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145 of 151 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...Mother Mary Comes To Me...Speaking Words Of Wisdom..."
Commonly known as the "Blue Album", the 2LP vinyl set "1967 - 1970" became an instant classic when it was first released in April 1973 (as did its "Red" counterpart "1962-1966"). When they were finally reissued onto the new CD format in 1993 however, they caused consternation because of their extortionate full price.

So is this newly remastered 2010 mid-priced...
Published on October 19, 2010 by Mark Barry

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Suspicious
The music setlist and sound are great for any Beatles fan. I have practically every Beatles cd, and all came in perfect condition from Amazon, except this one. This was supplied by Star Deals and shipped by Amazon. One song, "With a Little Help From My Friends", skips at one point, but plays through. The disc is scratched from the very poor cardboard sleeve it comes...
Published 13 months ago by Dennis A. Pewsey


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145 of 151 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...Mother Mary Comes To Me...Speaking Words Of Wisdom...", October 19, 2010
This review is from: The Beatles: 1967-1970 (Audio CD)
Commonly known as the "Blue Album", the 2LP vinyl set "1967 - 1970" became an instant classic when it was first released in April 1973 (as did its "Red" counterpart "1962-1966"). When they were finally reissued onto the new CD format in 1993 however, they caused consternation because of their extortionate full price.

So is this newly remastered 2010 mid-priced 2CD reissue on EMI/Apple 5099990674723 any better - the answer is an emphatic 'yes'.

PACKAGING:
The first thing you notice is that the clunky double jewel-case of the 1993 reissue has been dumped for a three-way foldout card sleeve. The centre and right flaps picture the photograph on the inner gatefold of the original vinyl double album (St. Pancras Old Church in London, 27 July 1969, The Beatles with the public looking through the railings - it's the same photo on the "Red" album). It also houses the two CDs - CD1 has the full Apple label (14 tracks, 51:15 minutes) and the 2nd CD has the half Apple logo (14 tracks, 48:43 minutes). The vinyl set is yet to come, the Digital Download versions are available from 25 Oct 2010 and there's also an issue that lumps both the Blue & Red reissues together as one package in late November.

The left flap houses a new 32-page booklet. The lyrics are intact from the inner sleeves of the original album issue, there's new liner notes by BILL FLANAGAN the MTV Executive and author of "Evening's Empire" (a book on Rock in the Sixties) and there's plenty of superb colour photos from the period - it's impressively done. Downsides - some complained that the 09/09/09 card digipak sleeves for The Beatles reissues were easy to smudge once out of the shrinkwrap and worse - the inner flaps easy to tear as you removed the disc. I'm afraid these are the same. I suppose I would have been naÔve of us to think that EMI would actually listen to the complaints of 2009 about packaging, but they haven't - the need for these issues to look the same as the preceding ones has overridden all considerations... Having said that, I still think they look great - substantial even...

PLAYING TIMES:
Unlike the "Red" issue which could easily have fitted onto 1CD (and even included bonus tracks), as you can see from the playing times provided above, it would not have been possible with this set. Anyway - EMI would of course argue that a single CD issue of this most `iconic' of double albums would fundamentally alter the aesthetic of the original release. At least this time, this 2CD reissue is at mid price, so we're not being charged for the privilege of separation.

TRACK CHOICES:
The compilation itself is basically the A-sides of all their UK 7" singles releases between 1967 and 1970 in chronological release date order with a few key album tracks thrown in for good measure. Eagle-eye fans would therefore note that up to and including "Get Back" - ALL Beatles UK 7" singles for that period were issued only in MONO ("The Ballad Of John & Yoko" was their 1st STEREO single in the UK). So the tracks on the album should reflect that - the MONO single mixes. But EMI did nothing of the sort. They're all in STEREO (there's 4 MONO on the "Red" set) and i would argue that accuracy's loss is the listener's gain, because the STEREO versions used here are awesome.

SOUND:
Although the compilation is copyrighted to 2010 (released Monday 18 Oct 2010 in the UK and 19 Oct 2010 in the USA), the liner notes don't try to hide that these are the 2009 remasters by the same team who did the much-praised Beatles catalogue of 09/09/09. The sound quality is fantastic - breathtaking clarity on instruments - the piano and guitars on "Lady Madonna", the jet screeching in at the opening of "Back In The U.S.S.R", the brass on "All You Need Is Love", Billy Preston's superb keyboard work on "Let It Be", the wonderfully loose live feel of "Don't Let Me Down" (best B-side ever?) - and so on.

CONTENT:
But what impresses most is the actual listen itself. Even now, it's truly shocking to hear just how accomplished The Beatles became during this ludicrously productive period. And diversity of writers crept in too. There's the 4 Harrison gems "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", "Old Brown Shoe" and the magical double of "Something" and "Here Comes The Sun", while Ringo gets the witty "Octopus's Garden". Leaving the rest as Lennon-McCartney originals. And what an embarrassment of riches they are...

7" perfection comes twice - "Strawberry Fields Forever" b/w "Penny Lane" and arguably the greatest single ever released - "Hey Jude" b/w "Revolution" (melodious Paul on the A with rockin' blistering John on the B). Most bands would kill a close relative to get anywhere near this level of genius. And by the time you get to the ballads at the end of Disc 2 - "The Long And Winding Road" and "Across The Universe" - adjectives begin to fail you... Were The Beatles really 'this' good - the answer is yes - and always will be.

To sum up - the sound on these new reissues is fabulous; the packaging better than the 1993 versions and each is being sold at mid-price - available in most places for less than the price of a single new album. You can't help but think that millions of people globally will take one look at these beauties on a shelf somewhere and slap them straight into their shopping baskets. And rightly so...

I've loved re-hearing these classic Beatles songs in this beautiful sound quality - I really have - and despite some minor packaging quibbles - the 2010 version of the "Blue" album is wholeheartedly recommended.
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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More like a 100 stars for this album,'The Beatles 1967-1970'., June 28, 2006
Like many before me,this "blue" Beatles best-of served as my first,in-depth sampling of The Beatles' output from their post-'Revolver' era from early-1967 onward... You couldn't find a better 100+ minutes of music to listen to straight through than the superb 28 tracks that make up 'The Beatles 1967-1970'. I bought this initially back in the winter of 1988 (I was 18 at the time) on cassette,and it changed my life. True; the 2-cd version often retails at $34.00,which is a bit much,but the material contained is beyond priceless.. About the songs. The songs!! There's not a lame one among the batch of 28. What's even cooler is that -even as the songs unfurl chronologically- they pack a flow to rival any of anyone's favorite best-of albums... The flow of all 28 is remarkable... A fantastic mix of all their late '60's #1 hits as well as choice album cuts ("A Day In The Life","I Am The Walrus")... Seriously folks; anyone who is feeling the itch to discover The Beatles' later output should get this "blue" best-of first,then graduate onto the studio albums themselves.. That's what happened to me and I wound up (so far) buying all of the albums from 'Rubber Soul' (1965) onwards... This blue '1967-1970' never disappoints. Because the liner notes/inlay booklet doesn't tell you which album each track is culled from,I'll happily fill you in:

Disc One:

1.)Strawberry Fields Forever(John in vocals)

2.)Penny Lane(Paul on vocals)

(Both originally released as a stand-alone single in early 1967 and both served as the first tracks recorded for what would be 1967's "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band". However,the two songs weren't released on any Beatles' album until late-1967's 'Sgt. Pepper' follow-up 'Magical Mystery Tour'.)

3.)Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band(Paul on vocals)

4.)With A Little Help From My Friends (Ringo on vocals)

5.)Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds(John on vocals)

6.)A Day In The Life(John and Paul on vocals)

3-6 from the legendary 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'; 1967.

7.)All You Need Is Love (John on vocals)

8.)I Am The Walrus(John on vocals)

9.)Hello,Goodbye(Paul on vocals)

10.)The Fool On The Hill (Paul on vocals)

11.)Magical Mystery Tour(John on vocals)

7-11 from 'Magical Mystery Tour'; 1967

12.)Lady Madonna(Paul on vocals)

13.)Hey Jude(Paul on vocals)

14.)Revolution(John on vocals)

12-14 all stand-alone singles released in 1968. All were/are

huge hits. Sweet!

Disc Two:

1.)Back In The U.S.S.R.(Paul on vocals)

2.)While My Guitar Gently Weeps(George on vocals)

3.)Ob-La-Di,Ob-La-Da(Paul on vocals)

1-3 taken from 1968's double-album 'The Beatles' (aka "The White Album").

4.)Get Back(Paul on vocals) (Originally recorded 1969 as a single and not released on album until 1970's 'Let It Be'. Twistedly,'Let It Be' was recorded prior to 1969's final Beatles' studio album 'Abbey Road',but not released until later...)

5.)Don't Let Me Down(non-album b-side to the "Get Back" single; John on vocals)

6.)The Ballad Of John And Yoko (non-LP stand-alone single; John on vocals. One of the very few Beatles tracks recorded with only John and Paul playing all the instruments..)

7.)Old Brown Shoe(b-side to "The Ballad Of John And Yoko"; George on vocals)

All of the hits plus some choice b-sides as well.. Yeah!!

8.)Here Comes The Sun(George on vocals)

9.)Come Together(John on vocals)

10.)Something(George on vocals)

11.)Octopus's Garden (Ringo on vocals)

(All culled from 1969's *true* final Beatle masterpiece,'Abbey Road')

12.)Let It Be (Paul on vocals)

13.)Across The Universe(John on vocals)

14.)The Long And Winding Road (Paul on vocals)

12-14 from 1970's (actually recorded early 1969) 'Let It Be'.

So there you go... 28 of THE very best music ever to grace the world... (Seriously.) Please do yourself a favor and check out *any* Beatles' music. But a choice place to start certainly is here. Have Fun/Enjoy/Peace!

Thanks for your time.

Tim Goyer

Albany,NY

USA

6/28/06
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91 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius!, January 17, 2002
By 
Kenton Larsen (Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The "Red" and "Blue" Beatles CDs are testament to the genius of the band's music and are an excellent overview and a great place to start for those uninitiated (if there are such people) with the greatest band in history.
1962-1966 ("Red") covers the Beatles' Merseybeat era, a time when the Beatles were considered a singles "teenybopper" band. Among the best cuts on the first CD are "Please Please Me", "She Loves You", "Eight Days a Week", and "Ticket to Ride".
Their progression from teenyboppers to "serious band" begins to show in the songs from 1965's Rubber Soul, including "Norwegian Wood", featuring George Harrison on the sitar, and John Lennon's introspective "In My Life", which hints at the band's glorious and more complex studio work that was to follow.
The Red CD collection ends with two songs from 1966's Revolver, a record that placed the band on even higher creative ground: Paul McCartney's masterpiece "Eleanor Rigby" is the first time a string quartet accompanied a rock and roll record, and "Yellow Submarine" was one in a line of catchy, childlike songs written for resident jester and drummer extrodinaire Ringo Starr.
The first disc of 1967-1970 ("Blue") has the far more unenviable task of selecting four representative tracks from 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, still considered to be the most ground-breaking and influential album in the history of rock. "A Day in the Life" is the standout -- Sgt. Pepper's closer and emotional peak.
The CD closes with the two songs that best demonstrate the eventual clash in Lennon and McCartney's songwriting styles: McCartney's "Hey Jude" and Lennon's "Revolution" were sides A and B respectively of the Beatles' greatest-selling (and perhaps just "greatest") single. Where Lennon's song is a snarling, self-righteous rocker, McCartney's is a sing-song orchestral ballad. The one you like best probably depends on whether you're a "John" or "Paul" person -- truth is they're both great.
The final CD spans from 1968's The Beatles ("The White Album") to the end of the band's career. McCartney's best moments "Let it Be", "Get Back", and "The Long and Winding Road" (Despite that over-the-top Phil Spector production) are here, as are Lennon's "Don't Let Me Down" and "Come Together". The closer is "Long and Winding Road", though it's perhaps a weaker conclusion than "Two of Us" might have been.
The Red and Blue collections are awesome reminders of the Beatles' past accomplishments and their continued vitality even today.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ULTIMATE desert island disc, August 30, 2002
By 
R.J. (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
No matter how much music I've listened to over the years, I always come back to the "blue" album, in my opinion the best greatest hits package of all time. From Sgt. Pepper, to Magical Mystery Tour, to the White Album, Abbey Road and Let It Be, it captures the best of the Beatles' later more creative period. This was my introduction to A Day In the Life, I Am The Walrus, Don't Let Me Down, and other songs which I didn't know at the time. Many years later I have bought all the records, heard all the songs a million times, but there's something about playing this at the right time that makes this the one I would take to a desert island with me. (if I could choose only one)
Any collection which has Hey Jude, Let It Be, Get Back, Strawberry Fields Forever and While My Guitar Gently Weeps on the same album is pretty damn great no matter how you look at it, and there's much more of course. Over the years there have been other much hyped collections, but the red and blue albums are absolutely definitive.
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38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Please stop the madness, October 26, 2010
This review is from: The Beatles: 1967-1970 (Audio CD)
Kids, what you have to realize is the Blue (and the Red) albums aren't just more made up compilations from the digital age. Long ago in a galaxy far far away these albums were stand alone collections. An awful lot of people who grew up with the Beatles bought these for a variety of reasons, some to replace their worn out albums, others might have just missed the relavance of it all but were old enough in 1973 to want to know what they missed out on. People loved these two collections just for what they were at the time. For some, the Blue album was really their Abbey Road, you know?

Nobody bitched about length of LP sides, mono vs. stereo or anything else. You just played the LP's and loved the music completely. I still think the Blue album is the finest "best of" collection ever issued, by anybody.

So take a deep breath and enjoy this for what it was.....and still is. Bonus tracks would do nothing to improve on this, you really think it would???? If you disagree then by all means burn your CDR's and move on.

Thank you.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thorough and satisfying collection, May 25, 2000
A more thorough overview of their significant hits from the respective period than the companion Red album, all twenty-eight of the songs included on "1967-1970" (The Blue Album) are rock classics.
We're treated to a generous seven of the eleven tracks from "Magical Mystery Tour," and "Sgt. Pepper's" is accurately represented as well. Another bonus is the faster, more popular version of "Revolution," different than what was included on "The White Album."
From trippy pop ("Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" and "I Am the Walrus") to classic rock ("Get Back," "Come Together,") to their all-time epic masterpiece ("A Day in the Life"), this compilation of the Beatles is virtually without error. For baby boomers, a trip down memory lane. For musicians, a textbook on composition and production. For lovers of pop and rock music, an unbeatable treasure.
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34 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Day In the Life intro, October 19, 2010
By 
This review is from: The Beatles: 1967-1970 (Audio CD)
Just for those interested: The new remastered version of the Blue album, retains the "clean" intro to "A Day In The Life" as was done on the previous CD release. This was the only offical way to get this song without the fade in from SPLHCB-reprise. The US album version (vinyl) had the fade in version.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Skims the Cream Quite Well, October 19, 2001
By 
the dirty mac "boot64" (Nutopian Global Institute) - See all my reviews
Nicknamed the Blue Album, this continues where the 1962-66 Red Album leaves off. Compiling a proper overview of the later Beatles poses an even more exacting challenge than an overview of the early Beatles. The later Beatle albums were carefully sequenced and segued and need to be heard from start to finish; they are not easily cannibalized for greatest hits treatment. But in the end the Blue Album accomplishes its mission.
Disc 1 captures the Beatles at their creative peak. "Strawberry Fields Forever," "Penny Lane," "A Day in the Life," and "Hey Jude" are the crown jewels in the Beatle legacy. "Hello Goodbye," "I Am the Walrus," "Magical Mystery Tour," "Lady Madonna," "Revolution" and the rest are not exactly duds either. Hearing them is always like listening to them for the first time, which is the test of a great song.
Disc 2 has occasioned the most criticism -- some legitimate, some petty. Yes, it would have been nice to have had more than three WHITE ALBUM tracks ("Birthday" and "Julia" would have been logical additions when this was released on CD). Yes, we can debate if "Old Brown Shoe," a pretty obscure George Harrison B side, really belongs here. But come on: It's ridiculous to lambaste a CD that includes "Get Back," "Here Comes the Sun," "Come Together," "Something" (hailed by Frank Sinatra as the greatest love song that he ever heard) and "Let It Be."
The version of "Let It Be" included here is the single version that was produced by George Martin, not the album version that was smothered beneath Phil Spector's bombastic overdubs. In fairness to Spector, he did a decent job salvaging "Across the Universe." The violins and female choruses mesh well with the mood of John Lennon's lyrics, which are some of the best that he ever wrote. Paul McCartney publicly rebuked Spector's use of female choruses on "The Long and Winding Road" -- an ironic complaint coming from someone who would spend the next fifteen years inflicting his wife on our ears. (Sorry for the cheap shot; McCartney is correct to say that the ANTHOLOGY 3 version, lacking Spector's overdubs, is superior.)
The Blue Album, like its Red companion, has complete lyrics as well as rare photos not included in the 1973 vinyl release. The remastered sound is good, although "All You Need Is Love" still sounds rather thin. But in stark contrast to the Red Album, this has just enough music to justify packaging it as a two disc set.
SGT. PEPPER, THE WHITE ALBUM and ABBEY ROAD are essential listening and will become more so when they are finally remastered. The Blue Album cannot give you a full sense of them. What the Red and Blue albums do best is demonstrate why the popularity of the Beatles continues to flow so wide and deep. Extremely versatile and eclectic, it's amazing that the same band that made "I Want to Hold Your Hand" also made "Revolution," that the same band that made "Drive My Car" also made "The Long and Winding Road." Say what you will about the Beatles, but you could never accuse them of standing pat.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Art of Great Compilations (and Sequencing), July 9, 2004
Despite the number of releases in the late 90's with the Anthology series, the Beatles greatest songs have been compiled only one time in the last 30 years, in 2000's "1". It's fun to go back to the companion 1973 releases "1962-1966" and this "1967-1970" (28 tracks, 99 min.), and marvel in particular at the latter's song selection and sequencing.
While now a bit awkwardly on 2 CDs, the original double vinyl was the perfect package. The song selection is just about perfect, really. Nothing to take away from "1", but can you really call that the ultimate compilation of the Beatles when it doesn't have "A Day in the Life" (the definitive Beatles song?) or "While My Guitar Gently Weeps"? Maybe it's too soon yet after "1", but I really believe there is room for a 2 CD collection of the entire Beatles catalogue (greatest hits and essential album tracks) along the lines of "The Definitive Bob Dylan", a great example of how to use the full capacity of CDs. Is anyone with me on that?
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Beatles - the Hippie Years., October 2, 2002
By 
"1967-1970" (or the "Blue" album) compiles singles, Number One hits, and key album cuts from the "Sgt. Pepper," "The Beatles," "Abbey Road," and "Let it Be" albums. Unlike "1," which excludes important tracks that didn't top the chart, the Blue album is a more comprehensive survey of the group's later work. There's the deliciously trippy "Strawberry Fields Forever," the impossibly catchy "Revolution," George Harrison's masterpiece "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," and a personal favorite of mine, the bluesy b-side "Don't Let Me Down." Another gem is John Lennon's strikingly beautiful "Across the Universe" pulled from the "Let it Be" album. Haunting and surreal, it's a nice segueway into the closing track, the Number One hit "The Long and Winding Road." Arguably one of the most vital greatest hits albums on the market, "1967-1970" is required listening.
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The Beatles: 1967-1970
The Beatles: 1967-1970 by The Beatles (Audio CD - 2010)
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