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The Best Sports Writing of Pat Jordan Hardcover – April 14, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Persea; 1ST edition (April 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0892553391
  • ISBN-13: 978-0892553396
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,526,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Jordan debuted as a sportswriter in the late 1960s after a short stint as a minor-league baseball pitcher, which he chronicled in his acclaimed memoir A False Spring (1975). Through the years he has written for such magazines as Sports Illustrated, GQ, and the Atlantic. Jordan’s profiles of athletes, both famous and obscure, are unlike those of any other journalist working today. His eye—and ear—for the telling detail provides extraordinary depth and insight into his subjects. A 2001 interview with Roger Clemens is especially fascinating given the recent steroid controversy swirling around the legendary pitcher. A 1997 profile of late basketball superstar Wilt Chamberlain reveals the insecurities and borderline paranoia that dogged the man throughout his life. Young basketball star Bobby Hurley’s career was effectively ended by a devastating car accident. Jordan guides readers through Hurley’s physical and emotional rehabilitation, constructing, in the process, a remarkably resonant coming-of-age saga. Perhaps the most emotionally revealing piece is a 1980 dual profile of baseball star Steve Garvey and his wife, Cyndy. Nearly 30 years later, one can still feel the pain and confusion of his subjects as they struggle to juggle fame, ambition, and love. Jordan is a treasure, and this is a wonderful testament to almost 40 years of excellence. --Wes Lukowsky

Review

He is a master portraitist. -- William Finnegan, author of Cold New World

Jordan here displays his rich skills as a reporter and observer and his talent for good old-fashioned story telling. -- William Nack, author of Secretariat: The Making of a Champion

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer on May 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
First, I'm really, really enjoying the stories (I'm about halfway through the book). Jordan is a wonderful, no-frills writer with an amazing eye for the telling detail. That said, I have to dock one star for all the spelling and factual errors. In one story alone, on Whitey Herzog, he misspells the names of Garry Templeton, Dann Bilardello, Gussie Busch, and Busch Stadium, as well as placing New Athens, Illinois west of St. Louis.

In an otherwise wonderful piece on the race driver Phil Hill, he repeatedly misspells the names of two of the biggest names in racing, Hill's competitors Stirling Moss and Dan Gurney, as well as referring to those devices that stop cars as "breaks." And he calls Moss an American. I'm no racing fan at all, but even I knew how to spell Moss's and Gurney's names and that Moss is English.

That complaint aside, this is some of the best sportswriting I've ever read, nearly Angell-ic in quality.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Barry Sparks VINE VOICE on October 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been a Pat Jordan fan since I read A False Spring in 1974. The Best Sports Writing of Pat Jordan brings together some of his best work over 35 years. The articles range from a piece on the Boston Bruins which appeared in Sport in 1970 to a profile of Sylvester Stallone which appeared in Premiere in 2006.

Jordan, a master of the long profile, has written for most of the major magazines, including Sports Illustrated, The New Yorker, Playboy, Inside Sports, GQ, Reader's Digest, The Atlantic Monthly and many others.

Editor Alex Belth has selected an interesting collection of profiles, including Wilt Chamberlain, Steve and Cindy Garvey, O.J. Simpson, Whitey Herzog, Greg Louganis, Carlton Fisk, Bobby Hurley, Roger Clemens, Pete Rose Jr. and Deion Sanders.

You will learn a lot about Jordan and his writing from the book's introduction, author's note and 16-page interview with him.

Jordan is hard on his subjects, telling the brutal truth. He's a brilliant writer and astute observer.

He says his con is "Getting people to tell the truth about themselves. I want them to talk about more than they're willing to talk about."

Jordan is determined to dig beneath the surface to reveal the truths of his subject. Don't expect to like all the athletes Jordan writes about.

Described as a "writer's writer," Jordan has "a talent for revealing detail, scene and image."

You don't have to read all 26 articles to appreciate Jordan's immense talent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael N. Yotz on September 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
There are some very nice pieces contained in this collection; and it is well worth your time to read.

I don't blame Jordan for most of the errors, spelling mistakes, etc. - they should have been caught by the editor.

This book made Jordan a more likable person compared with his most recent book Nice Tuesday.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By logistician on May 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I was so anxious to read this book that I paid for expedited shipping. My excitement was spot on. This book is amazing. Pat Jordan is so honest and insightful that I felt as though I knew more about the individuals than before I read the book. There was nothing fluffy in any of the interviews. And although you wonder about the appropriateness of the story on child beauty pageants, it fits in perfectly.
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