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The Better Man (Star Trek, Book 72) Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek (Numbered Paperback) (Book 72)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 268 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket; First Edition edition (December 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671869124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671869120
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,042,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

When the planet Empyrea, a colony of genetically perfected human beings, demands that the Federation remove a science station which has been in place for nearly twenty years, the Starship EnterpriseTM is assigned to transport to the planet the Federation ambassador who negotiated with the Empyreans long ago, an ambassador who was once Dr. McCoy's closest friend, but is now a bitter rival.

On Empyrea, McCoy discovers Anna, a daughter he never knew he had. McCoy soon realizes that the isolationist Empyreans must not learn her father is an off-worlder, and that her genes are less than "perfect." As relations with the Empyreans collapse around him, McCoy must find a way to save his newfound daughter from the harshest penalty her planet can impose.


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 31, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When a mystery is central to the plot of a novel - when the plot develops because of the mystery - and then the mystery is shrugged away with barely a murmur at the end, left unsolved - one must suspect that there IS no solution, that the author had no idea who was behind the critical sabotage: that he himself, not any character, is the culprit. I was very much aware of "author intrusion" off and on as I read this book, beginning with the needless rehashing of the series episode "Amok Time" (surely every Star Trek fan *knows* that story, and readers who don't won't care!). But nowhere was I more aware of the author than at the end: I closed the book and said out loud, "What a cheat!" Weinstein never demonstrates that anyone *could* have sabotaged the Federation installation; not only that, but by having the unknown saboteur's programming escape the intense scrutiny of Spock and Scott *even after they knew that sabotage had occurred*, he demeans these characters' skills. The only true reason for the sabotage is (besides creating some tension) to provide a reason for one lone Empyrean's change of heart, and to achieve this single end, Weinstein is (I'm sure unintentionally) disrespectful to Star Trek characters and to the reader's intelligence. This is a contrived novel and one I found very disappointing: I still want to know whodunit and WHY, and I don't believe the author knows.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 2, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Raise your hands if you ever wanted to know about Dr. Leonard McCoy, the man. What's behind the sarcastic facade? Here are the answers to many of your questions. Also, who does the term "The Better Man" refer to? The genetically perfect Empyreans, or the seemingly-perfect man who Leonard idolized as a child, but can no longer stand? Either way, Howard Weinstein's novel shows us that the Better Man, whoever that is, is no better than "garden-variety" humanoids.
We also meet Anna, the daughter of an Empyrean leader and McCoy, or at least we think so... She is a teenager with normal teen-aged problems, that are remarkably similar to the ones her "perfect-gened" friends are having.
Trekkies! You cannot call yourselves experts until you read this book. If you need any further convincing, which you really shouldn't, that this is an incredible piece of writing, here is an excerpt from Howard Weinstein's "The Better Man":
Actually, I can't pick just one passage. I could do the "How may I compare you to a hormone-crazed Vulcan" scene, which is wonderful, but I'd go on for three pages at least. Then, there's the part where Elizabeth tells McCoy he's the father. Of course, there's always the passage where E.L.F. ...oops! I shouldn't give away the entire story. Do yourself a favor. Read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 12, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book has great merit in that it gives you a look at a rather tender side of McCoy that you know is there but seldom see. This is especially apparent as he fights to save a daughter he didn't know he had. He is thrown on an emotional roller coaster in the first few chapters and it doesn't get any easier by the end of the book. My only problem was that the ending just left me hanging. I wanted to know what happens to Anna. Even so, this book is definitely worth reading. I would also highly recommend Weinstein's book Deep Domain.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By SarekParks on February 27, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you love the trio, and wonder about McCoy's past, then this book is a must! Watch Spock and McCoy battle with the words they use so well, while Kirk is unusually confussed. See McCoy do as any father would to protect his little girl, who just happens not to be so little anymore. And see the dynamic trio come together in the face of danger with surprising skill as only they can, while supporting their valued friend.
This book is a must for those who love to see the trio in action within another secret that becomes news. I laughed throughout the whole book while getting insight into McCoy's past.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Yanni on March 21, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a well-written if not flawless story, paying particular attention to characterization and ideas but not without its moments of action and high drama. It's not quite good enough to get into the five star range, but only just; it wrapped up a bit TOO neatly for words, leaving one very major subplot/plot complication completely unaddressed, but it was still a very enjoyable and worthwhile read, particularly for fans of McCoy.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read that a lot of editors were uneasy about giving McCoy his own story. That is why "Probe", by another Star Trek author was re written. This one doesn't fail on any level. I have to agree with one reviewer who said it wraps up a little too neatly. However it is still good overall and I'd have to give it 4 stars. It's rare to see such a good novel about McCoy. It's not about Kirk and Spock this time. That's the best aspect about the story.

We get to see McCoy's long lost daughter. One of his rival classmates at the academy starts the Enterprise crew on the journey. McCoy's world is never the same again.....
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