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170 of 178 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Complete KJV at an inexpensive price
This edition of the King James Bible is quite a value, both in price and in content. First, it is an inexpensive paperback, allowing those of limited means to enjoy the Bible in the classic language of the King James Version. Second, it includes the complete canon of the King James Bible as translated in 1611. Virtually all modern editions of the KJV fail to include...
Published on April 17, 2000 by Mark De Forrest

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60 of 64 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Content ! - Poor Construction )-:
I was glad to find a 1611 KJV with apocrypha. The text is easy to read and is same English used in he revised authorized KJV we currently have today. What else can I say about the content, other than it is - God's Holy Word!

I have owned my copy for 4 years, and I use it regularly. The first problem I had was the size of the book. It is so thick, it is...
Published on May 13, 2008 by Chad Carson


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170 of 178 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Complete KJV at an inexpensive price, April 17, 2000
By 
Mark De Forrest (Spokane, Washington State) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This edition of the King James Bible is quite a value, both in price and in content. First, it is an inexpensive paperback, allowing those of limited means to enjoy the Bible in the classic language of the King James Version. Second, it includes the complete canon of the King James Bible as translated in 1611. Virtually all modern editions of the KJV fail to include the Apocrypha. This edition remedies that defect, rendering this edition suitable for use by Protestants, Anglicans, Roman Catholics, and eastern Orthodox Christians, as well as others who may want access to all the literature which Christians of various stripes consider to be scripture. This Bible also contains a brief appendix including helpful information on Bible history and on the various books which make up the Bible. A great Bible at a great price!
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67 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Source of English Bible History, April 4, 2008
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This reviewer got this surprisingly low priced edition of the King James Bible (KJV) because of historical interest and to win a friendly wager. A young lady who is Protestant and this reviewer discussed the KJV, and we agreed that based on the Epistle Dedacatory,dedicated to King James I of England (1603-1625), that the KJV was an anti-Catholic Bible. However, she disagreed that the original KJV had the Aprocrypha Books which are in all Catholic bibles but not in most Protestant bibles. So, the friendly wager was made, and this reviewer won this friendly wager.

The editors' Introduction is of historical interest. There are good comments on the different arrangement of the Hebrew Bible (for Christians the Old Testament) and the Christian Old Testament. In the earliest editions of the Christian Bible,the Apocrypha Books (Judith, Tobit or Tobias, Baruch, Ecclesiasticus,not to be confused with Ecclesiastes, Wisdom, and I Maccabees and II Maccabees)were part of the Christian Bible for over a thousand years. Readers should note that for political and religious reasons, this rearrangement was made by 400 AD.

Another point the editors made in the introduction was that the KJV and other editions of the Bible were based on what might be called layers of translations. Much of the Hebrew Bible was originally written in Hebrew and Aramaic. The editors speculate that Hebrew, the oldest known biblical language, may have been introduced to the Ancient Hebrews from other Mesopotamian peoples. The first known translation of the Hebrew Bible or most of it was made between c. 287-247 BC whereby the Hebrew was translated into Greek. This translation was known as the Septuagint and exposed the Hebrew Bible to larger readership. Many of the Ancient scholars in Western Civilization knew Greek but not Hebrew.

As mentioned above, St. Jerome (346-420 AD) translated the Latin Vulgate Bible which, again, was the Christian Bible in Western Europe. The editors noted that as early as St. Jerome, the Christian Bible had already undergone layers of translations. The Catholic Church authorities, contrary to popular opinion, did not discourage translations of the Bible into vernacular languages as long as they were based on the Vulgate Bible. For example St. Bede (680-735)was working on an Anglo-Saxon translation when he died. In other words the Bible had undergone layers of translations in the early history of Christianity.

By the time of the Reformation (c. 1517-1650), there were several Protestant translations most of which had anti-Cathoic overtones. Some of these omitted the Aprocrypha, but the earliest KJV did not. The translators worked under severe restrictions impose by James I which can be found on pages xxvi-xxvii of the introduction. For example, James I stated that he wanted to word ecclesia to be translated as church(Church of England) and not congregation as the Puritans, whom James I did not like, would have it.

The introduction also shows the serious divisions among the Protestants themselves. Many of the "reformers" hated each other and their followers as much if not more than the Catholics. For example, the German Protesants who met with their Catholic counterparts at Diet of Speyer in 1529 had to be silenced due to their loud internal disputes. When the Catholic authorities called the Council(s) of Trent (1545-1663), their Protestant guests had to again be silenced. This was not so much due to Protestant disputes with Catholicism but due more so to their rancorous internal disputes. Such divisions can be seen in the Epistle Dedicatory and James I's comments on other Protestant bibles. For example the editors cite James I's remarks that the Geneva Bible, a Protestant Bible, was the worst Bible he had ever seen.

The original translators' notes are worth reading. These men had to be as accurate as they could with translating the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek while adhering to James I's guidelines which were very restrictive. The notes not only present the difficulties faced by the translators, but they are are of historical interest.

Readers should also note that some of the early KJVs had embarrassing errors. One edition of the KJV was known as the Murderers' Bible because typesetters omitted the word "not" in the Sixth Commandment about not killing (the Seventh Commandment for Catholics). Another edition was known as the Wicked Bible because typesetters forgot the word "not" in the Seventh Commandment (Eighth Commandment in the Catholic Bible) about not committing adultry. One early edition of the KJV was know as the Vinegar Bible because Christ's parable about going into the vineyard was set in type as vinegar. Yet, the KJV survived these careless errors as well as other which can be found on pages 141-143 in Father Graham's book titled WHERE WE GOT THE BIBLE.

Readers may ask why this reviewer gave this Bible a high rating. The KJV is an expression of great English Literature. The translators knew that the English language was undergoing rapid changes in the 17th. century, and they used what some call Archic English to give the KJV a permanent place in biblical literature. The verses are cadenced, and the use of the Archaic English is a pleasure to read. Younger readers may think this reviewer is old fashioned, and they may be right. However, this reviewer likes the reading of the KJV.

This reviewer also wants to correct a historical error re English translations of the Bible. Some men have argued that the Catholic Douay-Rheims Bible, an English Catholic translation, was written in response and as a reaction to the KJV. Such an assumption does not stand historical scrutiny. The Catholic Douay Rheims Bible was finished in 1609, and the KJV was finished two years later.

This reviewer highly recommends the Oxford Classics edition of the KJV. This book has interesting historical notes and a solid bibliography to attract interested readers. As a couple of reviewers stated the Oxford Classics edition of the KJV is very reasonably priced, and even though this edition is paperback, it is well bound and made to last. Readers would do well to get this book.
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60 of 64 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Content ! - Poor Construction )-:, May 13, 2008
By 
Chad Carson (Kennesaw, GA USA) - See all my reviews
I was glad to find a 1611 KJV with apocrypha. The text is easy to read and is same English used in he revised authorized KJV we currently have today. What else can I say about the content, other than it is - God's Holy Word!

I have owned my copy for 4 years, and I use it regularly. The first problem I had was the size of the book. It is so thick, it is almost cube-like in appearance. The thickness makes the book cumbersome to handle. Second, the paperback binding is weak. The entire Gospel of Luke has liberated from the binding. I have glued it back several times. Each time a few more pages come loose.
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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The original KJV, April 30, 2002
It's nice having because it contains the complete King James Version of the bible as it was originally translated and published. It is one of only two published editions of the complete KJV that I have been able to find. Very few people seem to realize that the KJV included the books of the Apocrypha.
I wish that they made this available in a hardcover without the Michelangelo on the cover though.
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78 of 88 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent yet secular edition, January 8, 2004
This edition presents the famous King James translation of the Bible wrapped in a scholarly and quite secular package. The book starts with an introduction to the history of the biblical canon as well as the history of the King James translation. The fact that the edition is liberal shows through when they do not talk of the KJV as some inerrant truth but as an excellent yet flawed and ideological.
Then, the entire KJV is reproduced with its well-known features: an introduction which describes the spirit and method of the translation, a summary of the each page's contents at the top and an interesting rendering of words which were inserted by the translators to make the reading more smooth in italics.
This edition includes the Apocrypha (the books that were considered deutorocanonical and eventually removed from the KJV Bible) - another feature that the more religious readers may find objectionable. However, to present a scholarly overview of the Bible, this is a must, especially as the Apocrypha is almost the length of the New Testament. To portray historic continuity, the Apocrypha is placed in between the two testaments.
The volume ends with notes on each book in the Bible, in the order of this edition. It is here that the naturalistic and historical point of view is best seen. However, religious readers will find plenty of points of interest here as well.
Due to the completeness of the edition, it's almost like a stand-alone intellectual presentation of the Bible.
Great value as there's so much content and unless you're a very devout believer this edition is perfect!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Kindle version with typos on every page, among other problems!, June 19, 2011
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Frankly, it is very disappointing to find out that Oxford University Press could be so careless in formatting their King James Bible for the Kindle. Not only are there typos on virtually every page (or screen, if you prefer), but the index is not user friendly, and the reader has to scroll through all chapters of a book before moving on to the next book. For example, for moving from Psalms to proverbs, you have to scroll through 150 lines! It would have been much easier, and reader-friendly, to have a primary index with book names only, and a secondary one (once the reader selects a book), with chapter numbers.

I'll be glad to remove this negative review after OUP fixes all the typos and makes a new, two-tiered index for the Kindle version of their Bible. In the meantime, I feel this is the only way to express my disappointment. And while I'm at it, I must say I'm disappointed with Amazon as well, since there do not seem to be any quality standards for books formatted for Kindle. (And I say this as a longstanding customer and a big fan of Amazon.)
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A KJV With the Apocrypha, August 25, 2005
By 
Caesar M. Warrington (Aldan, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Few people realize that when the Authorized Version (known today as the King James Bible) was printed in 1611 it included those books which Protestants refer to as the Apocrypha. A KJV with the Apocrypha is a rare find nowadays.

That's what makes this paperback edition from Oxford University Press so neccessary. It not only includes the Apocrypha and the original translators' preface but it is also compact and quite affordable.

The only drawback to this edition would be the absence of annotations and crossreferences. Otherwise, this is an informative and enjoyable edition of one of the greatest works of English literature, printed as it was originally intended to be read.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended for Bible students, July 13, 2005
The KJV has taken some flack in recent decades, with the charge it is a poor translation. However, such charges are made by etnocentric readers who ignore semantics shift over time.

Now, I will admit that I am a "centrist" when it comes to scripture, as I do not believe in scriptural and prophetic inerrancy, but the Bible is indeed divine and the word of God, regardless of some mistakes and errata in modern publications of the Biblcal text, including the KJV.

I enjoyed this edition as it contained the Apocrypha. I am a Latter-day Saint and my Church, though it uses the KJV, doesn't accept the Apocrypha as canonical. Having ready access to these books allows one to have a better graps and exegesis of some Biblical texts, such as Jesus' discussion of the 7 men who were married to the same woman - intertextuality exists between this passage in the synoptics and the Book of Tobit.

Recommended for Bible and theology students.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, affordable textbook., March 31, 2005
For those who already own a Bible, don't use the Bible on a regular basis, or who don't own a King James, the Oxford World's Classics is a good pick. It delivers the reader the complete King James text with Apocrypha, a must for any library.

It is increasingly difficult to find King James Bibles with the apocrypha. Theological issues aside, this is unfortunate because of the King James' immense literary, historical, and cultural value. This Oxford paperback makes these "rare" texts available at a low price.

The volume has two potential drawbacks. First of all, this paperback is too big for its own good. My copy is still reasonably new and some of the pages are already starting to slide out. If you're thinking of making this your "regular" Bible to read every day and cart to Church, you may want to pass it up for something more durable. But if all you want is a complete copy of the King James either for reference or a single read-through, this is a good choice. The format and commentary suggest that this volume is meant as a "text book" intended for people who know little of the Bible or who are studying it in a college class, rather than a personal Bible for daily use.

The essays and commentary, while brief, are engaging, lucid, and informative. They do, however, suffer from an occassional and rather grating irreligious arrogance which seems inappropriate for a Bible commentary. There is mention, for example, of "a world of intertextuality unimaginable to holders of dogmas of inspiration" (p. 322 n.4). The writers would be surprised, no doubt, to find that a great many holders of such dogmas are fully aware of the Bible's intertextuality and even revel in it. The editors show more knowledge of history and criticism than of theology or current religious trends, which is fine, but they also seem to lack any respect for religion, which is not. On occasion, the writers' attitude even leads them into error or distortion, and so the commentary should be taken with a good pinch of salt.

This may be the only "study" version of the King James with Apocrypha. Even well-learned laypeople are likely to learn something from the explanatory apparatus, and this translation is an important one to have available.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Low quality printing, October 20, 2009
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This review is from: The Bible: Authorized King James Version (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
This is a comment solely on the physical quality of the book: it is awful. The print gets smeared instantaneously when you touch it. The margins are too narrow - not enough to scribble anything in them, and definitely not enough room to keep your fingers in the margins so as to avoid putting them on the easily smudged print.
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The Bible: Authorized King James Version (Oxford World's Classics)
The Bible: Authorized King James Version (Oxford World's Classics) by Stephen Prickett (Paperback - May 15, 2008)
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