Buy New
$26.60
Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $8.40 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Battle for Barrels: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures Hardcover – February 1, 2009


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$26.60
$8.17 $0.94
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books (February 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846680123
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846680120
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,593,836 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The Battle for Barrels says we should take warnings of impending Armageddon with a pinch of salt."--Guardian

"It is a 'must read' antidote to the gloom and doom conclusions of oil scarcity."--Peter R. Odell, Professor Emeritus, International Energy Studies, Erasmus University, Rotterdam

"A successful demolition of the theories behind the peak-oil movement."--The Petroleum Economist

About the Author

Duncan Clarke is Chairman and CEO of Global Pacific & Partners, a private advisory firm operating from offices in London, The Hague, Johannesburg and Nicosia. He gained his PhD in economics in 1975, and was a lecturer, economist and advisor, before establishing GP&P, with a focus on economics and strategy in the worldwide upstream industry.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By ECKJR on November 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The message of this book would have made a great editorial, but it doesn't make a great book. The language is stilted, it rambles on and on, is repetitious and uses words such as "lacustrine" and foreign language phrases that are meaningless to probably most readers.

To save you time and the price of the book, the gist of the book is this: The Peak Oil proponents are like those who predict the end of the world on a certain date, then, when that doesn't happen, chose another future date. They also ignore the possiblity of future oil finds.

On the other hand, the author makes what appears to be a valid and reasoned argument that nobody has a clue as to how much oil there really is on earth, as exploration to find new basins/reservoirs is expensive, takes years, and is high risk (due to terrorism, politcs, etc.)

For the reader interested in a view at the extreme opposite of the Peak Oil theory, in his book "The Deep Hot Biosphere," Thomas Gold gives arguments and evidence that we'll never run out of oil because it is continually being synthesized far beneath the surface of the earth by the extreme pressures and temperatures there.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 27 people found the following review helpful By AX on December 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is my second attempt at reviewing this piece of garbage. The first one got magically taken away.

Anyways, I'll be somewhat brief. The book stinks. It is a 10 page paper masquerading as a full-length book. This of course makes sense because the average person would feel cheated if they paid $20 for a 10 page paper.

The author immediately starts into explaining generalities of the oil industry's current state and just repeats them over and over. No real intro into how the oil exploration industry works. In fact, you get almost no background at all. But you do get acronyms. Ohhhh.....the acronyms.

ASPO. ODAC. IEA. EIA. MBOPD. CERA-IHS. MMBOPB. API. CTL. LNG. GDP. BOE. UNIDO. And that's just chapter 3.

Really this is just a pointless book. I somewhat agree with the overall philosophy. I'm in the "yeah, we're running out of oil, but it's not all going to disappear in a single day so chill out" camp, but this book is a waste.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Who was the intended audience for this book? Pissed off oil company economists? I can say with a fair amount of confidence that it was not aimed at your average person, because it was either very dry with tons of unexplained oil industry or economic jargon, or just plain hostile. Scorn for peak oil theorists virtually dripped from the pages. Not very compelling, and rather off-putting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Robin Mills on March 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book makes a good case against fears of an imminent decline in global oil output ('peak oil'). Clarke presents a view based on long and deep experience of the petroleum industry, and his book therefore serves as a counterbalance to many ill-informed proponents of 'peak oil'. He points out the complex interplay of geology, economics, technology and politics in the modern oil world, and the many corporate and state players, which make it impossible to reduce the world oil future to a few simple parameters. There are few, if any, books making this case, which gives this text particular importance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search