The Birdcage 1996 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(1,200) IMDb 6.9/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, Nathan Lane and Dianne Wiest lead the laughs in this wild comedy that insists you don't have to be a woman to be a mother.

Starring:
Robin Williams, Gene Hackman
Runtime:
1 hour 59 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

The Birdcage

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Product Details

Genres Comedy
Director Mike Nichols
Starring Robin Williams, Gene Hackman
Supporting actors Nathan Lane, Dianne Wiest, Dan Futterman, Calista Flockhart, Hank Azaria, Christine Baranski, Tom McGowan, Grant Heslov, Kirby Mitchell, James Lally, Luca Tommassini, Luis Camacho, André Fuentes, Tony Gonzalez, Dante Henderson, Scott Kaske, Kevin Alexander Stea, Tim Kelleher
Studio MGM
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the funniest, best movies ever made.
molarman
My parents and I watch this movie about once a year and still enjoy watching it every time.
MoonX
This movie will make you laugh no matter how many times you watch it.
La Divina M

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Jose R. Perez on June 9, 2002
Format: DVD
American audiences flocked to this remake of the French classic, "La Cage Aux Folles" - perhaps the funniest comedy ever released in ANY language. It's no surprise that the US viewer could easily lose his or herself in this laugh riot, especially with the incomparable Robin Williams and Nathan Lane in starring roles. Lane is delicious here as the top billed female impersonator and star at Birdcage, a drag extravaganza club owned by his better half Williams. While Williams tones down his Mork routine and actually softens as a result, as funny as he his, Lane steals the movie, with a warm, knowing performance that ranks up there with STeve Martin in "All of Me" as one of the best comedic works ever on film. Dan Futterman (brilliant in "Urbania") plays Williams' son with the right mix of charm and apprehension, while Calista Flockhart (yes, Ally McBeal herself) is strong as his fiance. And that's Hank Azaria (of "The Simpsons" and the ex-Mr. Helen Hunt) as the butler, in a HYSTERICAL mode. Gene Hackman is a hoot as the bride-to-be's right-wing Jesse Helms-like character...and his final scene in drag (think Robert Preston in "Victor Victoria" mixed with Martin Landau in "Ed Wood") alone deserved Oscar consideration. Both Hackman and Lane were robbed at Award time, unlike Ugo Tognazzi (who played the Robin Williams role in the original) who scored an Oscar nomination for Best Actor. Williams doesn't come close to achieving Tognazzi's utter sincerity and charm, but the movie works regardless.
If you've seen and enjoyed the "Birdcage" do yourself a HUGE favor - suspend all fears about reading subtitles and rent thyself "La Cage Aux Folles" (part ONE, not part TWO, which is a poor continuation.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Graham D. Lincoln VINE VOICE on February 18, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
You will laugh until your sides hurt and you will rewind scenes two or three times ! This film is loaded with catchy phrases and scenes that keep popping into your thoughts and make you giggle, despite your attempts to think of something-else. You will never forget the Butler / House Boy....ever--"Agadore Spartacus" steals scene after scene, as (Robin Williams) struggles to maintain his sanity and composure, while fending-off Emotional Outbursts and Episodes of Self/Relationship Doubt from his transvestite Partner, (Nathan Lane). The plot revolves around "their" son getting married and not being able to deal with certain "issues," concerning his "parents." He is marrying (Alley McBeal), whose parents are Right-Wing Politicians.... thus, the "Issues."
I have seen "The Birdcage" many, many times & I know children love the movie (they will watch it repeatedly). Couples will find lines from the film invading their daily conversations. When I watch it, with my girlfriend, we have weeks of fun from one viewing! This is just one of those fun-filled, hilarious films, that even homophobic men can't resist. You will laugh, Nathan Lane will cry....and you will do poor imitations of "Agadore Spartacus" for weeks afterward. Enjoy !
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38 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Alphia D. Larkins on November 8, 2001
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One of the funniest movies that I have seen in ages! Robin Williams is not the funny one here, it is Nathan Lane's character, Albert, that gets the most laughs. This movie has made me a life-long Nathan Lane fan. Both Williams (whose character is Armand Goldman) and Lane play gay men, with William's role being the dominant or male character. Since I am not gay, it is hard for me to define gender definitions of gay couples, but in this movie, there can be no missing the fact that Lane is the female side of the couple. When William's son comes to tell Dad of his impending marriage to a young woman (played admirably by Calista Flockhart) and to plead with Dad to pretend to be straight when he meets the girl's parents, as her father is a very straightlaced Senator in D.C.(played by Gene Hackman),trouble starts, in the form of hurt feelings and feelings of rejection to the other member of the relationship, namely, Albert. All kinds of solutions are considered to try and work him in to the charade, but he is so blatantly what he is, a gay man who is a female impersonator, but more female in his real self image than he is male, then it is nigh on to impossible to have him pose as an "uncle" or any male person, though he does try to adapt, with a few lessons on "maleness" from Armand, but he is incapable of being anything other than what he is, so they don't know what to do with him, how to explain him, and he refuses to just go away and be quiet until the wedding is over.
The ensuing struggle between the characters to remain true to who they are and each other, and yet not mess things up for the young couple is hilarious! The supporting actors are as good as the stars in this movie.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 30, 2003
Format: DVD
This one of very few films which I find more entertaining each time I see it again. (The others include Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Singin' in the Rain, and Young Frankenstein.) Directed by Mike Nichols, working with a script written by Elaine May, its major characters are Armand Goldman (Robin Williams), Albert Goldman when not performing as "Starina" (Nathan Lane), Senator Keeley (Gene Hackman) and his wife Louise (Diane Wiest), and Agador Spartacus (Hank Azaria). Most of those who have seen this film since it appeared in 1996 probably know that it is (somewhat) based on La Cage Aux Folles, a play written by Jean Poiret and then a film directed by Edouard Molinaro. (Actually, knowing all this neither adds to nor detracts from what Nichols and his associates achieve.) In fact, the basic dramatic situation can be traced back more than 2,000 years to classical "comedies of error."

The plot line is rather straightforward. Val Goldman (Dan Futterman) informs his gay parents that he is in love and intends to marry the Keeleys' daughter, Barbara (Calista Flockhart). Most of the film focuses on a celebration dinner party in the Goldmans' home, above their nightclub, The Birdcage. Nichols brilliantly manipulates the plot (such as it is) to create a series of hilarious situations in which the Goldmans attempt to deceive the Keeleys and thereby not jeopardize their beloved son's marriage. When I think of the body of Nichols' work as a director, I am amazed by his versatiulity. (Consider his treatment of marital issues in The Birdcage juxaposed with those in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? or The Graduate. Consider how much mileage he got out of the relatively thin plot in Working Girl.
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