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The Berry Bible: With 175 Recipes Using Cultivated and Wild, Fresh and Frozen Berries Paperback – June 22, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (June 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935597124
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935597124
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.4 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #722,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review


Amazon Exclusive: Tom Douglas Reviews The Berry Bible

Tom Douglas is an American chef, restaurateur, and writer. He is well known for helping to define Northwest cuisine and igniting the Seattle restaurant scene, winning the James Beard Award for Best Northwest Chef in 1994. Since 1989, Tom has opened five of Seattle's most popular restaurants: Dahlia Lounge, the Greek-inspired Lola, Serious Pie pizzeria, Palace Kitchen, and Pike Place Market's iconic seafood restaurant, Etta's. He also owns Dahlia Bakery, famous for its Triple Coconut Cream Pie.

Tom is the author of Tom Douglas' Seattle Kitchen, named Best American Cookbook by the James Beard Foundation, Tom's Big Dinners, and I Love Crab Cakes! He bested Masaharu Morimoto in an episode of Iron Chef America and was named 2008 Bon Appetit Restaurateur of the Year. Read his exclusive guest review of Janie Hibler's The Berry Bible:

Washington State is berry country. Every summer for a brief but glorious window of time, my Seattle restaurant kitchens overflow with berry abundance--first the sweet local strawberries, then blueberries, red and golden raspberries, boysenberries, blackberries, and finally, the wild huckleberries we buy from foragers, treasured in the restaurants for syrups, jams, and sauces. Berries are the sweet source of many purple-stained memories, like picking wild blackberries with my daughter, Loretta, when she was a kid, and slamming out hundreds of summer berry crisps after hours in the Palace Kitchen one year for the Bite of Seattle.

That’s why I’m delighted by this AmazonEncore edition of Janie Hibler’s Northwest classic, The Berry Bible. A bible it is indeed--every berry under the sun is included here, from cloudberries and currants to cape gooseberries and salmonberries. Read up on the history, habitat, and health benefits of each berry before diving into the recipes where berries are used in every course, from soups and entrées to drinks and desserts... even barbecue sauce.

Janie has studded the book with berry-relevant stories, anecdotes, and folklore. You can pick up some fabulous facts along the way. Did you know it takes 80 pounds of raspberries to make one 375 ml bottle of Framboise?

My wife Jackie and I like to put up a batch or two of my Mom’s easy freezer strawberry jam (right on the back of the pectin box!), but I think Janie’s excellent chapter on berry jams, jellies, pickles, and preserves will extend our repertoire this summer.

Now I’m going to head out to the deck with a Strawberry Mojito in one hand and my Berry Bible in the other to solve the big question--which dessert recipe to try first? I’m leaning towards Peak of the Season Blueberry Pie, but The Perfect Strawberry Shortcake sounds mighty fine. --Tom Douglas


Recipe Excerpts from The Berry Bible




Delicious, good for us, but underrepresented on our tables, berries are one of nature's greatest gifts. Amending our lack of berry-smarts, Janie Hibler's The Berry Bible presents a definitive guide, with over 200 recipes using cultivated, wild, fresh, and frozen berries--from well-known types such as blueberries and raspberries (and their related varieties), to lesser known kinds, like the cloudberry and manzanita, and apple-like fruit enjoyed traditionally by Native Americans. The recipes cover a wide range of easily produced dishes, such as Morning Glory Muffins with Blackberries and Pork Tenderloin Salad with Warm Strawberry Dressing, and also include formulas for smoothies, cocktails, condiments like chutney, and homemade berry liqueurs such as Madame Rose Blan'’s Crème de Cassis. What makes the book a particularly valuable kitchen resource, however, is Hibler's A to Z berry encyclopedia, a section that, in addition to providing nomenclature, history, habitat, and classification information, also offers picking, buying, storing, and cooking advice. Accompanying the descriptions are pages of color photos that further aid in berry identification, a gift to those who like to gather their own. --Arthur Boehm (from the Hardcover edition)

From Publishers Weekly

From the essential raspberry to the uncommon jostaberry, Food & Wine and Gourmet contributor Hibler sings the praises of the bountiful berry, many varieties of which are indigenous to North America. Without getting too scientific, Hibler explores the history of the berry, how and where it is cultivated and the differences between each variety. She highlights berries' versatility and adaptability, making references to each fruit's cooking capacity as well as its health benefits. Divided into two main sections, the book serves foremost as an encyclopedia of buffaloberries, salmonberries, strawberries and everything in between, listing common names, storage information and other particulars. The second half is an eclectic collection of recipes for beverages, salads, game, pies and more. Forget strawberry jam and cranberry sauce-Hibler offers a refreshing look at a fruit often relegated to pancakes and syrups. Adventurous chefs will be inspired to jump-start their next party with Strawberry Mojitos, followed by Mango-Raspberry Soup and Sauteed Chicken Breasts with Blueberry Port. For dessert, they may want to go out on a limb with Almond Gooseberry Cream Pie, or just play it safe with Peak-of-the-Season Blueberry Pie. Incorporating the berry into both sweet and savory dishes is what Hibler seems to do best, and her recipes are straightforward and well-explained. 8-page full-color photo insert not seen by PW.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Award-winning cookbook author, cooking teacher, and frequent magazine contributor, Janie Hibler, was a founder of the International Association of Culinary Professionals and served as president from 1999-2000. She was also a founding member of the Portland Culinary Alliance and served as its first president.

Her published cookbooks include Wild About Game (Broadway Books, 1998), winner of the James Beard Foundation Award, Best Book Single Subject 1999, Dungeness Crabs and Blackberry Cobblers (Alfred A. Knopf, 1991), a 1992 James Beard Awards Nominee, Fair Game (Irena Chalmers, Inc., 1983), a 1984 Tastemaker Awards Nominee, and The Berry Bible (William Morrow, 2004 and AmazonEncore, 2010), a 2005 James Beard Foundation Award Nominee.

She was selected as Fiale des Etats Unis (Woman of the Year) in 2006 by the Academie Culinaire de France, the American chapter of French Master Chefs.

In 1996 she helped update the game chapter in the newly revised Joy of Cooking. Among the magazines for which Janie has written are Gourmet, Food and Wine, Ladies Home Journal, Bon Appetit, Woman's Day, Sunset, The Oregon Magazine, Northwest Palate, Cuisine, Fine Cooking, Cooking Light, Country Living, Mix and Every Day With Rachael Ray.

Janie has taught and lectured extensively on game cooking and the food of her native Pacific Northwest. Having been director of the Kitchen Kaboodle Cooking School and the Discriminating Palate, she has since conducted cooking classes in Portland, Seattle, San Juan Island, Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boston, and has appeared on television in New York, Atlanta, Salt Lake City, Connecticut, Seattle and Portland. In 1992 she was a selected speaker in a program titled, "Cook America: Our Culinary Heritage," at the Smithsonian Institute. In 1995 and 1998 she was hired by the state of Oregon to orchestrate a dinner at the James Beard House to showcase the food and wine from the Pacific Northwest.

She has been a spokesperson for the Oregon-Agri-Business Council, and since its inception, an active committee member working to establish a year-round Portland public market. Janie has recently been appointed by the Director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture to serve as the Public Member on the Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission.

Customer Reviews

I thought the recipes that were soups and smoothies took up a lot of the space and I just don't feel like those are things one needs a recipe for.
Summer B. Frace
The habitat and distribution section will give you a really good idea of which species and cultivars you may find in a true `local sources' farmers market.
B. Marold
Indeed, the first 77 page section of this book is a full-fledged "Berry Encyclopedia" that includes information about berries from all around the world.
pixels and bits

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on June 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Thirty-five years ago `The Berry Bible' by Janie Hibler may have attracted a place in a relatively small market of hippies, vegetarians, and Pacific Northwest berry boosters. Today, I suspect the book will and should attract a lot more attention with the discovery and publicizing of the health benefits of all berries, specifically cranberries and blueberries.
Even though I easily qualify as a `cookbook collector', I have never given much thought to what constitutes a good book for a cookbook collection, as my primary objective in acquiring cookbooks is to review them. But, this book easily qualifies as a paradigm for an excellent member of a cookbook collection. The two most interesting types of volumes in cookbook collections, I think, would be books on specific regions such as Provence, Tuscany, Mexico, and The Philippines and books on specific ingredients such as potatoes, duck, salmon, and eggs.
So, once we start collecting books on ingredients, what should they include? The most obvious answer is recipes. For these, a book on berries has much more to offer than a book on eggs or potatoes since, aside from the relatively small variations between starchy and waxy potatoes, there is not much to tell about how to make the best use of different varieties. There is also not much room to capitalize on recipes that can serve many purposes by being a stage for a wide variety of color, species, and cultivar of product. A good berry recipe can give you recipes for muffin, scone, tart, coulis, or smoothie for blackberries, raspberries, and mulberries in one fell swoop.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By S. D. Fischer VINE VOICE on June 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love eating berries and cooking with them so I was pleased to add another berry-centric cookbook to my collection. Unfortunately, the book is not the encyclopedic reference that it is portrayed to be. Many of us who grew up with a prized set of encyclopedias enjoyed (and learned from) the illustrated maps and photos.

There is not a single photo in the entire book. The chapter entitled, "The A- To - Z Berry Encyclopedia" describes more than 30 types of berries and would have really benefited from a photo of each one to help readers identify them in the store and in the field.*

The format is not user friendly. Recipes are listed one after another so that many, if not most, are on two pages (rather than beginning each recipe on a new page). I find it much easier to use recipes when the ingredients and instructions are on one page so I don't have to flip back and forth (especially when I have flour or berry juice on my hands). The author bolded the ingredients and yield rather than the title for each recipe so it is more difficult than it should be to find a specific recipe (especially since there is no index). At least one recipe (Summer Water) is presented in an essay format (rather than with a list of ingredients followed by the instructions).

If you are mainly interested in facts on berries, this book could be a good choice. The information on berries in the Berry Encyclopedia chapter is very thorough. For each of the 30+ types of berries, the author provides the common name, scientific classification, habitat and distribution, history, where it is grown commercially, how to pick it, how to store it, and notes for the cook.

If you are primarily interested in berry recipes, I have a few alternate suggestions from my cookbook collection.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By H. F. Corbin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This beautiful book has everything going for it and tells you everything you ever wanted or needed to know about berries. Ms. Hibler discusses in great detail 35 or 40 berries-- many of which I was not familiar with-- along with color photographs of twice that many. About each berry she discusses their common names, scientific classification, habitat, history, where they are grown commercially, how to pick them, how to buy them, how to store them, along with notes for the cook. On cranberries she tells the cook: "Think of them as the lemons of the berry world. Their tartness acts as a flavor enhancer when they are mixed with other fruits or berries, bringing out the best in both." On blueberries: "They are good mixed with other fruits and nuts, especially almonds."
In the author's introduction she discusses the current problems consumers face in the market. Although berries are now available the year round, we have sacrificed quality for quantity. (Do you ever wonder how growers get those tasteless strawberries bigger than a baby's fist?) She points out that many berries are picked while green and will never taste right when they do ripen. She further states that if we are willing to pay more for good berries for a shorter length of time in the market, that the sellers will do what is necessary to sell berries. But it is left up to the consumer to alleviate the problem.
Ms. Hibler covers utensils, cream, dried berries, washing berries, etc., in a chapter she calls "Berry Basics." Then the recipes follow.
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