Beast Within, The and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.92 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Beast Within: A Tale ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by All-Booked-Up
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very gently used. Pages are unmarked, and binding is tight. Minimal shelf wear. May be missing dust jacket. Beautiful book.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Beast Within: A Tale of Beauty's Prince Hardcover – July 22, 2014


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.07
$8.55 $7.34
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$13.07 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Beast Within: A Tale of Beauty's Prince + Fairest of All: A Tale of the Wicked Queen + The Curse of Maleficent: The Tale of a Sleeping Beauty
Price for all three: $32.59

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Gifts for Young Readers
Visit our Children's Books store to find great gifts for every child. Shop by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Disney Press (July 22, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423159128
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423159124
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,578 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4–6—Many children grow up with some familiarity with the story of Beauty and the Beast, particularly the Walt Disney version. Readers often admire the beautiful and smart Belle, a devoted daughter and booklover, who is as lovely on the inside as the outside. That she could come to love such a horrific-looking and reclusive creature is testament to her kind nature. And yet, readers know so little of this mysterious Beast and of the spell that caused him to become an outcast within his own kingdom. In this spin-off from Disney's retelling of the old tale, Valentino does her best to expand upon the Beast's side of things: What was it that transformed the handsome and charming Prince into a Beast? Gaston plays a big role in this story, as does a competing love interest of both male characters, Tulip. Belle doesn't appear until toward the end, as this book operates as a prelude to the film. Some new characters add interest, such as the Odd Sisters, a trio of witches spurred by a broken heart and a zeal for revenge. As interesting as that premise is, the book is weighted down by clunky writing, shallow character development, a lack of depth and nuance. It will likely appeal to only the most die-hard fans of the Disney film.—Meg Allison, The Moretown School, VT

Review

4Q 4P M This prequel to Beauty and the Beast is presented as a young adult title, yet its layout and format might attract a middle-grade population. The writing is polished and appealing to young teens, with just enough spin on the old tale to encourage young readers to stay with the story. Valentino brings back the Macbethian "Odd Sisters"-young witches with a definite nod to Shakespeare's Weird Sisters-who first appeared in her retelling of Snow White, Fairest of All (Disney, 2009), in which we can see the villain's point of view. The author knows the structure of fairy tales and enhances this one with some new characters who bring life to the "tale as old as time." She also weaves in a few threads from the old film version by Cocteau and hints at Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray. Readers learn how the Beast came to be cursed; witness quite a bit of his backstory, as well as those of the other familiar faces, like Belle's father; and feel satisfied by the conclusion and the hopeful message that beauty comes from within. The popularity of television series such as Once Upon a Time and Grimm make this book even more appealing to contemporary young readers. This volume will do well in middle school library collections, as well as medium-sized public libraries with solid tween collections.-Jane Murphy.—VOYA

The tale of a beautiful girl transforming a beast to his original princely form is a familiar and often retold one, but the story of how exactly the prince initially came to be cursed and why is less well known. Valentino sets her version of the prince's perspective in the Disney world, with Cogsworth, Lumiere, and even Mrs. Potts all making an appearance. The setting and the plot are far darker here, however, and musical numbers with dancing cutlery are replaced by the internal contemplations of an increasingly melancholic and occasionally violent Beast as he transforms from human to monster. It begins with the Prince's betrayal of Circe, a young maiden whom he initially woos for her beauty and then rejects when he discovers she is merely a pig farmer's daughter. Her older sisters, a trio of magical witches, vengefully cast a spell on the Prince, and the spoiled, selfish man futilely tries to outrun his fate, losing his human form and almost his mind in the process. Valentino is so successful at making the Prince unlikable that he seems nearly irredeemable, and a disjointed timeline makes it difficult to identify the chronology of the moral transformation that must precede his physical one. The combination of the Disney tie-in and the thoughtful, more folkloric elements, though, makes this an interesting choice for readers who've outgrown the pink-princess phase but are still captivated by fairy tales. KQG—BCCB

A retelling of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, told from the Beast's perspective. The story opens as the Beast contemplates whether Belle-recently made a prisoner in his castle-will ever come to love him. The timeline then moves backward to the days when the Beast was a human prince, and so begins a story that is predictable-when it isn't entirely ridiculous-and filled with characters as flat as the pages they're written on. As a human prince, the Beast spurns the love of Circe, who turn out to be the younger sister of the "odd sisters," witches whose behavior is so nonsensical it's a wonder they stop cackling long enough to curse him. Though the pre-Beast Prince certainly deserves his curse, whether any actual human being could contain the degree of vanity, selfishness and conceit the Prince exhibits is questionable. One interesting curveball comes in the presentation of the Prince and Gaston (the vain sportsman romantically interested in Belle) as childhood best friends. However, the blandness of the characters negates anything interesting that might have sprung from this twist, which is not nearly enough to save the story as a whole. With clunky writing, an uninspired plot and unbelievably one-dimensional characters (including villains so absurd no one would fear them), this spinoff effort is disappointing at best. (Fantasy. 12-18)—Kirkus

Gr 4-6 Many children grow up with some familiarity with the story of Beauty and the Beast, particularly the Walt Disney version. Readers often admire the beautiful and smart Belle, a devoted daughter and booklover, who is as lovely on the inside as the outside. That she could come to love such a horrific-looking and reclusive creature is testament to her kind nature. And yet, readers know so little of this mysterious Beast and of the spell that caused him to become an outcast within his own kingdom. In this spin-off from Disney's retelling of the old tale, Valentino does her best to expand upon the Beast's side of things: What was it that transformed the handsome and charming Prince into a Beast? Gaston plays a big role in this story, as does a competing love interest of both male characters, Tulip. Belle doesn't appear until toward the end, as this book operates as a prelude to the film. Some new characters add interest, such as the Odd Sisters, a trio of witches spurred by a broken heart and a zeal for revenge. As interesting as that premise is, the book is weighted down by clunky writing, shallow character development, a lack of depth and nuance. It will likely appeal to only the most die-hard fans of the Disney film. Meg Allison, The Moretown School, VT—SLJ

Customer Reviews

You are left feeling completely satisfied at the end (rushed much, by the way?)
Amanda Freidel
If you are a huge fan of Beauty and the Beast don’t waste your time with the book and stick just with the movie.
Jenn
There are few books I've started that I couldn't finish reading but this one of them.
Michael Chinn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 30, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I actually loved the book. It was a very dark look into The Beast early tortured life. I thought it was genius that in this book The Beast didn't just turned INTO the beast like in the movie. It was gradually he morphed into the Beast noticing little menacing things in his appearance changing the darker his heart got. I also loved how everyone who entered the castle saw the CURSE in a different view as in Belle could talk to the enchanted servants but the Beast couldn't & was horrified that as his servants slowly disappeared theses inanimate objects would appear as somewhat haunted or possessed house hold objects that had the voices of his once dear servants but every time he came around to see them they'd be regular inanimate house hold objects again. It was a very dark twist that I loved along with Gaston being his childhood best friend and how they slowly forgot each due to the curses power.

The only 2 thing that could've been fixed is the "Abrupt Ending", I would of loved to see The Beast learn through Belle what became of the servants instead of at the end he's just happy to see them again when the curses lifted.

But other than those two things I love this Darker Retelling of Disney's Beauty & The Beast. This book was a lot better than the movie Maleficent where they made "Disney Best Villain" a hero at the end. Anyway when the make the Live Action Beauty & The Beast I hope they use some of the Dark elements of this book in the movie. Long LIVE DARK DISNEY.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Lang on August 8, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this story. It showed how the Beast/Prince learned what true love was and wasn't. Granted Belle wasn't a major character in the book and there wasn't detail about how he won her affection, but I except that's because there's a good chance that we've seen the movie or read other stories. The focus of this story was a previous relationship, and offered details into how the curse changed the prince and the castle over time. Very enjoyable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Freidel on August 27, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I happen to stumble upon the book today when I was at Disney World. I read Fairest of Them All and from what I remember, I liked it and was touched at the ending... (Now, I need to go back and reread that one to make sure my memory isn't playing tricks on me). So, of course when I saw there was another one out, I scooped it up and bought it. I am not joking when I say this. I read this in two hours, praying that it would eventually get better.... That was a pipe dream.
Please don't get me wrong, the concept behind it is good. But that is where it stops.
The writing is terrible. Seriously, the reference Buttchinland is used.
The fact that modern day terminology and phrases are used in a period piece drove me up a wall.
The character development is disastrous. More attention was put into what the characters look like than who they actually are and their back stories.
The Prince/ Beast (who never actually receives a name) is a downright despicable human being who gets the fairy tale ending. I was almost hopefully Belle would find out all the terrible things he had done and walk away.
You are left feeling completely satisfied at the end (rushed much, by the way?) and wondering if this was just the first draft for this book.
I have never ever returned a book on my life but I'll make sure I do with this one...
What a joke.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
It honestly just was not a very well written book. The characters weren't fleshed out enough, and I agree with another reviewer who states that the entire book builds the Beast up to be such a horrific human being that his redemption falls short. I couldn't understand why the book didn't use characters names either. Why keep calling the prince "Prince" or Princess Tulips nanny "Nanny". I'm sure they both have names that could have been used, and I'm confident as a reader that I would have been able to keep up with them. There were also weird tie ins to Ursula and the Evil Queen that felt forced and unnecessary.

Overall, in hindsight, the book is not one I would ever purchase. Borrow it from the library to see if you enjoy it first.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
The Beast Within
Serena Valentino
Fantasy

Review: Finally a book that tells us the Beast’s side of the story. For those of us who have always loved “Beauty and the Beast” but wanted to know more about the Beast’s curse and what he was feeling this book is something to read. I do have to warn people it really does paint the Prince before he became the beast in a very bad light. The Prince, as he has no name, is not like Prince Charming or Prince Eric. No he does not want to fall madly in love and live happily ever after. Instead he wants to go hunting and marry a girl who is beautiful and titled and only for that reason. Unfortunately this gets him into some trouble when he scorns a witch because he believes she is a daughter of a pig farmer and as such below him. Since he broke her heart she places the curse on him and her three older maniac witch sisters make sure it’s really a bad curse.
After this, the prince does not seem to improve much until, of course, the beautiful Belle arrives on the scene. With her his whole life changes but we all know that part of the story. The most extraordinary part is that the Prince does not see the servants the way Belle does. He doesn’t see a clock or a candle stick he sees menacing statues who want to hurt him, which is a part of the curse he has to suffer with. This is just one of the extraordinary revelations made in this book. I really enjoyed this book and had a very hard time putting it down until the very end, even with how horrible the Prince was in many parts of this book. I recommend this to lovers of fairy tales who like myself have always wanted to see the princes’ side of the stories. Remember though for those who want a prince who is perfect in every way from beginning to end, this book is probably not for you.

I received a free ecopy of this book from Netgally for my honest opinion.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews