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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is good outside. Binding is tight. Cover is bright and clean, but is slightly curled. Pages are crisp and clean, but a few have reader markings and a little underlining. All in all, this is an especially nice copy.
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The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines Paperback – April 17, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0807856536 ISBN-10: 0807856533 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 552 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (April 17, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807856533
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807856536
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #656,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An important work not only to the field of Philippine-American studies, but also to the studies of race and imperialism in general."--Journal of American Studies


"Compelling. . . . The author shows impressive command of . . . the sources in the United States and the Philippines, ranging from personal papers, newspapers, and military civilian archives. . . . Highly recommend[ed]."--CENTRO Journal

Book Description

"Blood of Government does valuable work in laying out the intricacies of racial (re)formations in the service of and against colonialism. . . . This book has much to offer those interested in Phillipine-American relations as well as postcolonial studies, and, surprisingly, given its length, leaves one wishing for more."--Journal of American History

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3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shawn M. Warswick on April 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Paul Kramer earned his BA at Johns Hopkins and his Ph.D. at Princeton under Daniel Rodgers. Currently Dr. Kramer teaches courses at both the graduate and undergraduate level at Vanderbilt University. Kramer argues that in order to understand how empire makes race and how race helps to shape empire. Furthermore, his thesis is that “it was not simply that difference made empire possible: empire remade difference in the process.” (3)

The work revolves around six themes: firstly the status of the Philippines as a “twice-colonized country” and the central role of the Spanish colonial period in understanding the period of American colonialism. (28) A second theme in race-making is the Philippine-American War as “the foundational moment of twentieth-century Philippine-American history.” (28) The third theme is the role Filipino’s played in creating the colonial state. (29) Fourth is “the tension between metropolitan and colonial perspectives on empire.” (30) Fifth is dialogue between colonial administrators and Filipino political leaders about control and representation and sixth is the “intersection of the politics of colonialism, nationalism and migration.” (30-31) The narrative begins, as Kramer says, not in Washington or Manila but in Madrid in 1887 at the grand Philippine Exposition. Interestingly the author mentions how racial difference was, on the one hand, based on geography (where one was born) and on the other hand with “blood mixture. A third line of difference was based on belonging (or not belonging) to Hispanic Catholic civilization.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kramer offers a carefully crafted, well-researched interpretation of a history to which many are oblivious. It is likely too dense for the casual reader, but those with a serious interest in U.S. history will find it more than worthwhile.
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael on May 31, 2014
Format: Paperback
Poorly written book that selectively highlights some parts of Western history and marginalizes non-Western ones. The book is supposed to create an emotional reaction rather than objectively inform readers about the past events.
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