Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $4.11 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Beatles (20th Century Composers) Paperback – October 19, 1995


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, October 19, 1995
$20.84
$9.99 $0.01




Frequently Bought Together

The Beatles (20th Century Composers) + Revolution in the Head: The Beatles' Records and the Sixties
Price for both: $35.31

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: 20th Century Composers
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Phaidon Press; First Edition edition (October 19, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0714832030
  • ISBN-13: 978-0714832036
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,897,873 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Do John Lennon and Paul McCartney really belong up there in the Serious Music pantheon with the likes of Alban Berg, Igor Stravinsky, and Richard Strauss? The editors of the Phaidon 20th-Century Composers series obviously think so. What's more, author Allan Kozinn makes a strong scholarly case for the Beatles, who in a stunningly short time moved from fairly basic, four-chord ditties to musically sophisticated compositions that hold up well to the present day. Kozinn, a classical music critic for the New York Times, is also a long-time Beatles aficionado who knows the difference between the stereo and monophonic versions (sometimes an extra "woo" creeps in) of the early songs. He appreciates them both as pop phenomenon and musical pathfinders, and his writing is consistently top-notch. As with all the Phaidon books in this series, there are no musical examples given, but Kozinn does a superb job within the restrictions of the series' format. Beatles fans will want to own this one, and classical music lovers interested in understanding the phenomenon might also give it a try.

From Publishers Weekly

What? Another book about the Fab Four? Kozinn, a classical music critic for the New York Times and author of Mischa Elman and the Romantic Style, avoids another repetition of facts already known about John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr by focusing more on the music and less on the personalities. Yes, there is the history?the group's Liverpool roots, and the long hours spent at all-night Hamburg dives?but Kozinn gives real insight into the influences of Chuck Berry, Roy Orbison and skiffle bands. While Kozinn notes that the Beatles generated "a perfectly balanced, freakishly rare form of musical and personal chemistry," he also shows how Lennon, McCartney and Harrison grew farther and farther apart as composers, each developing his own voice, each making his own experiments. Kozinn is also master of the small details. Abbey Road was supposed to be called Everest; the original lyrics to "Yesterday" were "Scrambled eggs/ oh lady, how I love your legs." Most important is the author's descriptions of the songs. The Beatles released about 10 hours of music, the author says, with nary a loser in the lot. Kozinn is a thorough, persuasive guide through the Beatles' musical bridges, crescendos, odd bars and dialogue loops?for the most part without the snappy, shallow patter of too many rock critics. Photos.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By David L Glenister on January 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
First off - this book is not a biography. It's an analysis of the Beatles compositions and recordings, with the aim of explaining what makes the Beatles' music unique and important in music history. The book quotes Leonard Bernstein's often-stated opinion that Lennon and McCartney were "the Schuberts of our time". The book treats them as such - important composers / singers / musicians.
I've read approx. 15-20 books on the Beatles, and as a composer myself, this is the most interesting I've read. Why? Because the author understands *music*, and the structure of compositions. This is clear from the very beginning.
He only focuses on the Beatle's "story" as subtext to the changes in their music. So don't expect lots of arguments pro / con McCartney taking over the band with Sgt. Pepper's, whether Ono REALLY broke up the Beatles (she didn't - that's naive and awfully simplistic).
These events / changes are only background fodder for discussing the music. I find that incredibly refreshing.
So what you can expect is what makes the harmonies sound so amazing, or rhythmic influences, compositional trends, growth in lyric-writing, depth of instrumentation, the musical contributions of George Martin, etc.
And I've read the previous reviews posted here, and have to say: This author isn't pro-Lennon and anti-McCartney. Even while complimenting a particular Lennon melody, he writes words to the effect, "...which is interesting because Lennon is not known for being a great melodist, at least not as long as McCartney is around."
He also references the fact that McCartney was (by far) the best musician in the group, and also a better lead guitarist than Harrison, although he says it as gently as possible.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By C. Cleveland on February 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
Kozinn's book is a competent summary of the Beatles' performance and recording career, and is refreshingly calm and balanced in its discussion of the causes for the Beatles' disbanding. It's a safe book for the relatively uninformed to read. But it fails in its stated intention of getting at the "mechanisms" of the Beatles' innovative genius. Although Kozinn is genuinely appreciative of Lennon's genius, the book commits the common sin of dismissing McCartney's contributions as a sort of idiot savant knack for commercial melodies. Without getting more than about 20% McCartney into the Lennon-McCartney mix, you really can't get a grip on the songbook or the remarkable recording revolution these two young men were responsible for. A more accurate title would have been "John Lennon and Other Musicians."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Beatles Examiner Steve on April 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
Kozinn brings an interesting perspective to his book on the Beatles. He is a well-known classical music reviewer for the New York Times. But, at the same time, he's also been the Times' Beatles reporter for many years. He also has interviewed members of the group on a number of occasions. This book is one of the best analytical studies on the Beatles and their music you'll find. Well worth getting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Zed Franklin on November 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
Not only is Allan Kozinn a fantastic music critic for the New York Times, but he's also a Beatles expert! His supple writing style is a joy to read and his research is thorough. Well worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By paula brochu on July 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is serious look at the development of Beatles music and what influenced it, currently being used in college (Beatles) courses that include NYU, written by Allan Kozinn, Culture Reporter and Beatles specialist of the New York Times (for over 35 years). Few Beatles scholars surpass Kozinn in knowledge and experience regarding the topic. Uniformed readers have suggested Kozinn did not accurately address the cause of the Beatles break up in this work. This book is not intended to be a sensationalistic look at the Beatles, but an academic look at the development of their music, and what influenced it. Kozinn is a serious Beatles collector and historian who few Beatles scholars equal. He has interviewed Paul McCartney numerous times, Ringo, Yoko, George Martin and numerous people in the Beatles' small circles. He has unreleased audios and full manuscripts of these interviews. What he knows of their break-up, comes from unchallengeable sources. A second critical view claiming Kozinn's preference of McCartney to Lennon, as indicated by the choice of cover art (written by a man who did not like something Kozinn wrote of him in a review of his work for the Times), is wrong on two counts: Kozinn does not alter the facts, nor does he prefer Lennon to McCartney. He never hesitates to credit Paul where credit is due -- in addition to his musical talent -- for being the impetus for their success, the driving force behind their productivity, his social and media savvy, his winsome personality and kindness toward the press when interviewed, etc. This book, regarding the way the music branched off, into the more avant garde, is credited largely to Lennon. Paul himself, says it -- he even credits Yoko for her influence in moving them toward more daring projects. And for the record, the cover art (for both printings) was chosen by the publisher, not the writer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Malissa on January 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a great read. The book came on time and the book was in perfect condition, just like it was described as. Thank You!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?