Qty:1
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by MovieMars
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Sealed item. Like NEW. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.95
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Big Parade
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Big Parade


List Price: $14.97
Price: $9.96 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $5.01 (33%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
29 new from $7.17 8 used from $5.96
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$9.96
$7.17 $5.96

Frequently Bought Together

The Big Parade + WINGS + Hell's Angels
Price for all three: $34.75

Buy the selected items together
  • WINGS $14.51
  • Hell's Angels $10.28

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: John Gilbert, Renee Adoree, Claire Adams, Hobart Bosworth, Karl Dane
  • Directors: King Vidor
  • Writers: Lawrence Stallings
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, NTSC, Silent
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: October 1, 2013
  • Run Time: 140 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00D9BNONW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,075 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

The highest-grossing silent film of all time, as well as the first realistic war drama, tells the harrowing story of a young man's (John Gilbert) front-line experiences in World War I. Year: 1927 Director: King Vidor Starring: John Gilbert, Renee Adoree, Claire Adams, Hobart Bosworth, Karl Dane

Customer Reviews

One of the best silent movies ever.
C. Mamary
Who would dare question or criticize the film's depiction of The Great War - either in an historic or dramatic context?
Casey62
Overall the picture quality is excellent and they did a great remastering job on the film.
Robert Badgley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Casey62 on October 1, 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
King Vidor's 1925 WWI epic, THE BIG PARADE was one of the most important Hollywood productions from the entire silent era. It put MGM on the map as a prestigious studio, catapulted John Gilbert to major stardom, and set the quality standard for war films in years to come. Made a scant 7 years after the armistice, THE BIG PARADE contains an inherent, honest authenticity that demands respect and admiration from anyone watching it today, 88 years after its release. Who would dare question or criticize the film's depiction of The Great War - either in an historic or dramatic context? Indeed, it's practically like we're watching a documentary from that time, whether it be the spot-on, chillingly realistic battle vignettes or the sincere, sensitive romantic scenes between John Gilbert and his French sweetheart played by the charming Renee Adoree.

Warner Home Video's Blu-ray Book Edition of THE BIG PARADE has been fully restored from the original camera negative, and the result will take your breath away. There's nary a speck to be seen in the immaculate 4k scanned, 1080p resolution transfer, which includes all the original tints. The outstanding full orchestra score is by Carl Davis, and integrates popular WWI tunes like "Over There" and "You're in the Army Now" with ominous crescendos underscoring the action sequences.

The special features are a collector's delight: a handsomely illustrated 64 page book with notes by historian Kevin Brownlow, an audio commentary by historian Jeffrey Vance with excerpts from King Vidor, a half hour short from 1925 called "Studio Tour", and the original theatrical trailer.

This cinematic landmark definitely ranks as one of the major vintage home video releases in recent years, and belongs on the shelf of any self-respecting classic film buff, right next to the Blu-rays of WINGS (1927) and ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT (1930).

My highest recommendation.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
47 of 54 people found the following review helpful By mwreview on September 23, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
The Big Parade is a lengthy film but, for the most part, it is lively and fast-paced. At the beginning, I thought the film was the classic tale of a naive, spoiled rich kid (played by the great John Gilbert) drawn to the battle field by the parades and glamorization of the war. It is so much more than that. The main character, Jim Apperson, acually adjusts to soldier life very well. He quickly acquires two close buddies (played by Tom O'Brien and Karl Dane), demonstrates impressive innovation and ambition (creating a shower out of a barrel) and--of course--gets a French girlfriend, Melisande (played by Renee Adoree).
The first half of the film is a bit slow at times, although the antics of O'Brien and Dane provide comedy relief that is often hilarious (especially Dane's character). It is definitely worth the wait when Jim's unit goes off to battle. Melisande desperately clings to Jimmy not to leave (symbolism that foreshadows Jim's ultimate fate). Once on the battlefield, the fighting scenes are as well-done as any I've seen on the First World War. The troops slowly move through the devastated landscape, preparing for the next sniper attack. The three buddies end up in a trench together and spit in a target to decide who will go over the top and take out a German machine gunner (the WINNER goes over the top), Jim goes after a German he has wounded in order to finish him off and then finds he is unable to when he sees that his enemy is just a young kid. When Jim realizes the horror of war, only one thing really matters: the French girl he left behind. He must find her again! The film is one of the funniest, suspense-filled, and touching films I've seen (yes, it's all those things and more). Give it a try!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By ixta_coyotl on December 27, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
In many ways, King Vidor's The Big Parade did for WWI films what Oliver Stone's Platoon did for Vietnam War films: it brought home the realities of the war in a fashion that better represented what had actually happened. In the process, it is thoroughly entertaining: scenes of typical silent melodrama are quickly replaced by serious thematics (eg, "patriotic" mob peer-pressure & bursts of nationalist fervor), fun male-bonding scenes, wonderful light romance and comedy, and finally, compelling and often very realistic scenes of warfare. The film is full of marvelous subtle allegorical references (eg, "mother knows best" comes to mind) and plays-on-words (the curse-rhyming soldier songs make one think of the title, which rhymes with the French-originated "charade"). I cannot praise this film highly enough for its modern story-structure and production values, which were eons ahead of the times.
I agree with the previous reviewer who said that the Big Parade does not best The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, primarily due to its later arrival, its more narrow theme, and the fact that John Gilbert was not Rudolph Valentino. But I do feel that in a funny way it completes what that film was trying to do; namely, by filling in its two greatest weaknesses: its reliance on silent melodrama and its lack of time dedicated to the actual horrors of fighting the Great War. Thus it is a perfect complement to that film.
As interesting trivia, both stars died shortly after the silent era came to a close, Gilbert of alcoholism/heart failure and Renée Adorée of tuberculosis. The actor who played Slim, a Dane, shot himself in the head after the talkie era had reduced him to selling hotdogs outside the studio, making his fate in the film all the more eerie...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category