The War Between the Tates: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.99
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The War Between the Tates Paperback – January, 1991

9 customer reviews

See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January, 1991
$42.70 $0.01
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Put together with such skill the effect is something glorious in its entirety and flawless under the closest scrutiny; like a fine piece of needlework" The Times "Her humour is a delight and she writes with an almost unholy relish" Irish Times "Lurie miraculously seems to understand men as well as she understands women... she constructs her American academic backdrops with the craftsmanlike skill; she evinces rare wisdom, wit, and compassion; and she writes like an angel" Sunday Times --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alison Lurie is Professor of American Literature at Cornell University. Foreign Affairs won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985 and The Truth About Lorin Jones won the Prix Femina Etranger in 1989. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: Avon Books (P) (January 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380711354
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380711352
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.2 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,799,798 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alison Lurie (b. 1926) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author of fiction and nonfiction. Born in Chicago and raised in White Plains, New York, she joined the English department at Cornell University in 1970, where she taught courses on children's literature, among others. Her first novel, Love and Friendship (1962), is a story of romance and deception among the faculty of a snowbound New England college. It won favorable reviews and established her as a keen observer of love in academia. It was followed by the well-received The Nowhere City (1966) and The War Between the Tates (1974). In 1984, she published Foreign Affairs, her best-known novel, which traces the erotic entanglements of two American professors in England. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985. Her most recent novel is The Last Resort (1998). In addition to her novels, Lurie's interest in children's literature led to three collections of folk tales and two critical studies of the genre. Lurie officially retired from Cornell in 1998, but continues to teach and write. In 2012, she was awarded a two-year term as the official author of the state of New York. Lurie lives in Ithaca, New York, and is married to the writer Edward Hower. She has three grown sons and three grandchildren.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 30, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This novel seems to be out of print again and is hard to find even in second hand stores. This is a shame because the breakup of the marriage of the prim professor Brian and his wife Erica is a fine and subtly humorous novel. The novel is set in the Vietnam era as a background to the campus setting, but it is also is part of the atmosphere that leads to a seachange in the lives of all the characters.
Brian passively allows himself to be drawn into an cheesy, self serving affair with a nubile student. One of the novels digs at colleges of the sixties is that the girl is barely literate, which is apparently no impediment to being a graduate student.
Erica, who has been a demure and dutiful wife has an intellect as sharp as her professor husband She is less than happy with the situation, but is determined to put Brain's feet to the fire on this issue. She also finds that with Brian out of the house she is able to deal with the many annoyances imposed on her by her prissy spouse, such as his insistence that she does not work on campus.
Less pleasant are her two teen children who are cleverly likened to the South Vietnamese of the day, dependant for aid on people they resent and her weedy, weird college friend Sandy, the only male available to spend time with her. Lurie's description of events are smart, satirical and just plain funny. Most importantly this is novel about change and the need and the inevitablity of moving forward.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eric Maroney on November 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I suppose if one must read one Alison Lurie book, it would be The War Between the Tates.

As I read more and more of her work, I realize that she can only write with great skill about academics or writers or both and their wives. In The War Between the Tates she most fully realizes all the other versions of this theme she has worked out in novels and short stories.

Lurie appears to be one of those literal writers who must draw upon her real life in order to create. Her imaginative capacity is severely impaired. Just look at the thin collection of stories, promisingly titled Women and Ghosts. She writes these with a singular lack of flair or talent. It is as if the writer of Tates and the teller of ghost stories are two different writers.

This does not mean that one should not read and enjoy The War Between the Tates. It has gorgeously written, penetrating prose, which work to examine all the painstaking elements of a marriage coming apart in the throes of the counter-culture.

For Cornell people it is a special treat, since Cornith University is so clearly Cornell University. Even over forty years later the novel still captures the atmosphere and shades of the place with Lurie taught for many years.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By uniforall on March 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
This was the first novel by Alison Lurie that I've read and it made a deep impression. It is very witty and humorous as are all her works but it is among the darkest. It's fine enough to have gotten the Pulitzer except that the direction of the author's sarcasm would, I imagine, be a downer for the prize-determiners. Happily Foreign Affairs, which got the Pulitzer, directs its sarcasm more across the board, for instannce at the interactions between Brits and Americans; this time the fact that the two protagonists are English professors is evidently forgivable.
All her fiction is interesting, but here is what I like best, aside from the two aforementioned novels: The Truth About Lorin Jones, The Nowhere City, Imaginary Friends.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Manola Sommerfeld on February 20, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is my favorite novel by Lurie. I love Alison Lurie because she is a genius at studying the psychology of her characters. In this book, both Tates are dissected and their thoughts analyzed, verbalized and explained to full clarity, and this makes them so easy to understand, and therefore to love or hate. My favorite part of the whole book is when Erica starts measuring the pros and cons of something in her head. Lurie is so structured in her analysis, it's almost impossible not to follow her thread. Moreover, this novel analyzes the disintegration of a marriage, and the dynamics and motivations are so universal and so timeless that they can be applied to the 60's or to the 00's alike.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The first half of this book shows a horribly plausible example of a middle aged marriage falling apart at the seams, due to chance happenings. The psychology of the husband, Brian Tate, is thoroughly and sympathetically examined - he looks like a success, but his own self-view is very different. This, and the great feeling of the palce and period (1969) are the strengths of this novel.
Its weaknesses are that it gets less convincing towards the end, and the author's rather simplistic femanism gets the better of her, particularly when pontificating on male relationships.
Overall, not one of her best, but still a good read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?