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The Awful Grace of God: Religious Terrorism, White Supremacy, and the Unsolved Murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. Hardcover – March 27, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Counterpoint (March 27, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582438307
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582438306
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,549,052 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


Praise for The Awful Grace of God

“A timely study.” —Kirkus

“A step in the [right] direction of a better understanding of a national tragedy.” —Booklist

About the Author

Stuart Wexler was born and raised in New Jersey. He graduated from Tulane
University with a degree in history. He now lives and teaches high school in New Jersey, where he won the prestigious James Madison Teachers’ Fellowship in 2010.

Larry Hancock was raised in Oklahoma and graduated from the University of
New Mexico with a triple major in anthropology, history, and education. He has worked on a variety of historical research projects, including November Patriots and Someone Would Have Talked. He lives in Oklahoma.

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Customer Reviews

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christian Toussay on September 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Now this is the first time that I've read something by Larry Hancock which came short of my expectations. "Someone would have talked..." is in my top 5 book list about the Assassination.

In this rather contrived effort, however, Hancock and his coauthor Wexler reassess the MLK evidence, and conclude that Ray indeed did it, and that the effort was funded by Southern extreme right wing racists. The book is quite repetitive, with the only new information of interest (the identification of rabid activists and their political mentors) being brought forth every other page, or so it seems.

For those who follows the case, an aged,ailing Memphis restaurant owner (of a grill house located right under the boarding house where the shot that killed MLK was alledgedly fired), Floyd Jowers, came forth in the 90s and contacted the King family to confess his (unwitting, he claimed) participation in the hit on King.
Despite formidable resistance from official Justice, King lawyers managed to bring the case to trial. By preliminary arrangements, the King family had agreed to sue Jowers for just a symbolic penalty of a few dollars.

This spectacular trial is documented in a riveting book, "the 13th juror: the complete transcript of the MLK assassination conspiracy trial",that you can find here at Amazon. It is nearly 800 pages, but I can assure you this is an absolute page-turner.

The authors of "The awful grace of God" dismiss the Jowers confession without much argumentation, hinting that he might have done so for monetary gain, but without producing any evidence for this claim.
I have not heard of any book of film deal negociated by Jowers to cash in on his confession.
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Peter D. Scott on April 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The two authors are meticulous about facts and sources. They clear away a lot of false stories about the King assassination, and also point to where a new investigation should begin. It is most heartening to see such a great new book.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Boylan on April 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most will dismiss the idea that the Klan plotted and succeeded in killing Martin Luther King. The truth was that there were many attempts and plots that failed over the years as documented by the authors. The perception of the KKK was that they were just a group sheet wearing rednecks. At a local level this may have true but the authors bring to light, this wasn't the case at the national level. Certain Klan and religious leaders had a larger plan start a race war and this was their opening shot.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alan Kent on December 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In this work, Stu Wexler and Larry Hancock take research into the the murder of Dr. King out of the realm of gauzy speculation and into a serious investigation of a crime. Focusing on a $100,000 bounty offer from a group (the Mississippi-based White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan) who had repeatedly attempted to assassinate King before, the authors tie pursuit of this offer with the movements of James Earl Ray after his escape from the Missouri State Penitentiary in 1967. While they are agnostic as to whether Ray actually shot King, it is quite clear from the evidence they assemble that Ray was stalking him in the lead-up to the murder.

In the course of clearing out chaff from some previous popular writings on the King murder, Wexler and Hancock engage in some lively debunking of the Lloyd Jowers story, pointing out (among many specific problems with the case made by William Pepper) that the Memphis civil trial proceeding that buttresses the story allowed huge swaths of dubious testimony into the record unchallenged. As an aside, relating to the comment of a previous reviewer that the authors hint that Jowers was in it to profit from his story but offer no proof, the authors specifically cite Dr. Pepper's own work, wherein he relates a story about a Jowers' attempt to persuade one of Pepper's witnesses to alter her story in the pursuit of a $300,000 book/movie offer.

Beyond a paradigm-shifting look at the probable course of a conspiracy to murder Dr. King, Wexler and Hancock probe further - into the frightening ideological swampland that propelled the conspirators: the Christian Identity beliefs of the man whose body of work was slavishly followed by White Knights head Sam Bowers and his cohorts: the Rev. Wesley Swift.
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