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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars; judicous, well presented and substantive
My review addresses if this is a good book and worth reading, rather than to air my own political and social views. This is always difficult with a work that covers a controversial topic or a controversial figure. When, say, Glen Beck or Anne Coulter on the right and Michael Moore or Bill Maher on the left launches a book, there will be a flood of reviews from supporters...
Published on July 17, 2011 by Peter G. Keen

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39 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Starstruck, Selective Account of a School Reformer Who Struck Out
Michelle Rhee hit the corrupt and incompetent District of Columbia school system in 2007 like a bunker-buster bomb - a tireless reformer appointed chancellor by new mayor Adrian Fenty to "do what's right for the kids." But by late 2010 it was she (and Fenty) who had been blown up, having alienated every key ally: parents, bureaucrats, teacher's unions and...
Published on June 12, 2011 by T. I. Farmer


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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars; judicous, well presented and substantive, July 17, 2011
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
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My review addresses if this is a good book and worth reading, rather than to air my own political and social views. This is always difficult with a work that covers a controversial topic or a controversial figure. When, say, Glen Beck or Anne Coulter on the right and Michael Moore or Bill Maher on the left launches a book, there will be a flood of reviews from supporters or opponents of their views and it then becomes difficult to assess the book rather than the issue.
The questions I try to answer in my review are:

1. Is this a good book? Definitely 4 stars here. It is judicious in its judgments and clear in its analysis and conclusions. It's well crafted. One of the elements I most like is that while it is strongly supportive of Rhee, as it progresses and he has established her as a real and caring person, he adds layers of criticism and queries about how she operated. He lets Rhee express herself with him as the shrewd observer and doesn't try to build her up or give his own picture. It's very well done.

2. Is it reliable? Yes. I live twenty miles outside DC and, being an ex-elementary school teacher and ex-DC resident, followed the Fenty-Rhee story fairly closely. The book seems very accurate and balanced in its details and does enough justice to all the parties to provide an informed and sound narrative. It holds back a lot on the seamy aide of DC politics. Mayor Gray, who could have been portrayed as the villain of the piece, is perhaps too fairly treated. Within just months of his becoming mayor, there has been a nonstop flood of scandals, police investigations, accusations of bribes and diversion of funds, vote-buying, and all the regular mess of the city. It does deal what appears to be a breakdown in the editorial direction of the Washington Post, several of whose outstanding Metro columnists came after Rhee big time, with often dubious portrayal of events and some vey one-sided opinionating. If anything, the author's downplaying of the DC open air political lunatic asylum helps bring out the issues of education - he avoids colorful sidetracks and melodrama that could have made the book more of a popular best seller and "controversial." It makes the book quite low key, reasoned and reasonable, all of which are distinctive merits.

3. What makes it special? This could have been a local story of conflicts and personalities at one extreme or a dreary policy wonk-laden tome on education. It is well-positioned as a story and definitely makes one think. It's resonant and convincing - this is the world of our kids ion a system that just about everyone agrees has become more and more dysfunctional. Rhee took a clear and bold stand. Though she was dumped - sorry, she resigned - she made some major changes and much of what she put in place has been continued. Since the book was published, her successor who has been her long-time and closest colleague has continued just about all her major initiatives and just last week laid off over four hundred teachers for poor performance, mostly under the IMPACT program agreement Rhee put in place two years ago. 300 teachers rated as highly effective for two years in a row are being given base salary raises of up to $25,000 and are eligible for bonuses of another $20,000. Chancellor Henderson looks very effective, with two frequent comments being made in the media: Rhee's initiatives seem to have taken hold and maybe if Rhee had had her tact and patience perhaps she would still be there.
Michelle Rhee is certainly controversial and she brings out strong reactions. Mine are positive but the rights/wrongs of her controversial term as Chancellor of one of the worst school systems in the nation is not a reason either to read or ignore the book. It raises questions that are important regardless of where you stand. In particular, it poses the core issue of whether the problem is the kids and their background or the teachers and their unions. She took over the position through what was very much a go for broke move by the new mayor, Adrian Fenty, who won his election on the promise of a fresh face, new generation leadership and so on. He ran into many problems largely of his own making - losing tough with the community and being labeled as arrogant and dismissive - and his support in the community eroded badly. Rhee became both the lightning rod for much of this opposition and the core of the next mayoral campaign, which he lost. The winner had made it clear, albeit elliptically in public statements, that Rhee would have to go. She resigned and has moved on to a national stage as an advocate for school reform.

At the core of her plans was and remains her belief that the problem in schools is not the children and the culture of poverty, gangs and unemployment they live in. the far deeper cause is the resignation of so many principals that nothing really be done and that the best the schools can do is get by. DC is not exactly known for clean government and the schools plus the massive bureaucracy it has created has for long been a source of patronage jobs and notorious inefficiency and corruption. Even basic administration is a mess, with buildings in chaos, a lack of even basic record keeping even on attendance records and employee levels, waste and diversion of Federal funds, and in many instances schools in a state of semi-chaos. It also has a very strong teacher's union, opposed to teacher evaluations and dismissal for poor performance.
Rhee built her turnaround with a very tough personal style that is often seen as the main reason for the opposition to her. She is clearly an aggressive leader who engenders strong loyalty, and she built a dedicated team. She sought out and promoted new principals and held them accountable, often brutally so. There was very much a my way or the highway flavor to her relationships with principals who faced a daunting task and in some instances were just not quite strong enough to win through; she seems to have left some of these to sink or swim and didn't provide a lifejacket. She put scores on standardized tests at the center of her planning, monitoring and rewards. She went after the bad teachers, of whom there are many. She tried to win support from the unions for her firings and school reorganization by negotiating a contract that gave very substantial merit raises to the best performers; an agreement was eventually reached. She was decidedly not tactful in her public positions as she became a national figure with raves from Oprah, a documentary film and the infamous magazine cover of her as the witch with a broomstick. A major and still ongoing debate is whether she was on the right track but with the wrong personality. DC test scores improved, though again there are many people who question the data, even to the extent of accusations that Rhee herself "manipulated" the figures that first brought her to attention as a teacher in Maryland. DC politics is dominated by a rich of racial and social issues and both Fenty and Rhee were seen as favoring the white liberal elite at the cost of a community that has many valid complaints about gentrification, a right to the city jobs that keep them afloat - and the schools. Some of these were used, inexcusably in my view, as weapons against her.

All in all, this is a strong 4-star rating, not quite a 5 only because many readers may not be interested in the local DC issues. But this could be a tale of Chicago or other cities with somewhat dubious politics and major needs for school reform. Is Rhee the talisperson (is that a real word?) for leadership in school reform but it is worth reading the book just to answer that question. In many ways, if Rhee couldn't turn the system around it is very unlikely others could. Do our schools need radical reform and if so does that demand an aggressive rather than consensual campaign? This book may help you decide.
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39 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Starstruck, Selective Account of a School Reformer Who Struck Out, June 12, 2011
By 
T. I. Farmer (Edmonds, WA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
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Michelle Rhee hit the corrupt and incompetent District of Columbia school system in 2007 like a bunker-buster bomb - a tireless reformer appointed chancellor by new mayor Adrian Fenty to "do what's right for the kids." But by late 2010 it was she (and Fenty) who had been blown up, having alienated every key ally: parents, bureaucrats, teacher's unions and politicians.

Richard Whitmire's short, starstruck book sets out to explain how and why, but makes the mistake of falling in love with its subject: rationalizing her callous tactics, blaming others for her errors, and admiring the friction she created even though it finished her.

Rhee blew into her job like a slash-and-burn CEO hired to save a failing company, firing hundreds and disdaining help from veterans. She was right about the need to clean house. But she was also a political naïf who thought consensus was for wusses, picked pointless fights compulsively, ran over potential supporters, dismissed people and policies she didn't like as "crazy," never bothered to appreciate the District's delicate racial politics, and got off on shameless self-promotion. (She posed for the cover of Time magazine and numberless other press ops, and "gave good quote" ad nauseam to national reporters.) She professed compassion for "the kids," but showed none for adults; Rhee invited a PBS camera crew to roll tape while she fired a principal, an act of almost incomprehensible cruelty.

In Whitmire's telling the relatively young and inexperienced Rhee is so utterly self-assured, so scornful of opponents, and so inclined to treat everyone in her path as a speed bump, you start to feel you would not care to have much to do with Rhee even if you shared her goals. Perhaps more acutely than Whitmire himself, we see in Rhee the obnoxious certitude that is a nasty trademark of certain American liberal social engineers. ("You need a centralized capacity to be able to do quality control," she insists to Whitmire, although decades of failed government social programs suggest exactly the opposite.)

The author, however, is firmly in Rhee's corner. He completely omits a major test-score scandal during her tenure: Rhee promised cash prizes for higher scores, and in 2008 Whitmire's own former paper, USA TODAY, found strong evidence of grade-sheet tampering by bonus-hungry administrators. Rhee's successor opened a corruption probe.

"The Bee Eater" is marred by more than adoration for Rhee. Clunky writing, confusing narrative gaps, and missing details abound. There's no account, for example, of the primary election in which Mayor Fenty (and, by connection, Rhee) got trounced. Whitmire ping-pongs around the timeline, disorienting the reader with glancing references to events years in the future or reintroducing characters from a hundred pages ago.

He's especially erratic on Rhee's upbringing and personal life - very interested in her forceful Korean parents, but barely mentioning marriage and divorce in offhand, where-did-that-come-from? fashion. Strange, given that Rhee's second husband is Sacramento mayor and former NBA star Kevin Johnson... and Rhee was once accused of helping to cover up sex-scandal charges against him. A less mesmerized author would have at least explored that episode for more clues to Rhee's character.

Rhee was indisputably right about the lamentable D.C. school system. But what "The Bee Eater" proves, on purpose or not, is that take-no-prisoners bunker-busting tactics, in D.C. or any crisis district, are mostly fruitless. Today Rhee has insulated herself from the tumult of urban politics as head of a private non-profit advocacy group, StudentsFirst, where she can push for reform, self-promote, and earn a nice donor-funded living without having to cooperate with anyone, answer to taxpayers, or generate real results using their money. As such both her risk and her influence are diminished. Probably best for everybody - except the kids she claims, relentlessly, to put first.
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24 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page-turning narrative about Rhee's efforts to fix DC's failing schools, February 16, 2011
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
This is a gripping tale; I could not put it down. The book chronicles the massive challenges Michelle Rhee encountered when she took on the job of turning around the Washington, D.C. public schools. Rhee's bold moves and brash style shocked the city and Whitmire describes the stakes, the politics and the explosive, fast-paced story in stunning detail. There's plenty here for Rhee critics to contest, and if you are one of those critics you're probably not going to find much to like in this book. Whitmire is clear about his admiration for Rhee and his belief that her dramatic actions were badly needed. If you're not sure what you think about Rhee, or you are among her legions of fans, there's a lot here for you to consider. The book includes interviews with Rhee's family and colleagues, revealing details about her childhood and early career that offer important insights into her style and personality. She's a clotheshorse and a big eater. At the end of the book, just days away from resigning, Rhee is interviewed by Whitmire for the last time. A big bag of greasy French Fries and a jumbo cupcake sit uneaten on her desk as she juggles her phone and her Blackberry. It's a lasting image of a fascinating personality whose next moves will be equally interesting to watch.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting and powerful, February 19, 2011
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C. W. Sherwood (Southern California) - See all my reviews
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This is must reading for anyone who's passionate about education reform in the United States. Although the author admires much about Michelle Rhee, he's also clear about her failings and how those wound up costing her her job (and the mayor's who appointed her.) Although I'd read extensively about Rhee before this, I learned much I didn't know before. Some of the insights are fascinating, such as why Rhee failed to win support from the African-American community, despite demonstrable results in improving the quality of education for children in the district.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and Frustrating!, August 20, 2011
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
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I've been a teacher for over 25 years so I found this book extremely interesting. While the incompetence I have personally seen doesn't come near the incompetence of the D.C. schools, it doesn't surprise me. It does frustrate me when you see the self-serving components of "education as usual" defend the current failing system and work so hard to prevent real reform from happening. Especially when the victims are the children, and the victors are politicians, poor teachers, and teacher unions.

This book appears to be a well-balanced description and on what happened when Michelle Rhee tried to improve the D.C. schools. I write "appears" because just like the author explains in his book, we, like the D.C. voters are at the mercy of a reporter's agenda and integrity. I tend to think he is telling it as honestly as he can because although the overall message is a positive one about Rhee the author does include a significant amount of criticism of her as well.

This is a must read for anyone who wants to know why so many schools are failing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is hagiography and propaganda. So why do people believe a liar and her close friend?, December 22, 2013
By 
Inky Winkings (Warshindin Dee Cee) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
We know that Michelle Rhee has been a liar from her first days in the education business, and Whitmire claims to be her personal friend, but never calls her to account for her untruths and errors, but merely parrots the 'party line' of the billionaires that fund her and him.
There is no acknowledgement that even on her own terms, i.e. machine-scored multiple-choiced standardized tests, she failed.
And lied.
I'm really sorry I spent money on this book. However, I felt I had to read it to see what flavor of nonsense this Dick, Whitmire, would write about his friend.
I'm also sorry that some people fell for it.
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19 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent book on important subject, February 10, 2011
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This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
The Bee Eater is a well written book about a subject vital to all of us- the education of children. The author discusses in detail not only the life of Ms.Rhee but, more importantly, the problems,disappointments and successes she had with her efforts to improve the Washington D.C. public school system.

The retention of substandard teachers by the school administration and Ms.Rhee's trials to have those teachers terminated make good, even suspenseful reading.
It is a tragic loss to all education and the betterment of public schooling in our nation's capitol that she was forced to resign.

I recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the future of our country which depends on our having an educated electorate.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you're an educator, read it!, February 22, 2013
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The book successfully covers how Washington, D.C.'s Chancellor of public schools, Michelle Rhee, rose through the educational ranks to take on the country's worst urban school system. It details her courageous four year tenure, her "in-your-face" attitude to improve the schools despite turning off many parents, councilpersons, and union leaders , and the reasons for her eventual dismissal.
The book is not one-sided; it examines Rhee's considerable talents as well as her faults.
For me, the imprint left by the book is: is the chief goal of educational administrators to give children the best education possible no matter what, or to protect the jobs of those who work for educational institutions?
I wonder how often administrators say the former but in fact do the latter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Michelle Rhee: "It's Not The Kids!", June 14, 2011
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
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When I first considered reading The Bee Eater, by Richard Whitmire, I thought this may be a children's book. A quick look at the book cover seemed to confirm my first impression and so I almost passed it by. Then I saw the subtitle: MICHELLE RHEE TAKES ON THE NATION'S WORST SCHOOL DISTRICT. This book is ultimately about children, but it's no children's book, that's for sure.

The book focuses on the efforts of Michelle Rhee, a young Korean-American college student, who decides to become a contracted elementary school teacher through the Teach for America program for a few years, until she decides what she really wants to do. Her first assignment is to a poor urban school in Baltimore where she quickly learns that teaching, even at the elementary school level, is much more difficult than she ever imagined it would be. Through her own dogged commitment and exceptional creativity, Rhee comes to realize that the students, their neighborhood environment and ethnicity are not to blame for the school's abysmal academic performance, even though that is the prevailing opinion of the teachers, administration, and teacher's union. "It's the kids! They just don't want to learn."

SPOILER ALERT: There may be plot information beyond this point that some readers may not want to know. If so, stop now or continue reading at your own risk.

According to Rhee, the condition of the entire D.C. school district was due to the lack of quality teachers and administrators who possess what she calls "snap" (a strong desire to improve themselves so they can adequately educate their students, preparing them for their futures). This launches Rhee into a career as an education reformer as well as the numerous political battles which result from her strict methodology.

Michelle Rhee is hired in 2007 as district chancellor with a mandate from the mayor to reform and improve America's worst school district, Washington D.C. She uses her past teaching experiences, organizational skills, unflappable temperament and a belief that schools fail because of inadequate, low performing teachers and principals. Never one to back down from a challenge, Rhee fires the majority of the teachers and replaces them with new, trained and motivated teaches. She also closes and consolidates failing, under-populated schools. This bold move doesn't endear her to a large part of the community, the city council, nor the Washington Post. But the measurable and demonstrated academic improvements are undeniable. Predictably, the atmosphere becomes politically charged rather than educationally motivating.

In the 2010 mayoral election, the mayor who had staked his political life on dramatic improvement in the D.C. schools is defeated and Rhee leaves. But the reforms begun by Michelle Rhee continue, albeit with a less publicly visible and dramatic chancellor at the helm. The ideals installed by Michelle Rhee are still there: An emphasis on teacher quality, retention based on performance rather than tenure, a performance-based salary system and a strong emphasis on recruiting new teachers who view teaching as more than just a job.

In his final interview with Rhee, the author asked her what was the legacy of her term in the D.C. Public Schools. She replied that through "IMPAC [her teacher evaluation system], we would have removed the lowest performers and professionally developed those who need to improve their practice. As a result of those two things--rewarding the best and moving the others up or out--four years from now we would have one of the strongest teaching forces of an urban district." After reading this engaging and informative book, I have little doubt this may have happened.

I'm not sure what I think about the author's involvement in this unauthorized biography. At times he seemed too easily swayed toward complete agreement with what Rhee and her group was doing. Considering the complexity of the problems in D.C., it would seem a more critical eye would have been appropriate and expected. There were a few times when Whitmire did focus a mildly critical eye on some of Rhee's failures, although these critical moments were definitely few and far between. I think it was in his summary at the end of the book when he was most critical, mostly, I think, because it was Rhee's mistakes that had led to her early departure from the school district.

I'm sure there are others who would disagree with Rhee's plan and actions, but this book (and my review) is about Michelle Rhee and not all the other possibilities that could have been implemented. So far, there is a lot of talk about the problem with our American schools, unfortunately, no one seems to have stepped forward with a clear plan for how to solve the problems. All the while our children languish in schools that are distracted with other matters, leaving our without the excellent and challenging education they deserve.

One very pleasant surprise was added to this book. Unlike other books of this kind, the author added footnotes and included an 18-page End Notes section and a nice Subject Index, too. I wish the footnotes had of been included at the bottom of the page noted, but just having them was such a surprise that I will refrain from further complaints. These additions are great for those fact-checkers in the audience.

So, why is this book titled "The Bee Eater?" Well, you will just have to read the book to find out.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Whitmire's account of Michelle Rhee's attempt to take on "the nation's worst school district" suffers from its one-sidedness., July 3, 2011
This review is from: The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District (Hardcover)
Not since reading Diane Ravitch's The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice are Undermining Education have I seen such seemingly blatant bias in a book. The inside front dust jacket shows Whitmire's true feelings: "The Bee Eater chronicles the extraordinary life and work of the dynamic and controversial school reformer Michelle Rhee." Although I am a fan of Rhee, Whitmire's extreme pro-reform/anti-union bias and fawning over his star subject turned me off as much as Ravitch's extreme anti-reform/pro-union bias did. Ravitch supporters will likely pan this one while Rhee's will pan that. The author states, "This book is not an authorized biography but Rhee did make herself available for interviews." Even without her official blessing, Rhee's willingness to provide interviews, her parents' to provide family photos, and the posed cover photo of Rhee confirm her support. Another annoyance: the title. Most readers likely aren't aware of the related anecdote and even if they are, that fact adds little to prospective readers' desire to choose the book (I'd have gone with something like: The Reformant). The story goes like this: Whitmire provides some biographical information (upbringing, education, marriage) on Rhee, now 42; shares what sparked her interest in teaching, she experienced a life changing moment when (p 22) "she saw a PBS documentary on Teach for America." What she saw in the film compelled her to become a TFA corps teacher; recounts her (brief) career as an educator, Rhee claimed that (p 37) "after two years, 90 percent of her students were scoring at the 90th percentile on national reading and math tests. Only two years earlier, when they first started with Rhee, they were scoring on average at the 13th percentile level;" however, "Classroom-level data that could prove or disprove those claims are unavailable;" includes her involvement in The New Teacher Project, and chronicles her time spent as D.C. Schools' Chancellor, all the while putting a positive-as-possible spin on things.

When D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty chose Rhee to become the chancellor of D.C. schools in June of 2007, he gave her a huge amount of dictatorial power, which she used took full advantage of in an effort to improve the educational system. (p 84) "The first four years of reform targeted two priorities: human capital, the bureaucratic term for putting effective principals and teachers into schools, and special education." In support of her beliefs, like: (p 116) "The best teachers...should earn the top salaries, the worst teachers should get pink-slipped immediately, and the weak teachers should get extra help-and then be fired if they fail to improve;" (p 132) "What's good to Rhee? If [principals] arrive at their previous with 20 percent of students reading on grade level and when they left, the number was 70 percent;" (p 188) `"Every child in a District of Columbia public school has a right to a highly effective teacher-in every classroom, of every school, of every neighborhood, of every ward in this city. That is our commitment;"" she went on a staff firing spree unlike any other in modern history and offered the teachers' union a contract that allowed educators to earn higher salaries based on performance if they agreed to give up tenure. Whitmire spells out one of the problems with the current public education system, (p 123) "Teachers, unlike most U.S. workers in the private sector, are rewarded not for effectiveness but for time served and graduate degrees earned, a formula that guarantees odd outcomes." Similarly, (p 59) Joel Klein says, "The whole education system is built on three pillars of mediocrity: lockstep pay, life tenure, and seniority...Until we build it on a foundation of performance, accountability, and excellence, we won't succeed." Wendy Kopp, TFA founder best (in my mind) explains one of the problems with public education, in which, in many cases, failure is blamed on pupils' socioeconomics, (p 36) "If you're a teacher in a class of kids who are far behind, and you put them on a level playing field you know what the rest of America doesn't know, which is that this is not a function of kids' lack of motivation or the fact that the parents don't care. This is clearly that the kids have not gotten the opportunity they deserve, and you realize that this is a solvable problem, that this is within our control. And once you realize that, you can never leave it-your sense of responsibility for solving the problem is just massive."

Unfortunately, Rhee's apparent strong arm tactics sat no better with parents and politicians than it did with educators, in spite of the fact that: (p 124) "...when [Rhee] arrived in D.C. just 8 percent of the school system's eighth-graders were proficient in math, 12 percent in reading-and yet 95% of the teachers received satisfactory or better ratings" partly because (p 129) "Seeing their neighbors, relatives, and friends get fired from teaching and classroom support jobs, one of the few avenues to a middle-class life, didn't go down easily" and (p 197) "White voters through Rhee was cleaning house; black voters saw no reason to sweep out a head of household with a steady paycheck." Based on the book, her downfall appears to have gone something like this: With the best of intentions (improving students outcomes) in mind, Rhee lost her job (when the mayor lost his) because of: perceived racism, (the teacher pool, thus many of those she fired, were African American), sensationalism (she tried to support firings en masse by pointing out that some, which turned out to be very few, of those who she let go had engaged in criminal behavior), and overstepping (trying to move one of the schools with higher performing students from good to great, when many felt she should have focused on lower performing schools). She may have done better by attempting to obtain a higher level of buy-in, made more of an effort to better understand her customers, and showed more appreciation for the many good to great teachers whose dedication, commitment and skill tend to be overshadowed by the behavior of a significantly smaller pool of bad apples. Although I'm a fan of Rhee and her reforms, I'd have preferred Whitmire's account of her 3.5 years as chancellor of D.C. schools to be less one-sided. Better: To Sir, with Love by E.R. Braithwaite; Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire by Rafe Esquith and Stand and Deliver (1988).
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The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District
The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District by Richard Whitmire (Hardcover - February 8, 2011)
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