2007 Oregon Truffle Festival. He publishes the influential Hot Topic blog (http://hot-topic.co.nz/), covering climate change science and politics in New Zealand.

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category