The Beginning of the End

October 31, 2011 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
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4:50
2
5:50
3
6:01
4
5:52
5
5:09
6
4:41
7
4:29
8
5:07
9
4:37
10
5:26
11
5:30

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 31, 2011
  • Label: Rixa White
  • Copyright: 2011 Rixa White
  • Total Length: 57:32
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0062F4DL4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 16, 2012
Format: MP3 Music
Rixa White, also known as the man in white is a talented pianist, electronic keyboardist, and composer who is devoting his talent to creating albums of music under the aegis of Silentaria. This is New Age Music and in a marketplace where so many albums claim to be in this field, Rixa White is clearly the most sophisticated. His compositions are rich in variations of color and rhythms and harmonics, so much so that at times the listener is transported to an arena where there seems to be a full symphony orchestra and chorus.

Rixa White's eleven tracks create gentle themes transporting the listener on a journey of self-actualization, inner thought and peaceful insight, while focusing on pure experience of life, beyond conceptual words and beliefs. The tracks included on this album have signifiers for identification, and areas follows: Emerge, The Beginning of the End, Return of the Lost, The Ruined Innocence, Lament of Being, Beyond Destiny, One Last Quest, Hidden Utopia, It's time to go, Farewell, and Eastward. The music require the listener to set aside time alone, time when the mind can be cleared of all extraneous information, and simply release to the experience that pours out of the speakers. This is a purging time and an enriching one. And we all need what Rixa White and Silentaria offer. Grady Harp, July 12
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Chambers HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on July 15, 2012
Format: MP3 Music
Having previously reviewed Rixa White's album "What's Real?", when I was offered the opportunity to review "The Beginning of the End," I was happy to do so. My personal music library is a bit heavy with music from the 1940s through the 1970s, but I do listen to a lot of contemporary music, including New Age electronic music. To me, New Age has been a mixed bag, with some I really enjoyed and play often, and some I didn't care for at all.

"The Beginning of the End" is one of the former. I enjoyed the album very much. The eleven tracks ranged from gentle, easy listening to relentless, driving beats. "Beyond Destiny" was one of my favorites, with a spirited boldness. "One Last Quest" was another very upbeat sound. Balancing these were softer tracks like "Return of the Lost." The sounds were mostly instrumental only, although "It's Time to Go" had some quirky synthesized voices that were audible.

In some of the New Age synthesized instrumental albums that I've sampled, after listening to a few tracks, the music begins to take on a sameness, where the different tracks sound like minor variations of the others. Not so with "The Beginning of the End." Each piece had its own identifying uniqueness that made it recognizable from the others. The album includes some of the most complex and rich electronic music that I've heard. For a single artist to have produced such sounds must have been an enormously challenging undertaking, but in the end, it works.

Highly recommended for all music lovers, with kudos to Rixa White for a tour de force performance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James W. Durney TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 7, 2012
Format: MP3 Music
As a music junkie, I do not wish to be cured of my addiction. Supporting my habit is a large CD collection from Renee Fleming to Ricky Skaggs.
When approached to review this artist's second release, I went to their website and listened to the samples. Intrigued,
I accepted a download code. Based on that review, they offered this release to me for reviewing. Both releases are a collection of unique instrumentals.

The music is different but not different bad way. The music is outside of the standard we normally listen to, making this a different experience.
As you listen what could be miscellaneous noise will develop a structure creating a track that captivates as it emerges. T
his music, by design, produces a discernible change of moods. The tracks run from relaxing to almost jarring.
The result is interesting, somewhat quirky, very different and enjoyable.
I give this five stars because it is a unique listening experience that I find moving.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Godly Gadfly on August 21, 2012
Format: MP3 Music
After being completely wowed by Silentaria's sophomore effort, "What's Real?" (2012), I was fortunate enough to be able to listen to and review their first album, "The Beginning of the End" (2011). I soon found myself recognizing some of the melodies and hooks that later made their way into the second album, with arguably greater maturity there, and more of a raw edge here. The final track "Eastward", for example, shares much in common with "Echoes From The East", the track that closes out "What's Real", both drawing on the rich tradition of instruments from the Middle East, infused into the world of electronic synthesizers.

It should come as no surprise to identify some recurring musical themes, since the two albums are deliberately intended to function as a set, which focus on a journey to the inner world. Much of this story is closely linked to the philosophical roots underlying Silentaria's work, namely the philosophy of emptiness, about which you can read more on the official website.

While the two albums do have much in common in terms of style, they are also very much independent works. It has to be admitted that the early sounds of Silentaria don't quite live up to the excellence that would later turn into "What's Real?". Yet they certainly show the promise of things to come, and the first album is still well worth listening if you're a fan of the second. Being a child of the 80s, my musical tastes were very much shaped by innovative synthesizer composers like Michel Jean Jarre and Vangelis, as well as groups like Enigma in the 1990s, and so it should be no surprise that I have a ready appreciation for the genre of this style of music.
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