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The Art of Being Straight

15 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

After John takes an entry-level position, Paul, an executive at the firm, takes a special interest in him. Although John always swore he was straight, he soon ends up in Paul's bed, and his world is turned upside down.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Johnny Ray Rodriguez, Rachel Castillo, Jim Dineen, Jared Grey, Jesse Janzen
  • Directors: Jesse Rosen
  • Writers: Jesse Rosen
  • Producers: Jesse Rosen, Amy Wasserman, Laurence Ducceschi, Ursula Camack
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: E1 Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: March 9, 2010
  • Run Time: 70 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0030GBSV6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #101,024 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Art of Being Straight" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Clare on July 2, 2010
Format: DVD
Having read some of the customer reviews I was eager to watch this movie, especially after having seen the numerous awards given to the film at gay festivals throughout the world. I must in all honesty say I am unsure as to why any such award would have been given in the first place, as the movie was far from convincing. If anything it was a tired reflection of what could have been excellent. in a single word, it was 'dull'.

The main actor Jesse Rosen was okay (and this is perhaps the best word to describe his acting), although I found his portrayal of inner conflict to be furtherest from the truth. Anyone who has suffered the trauma of an internal war, torn between sexual ambiguity and societal normality, would know that this is far more intense than that shown in this portrayal. The idea of such conflict however would resonate with many, in that a relatively good looking young man, with a sincere and proven confidence in his ability to attract and conquer the opposite sex, is suddenly thrown into intense conflict as a result of a new sexual awakening and attraction to a man. This man is his boss, who despite the intentions of the writer (whom I suspect intended the boss to be good-looking, sexually confident and almost predatory in his sexual ability to attract others), was in my opinion quite hopeless. Had the scenario played itself out in the world (where most of us reside), his boss would have been the subject of a sexual harassment suit quicker than the taking of an instant photograph. He was almost lecherous, and far from the seduction it was intended to be.

Quite frankly a young man in Josh's predicament would never have been seduced in this way by such a man.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bob Lind on December 27, 2009
Format: DVD
Jon is a 23 year old who moves from the East Coast to Los Angeles, leaving behind a girlfriend and hoping to start a career in photography. He moves in with his younger brother and his college friends, and proceeds to impress them as the "ladies' man" the proud brother claimed. Jon accepts an entry-level job at an ad agency. To Jon's own surprise, he is not completely taken aback when his boss makes a pass at him, and that first experience makes him consider that he might actually be gay.

A parallel plot concerns Jon's college pal Maddie, working at a job she hates in a gallery, and in a relationship she is unsure about with another woman. When an interesting young man moves in next door, Maddie wonders what a relationship with him would be like, which further creates a riff between the two women.

Whenever I see one name as the writer/director/star, my initial reaction is "Uh, oh!" ... since that is rarely a wise move. Jesse Rosen (who plays Jon as a young man whose self respect is based primarily on others' opinions of him) actually does a fairly good job with this admittedly-simplistic storyline, especially considering the limited budget he had to work with and a largely inexperienced cast ... but I do feel a more experienced director or screenwriter could have made this a much more credible and useful film. As it stands, it illustrates some confusing dilemmas about sexuality and coming out, points out how modern lingo (his young roommates use "gay" as a synonym for lame, and trash-talk each other as such) can hurt someone dealing with such issues, but really doesn't come up with anything new, pretty much just ending the film without closure. Despite its shortcomings, it is a commendable effort, easy to watch, and the open-ended conclusion might spur some discussions among viewers. I give it four stars out of five.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Long Story on April 3, 2010
Format: DVD
I usually run from gay-themed films written, directed, and acted in by the same person. Jesse Rosen has proven the exception. With unusually high production values for a small-budget film, Rosen tells the story of a young man in transition. The actors in the major and minor roles (but especially Rosen, Pete Scherer, and Rachel Castillo) deliver wonderfully believable, sensitive, and subtle performances. There are no moral or didactic lessons here, and, like life itself, little resolution . . . just a beautifully told short story. Jesse Rosen as a writer, director, and/or actor will be someone whose work I will follow.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By The Troll Under the Bridge on June 21, 2012
Format: DVD
There is a type of movie one comes across ever so often where the film begins nowhere and ends nowhere. Yet, the in-between part has something to say in such a way that we understand this small piece of the main character's life. The Art of Being Straight sort of begins nowhere and definitely ends nowhere. Unfortunately, the in-between part of the equation says nothing. There is a lot of mumbling. People appear and disappear. What I took to be a subplot, the story of the lesbian friend, turned out to be better explored than the story of the main character. The actor playing the male lead only portrayed his feelings through fidgeting with his hair and looking at objects around him. He also mumbled his lines. Good grief. If the audience doesn't know what is being said, what's the point of presenting a story?

The turmoil one feels when trying to define and accept sexual orientation is a very serious thing. There are times when the balance of being gay and walking the line of appearing straight are necessary in today's society. This struggle would make an interesting film. Unfortunately, this screenplay danced around the issues. We only get vague hints about what the guy is feeling. As I understood the film, the fellow never made up his mind about his sexual identity. That's sad. For me, the whole project is flawed through a sense of cowardice.

If a person is gay but decides to live a straight life, so be it. I respect the decision made. If a person admits he is gay and will not hide that part of who he is then I applaud him for that decision. For the guy in this movie, so upset over who he is and yet not being brave enough to make a decision, I just wish there was that one person in his life who would tell him it is OK for him to be himself whatever that means. The compassion of friends can go a long way in helping us heal the wounds we carry on a daily basis. This fellow needed such a friend.
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