The Black Dahlia 2006 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(283) IMDb 5.6/10
Available in HD
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Two ambitious cops, Lee Blanchard (Aaron Eckhart) and Bucky Bleichert (Josh Hartnett), investigate the shocking murder of an aspiring young starlet.

Starring:
Josh Hartnett, Scarlett Johansson
Runtime:
2 hours 2 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Black Dahlia

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The Black Dahlia [Blu-ray]

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Mystery, Drama
Director Brian De Palma
Starring Josh Hartnett, Scarlett Johansson
Supporting actors Aaron Eckhart, Hilary Swank, Mia Kirshner, Mike Starr, Fiona Shaw, Patrick Fischler, James Otis, John Kavanagh, Troy Evans, Anthony Russell, Pepe Serna, Angus MacInnes, Rachel Miner, Victor McGuire, Gregg Henry, Jemima Rooper, Rose McGowan, Luis Daniel Ponce
Studio Universal Studios
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

No plot, no acting, no story.
Todd
It looks like this movie is a pretentious attempt to seriously recreate a film noir genre, but it takes itself so seriously it fails miserably.
Elfenstone
Even if a movie is bad, I tend to sit through it just so I can say I watched the whole thing.
Miranda Doerfler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Linda Lou on August 3, 2008
Format: DVD
Even though it is still one of California's unsolved murders, the whole Elizabeth Short case can be told in about 60 seconds. So making a 2 hour movie would be quite a feat. That's why the director factored the L.A. "Zoot Suit" riots of 1943, a boxing match, the killing of black pimps and prostitutes who were minding their own business, the dysfunctional love affair between Scarlett Johansson's character and Josh Harnett's partner, a bunch of very chic lesbians, and the bizarre wealthy family of a bi-sexual Hilary Swank (does her mother have Parkinson's or is that the actress' idea of an alcoholic socialite?)

We didn't hear about the murder until 20 minutes had passed and only then because it happened on the street behind the pimp shoot-out. Somehow the "first responders" on the Black Dahlia crime scene didn't hear all of that gun fire on the other side of the building. Instead of going to the rescue of their fellow officers, they and a dozen reporters stood transfixed on the naked body in the park. So much for "Officer down! Send back-up!" The best thing about this movie was the autopsy which was done in a compelling narrative by a jowly M.E. That's about all we learned about this murder victim who was made out to be a slut who slept with men AND women in exchange for a sandwich or pair of nylons. In fact, there was not one woman in this movie who was not depicted as prostitute, golddigger, or tramp. Only the lesbians had class and dignity - and there is a gang of them! (Look for an uncredited k.d. lang in a great piece of camp.)

Hartnett has the charisma of a grape. Johansson fits right in during an era when 20 year-old women looked like they were 35. But she handles a lame role like a pro. I don't know why Swank was even in the area. And that accent!
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99 of 125 people found the following review helpful By Roland E. Zwick on October 1, 2006
Brian De Palma's "The Black Dahlia" is like a beautiful sports car with no engine under the hood: it sits there looking mighty pretty, but it never actually goes anywhere.

The movie is based on the James Ellroy novel of the same name, a highly fictionalized telling of Hollywood's most notorious unsolved murder case. On January 15, 1947, a young woman named Beth Short was found brutally slain - her body gruesomely dismembered and gutted - in a field in Los Angeles. The case became a cause celebre around the nation, with speculation rife as to the background of the victim and the identity of the perpetrator, but the actual killer was never found. The movie focuses on two fictional homicide detectives, played by Josh Hartnett and Aaron Eckhart, who, to varying degrees, become obsessed with the case. Their investigation leads them into the heart of a film noir maelstrom comprised almost exclusively of twisted psychosexual perverts and Tinsel Town sickos.

Thanks to Vilmos Zsigmond's fine cinematography and all the spiffy 1940's paraphernalia with which the costume designer and art directors have decked out the movie, "The Black Dahlia" is never anything but dazzling to look at, but in almost every other respect, the film is a monumental disappointment. Although the first half is relatively straightforward in its approach and style, by about the midway point, De Palma's trademark cinematic excesses - stilted dialogue, floridly staged action scenes, campy performances, and overemphatic music - begin to take over and the film becomes an incoherent mess.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. Combs on October 29, 2008
Format: DVD
Wow - I didn't know they still made movies this bad. I knew Brian De Palma's reputation had taken a beating in the last decade or so, but I really understand why now. This was easily the worst movie I had seen in a long time. And a warning for anyone who is interested in seeing this film because of the real Black Dahlia murder: "The Black Dahlia", the film, treats it as nothing more than a springboard and a background. The very real murder is secondary or perhaps tertiary to the silly and contrived plot, and - at least in my opinion - this film trivializes what was the brutal and gruesome death of a very real woman. I would have been embarrassed to have made a movie like this. Embarrassed, or perhaps ashamed, if we lived in a culture that could still feel shame.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By C. Valls on December 28, 2006
Format: DVD
This film should not have been titled "The Black Dahlia".

It should have been title "Josh Hartnett bangs everyone's girl / with brief appearances/mentionings of The unsolved murder of Elizabeth Short / aka: The Black Dahlia Murder"

This film barely kept me awake and interested.

I was hoping for a story based on the black dahlia murder, and what I got watching this movie was not it.

This movie is more about "the lives of the people in L.A., and the L.A.P.D. in the 40's" ... and , seriously, the murder of Elizabeth Short is used more for a "back-story."

As the previous reviewer noted, this movie has a poor ending.

I wanted so much more out of this movie, but, I was completely let-down.

Well, I guess I'll go and watch a movie where I know what to expect.

Jackass 2 here I come !!!
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