The Bloodstone Papers and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$12.19
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Orion LLC
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is lightly used with little or no noticeable damage. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Bloodstone Papers Hardcover – July 31, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0061239663 ISBN-10: 0061239666 Edition: 1St Edition

Used
Price: $12.19
16 New from $2.62 37 Used from $0.01 6 Collectible from $4.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.62 $0.01
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Ecco; 1St Edition edition (July 31, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061239666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061239663
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,501,555 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A listless part-time teacher and writer of pornographic novels helps his elderly father quench a decades-old thirst for revenge in Duncan's sixth novel (after Death of an Ordinary Man). Anglo-Indian narrator Owen Monroe, long accustomed to his quasi-bohemian lifestyle in contemporary London, has been hearing from his father, Ross, for years about the devious Skinner, the English con man who, decades before, ruined Ross's Olympic boxing dreams. Though Skinner disappeared, Ross has never given up hope of finding him, but it is Owen's chance discovery in a library (a novel by a pseudonymous author Owen and Ross believe to be Skinner) that finally gives them a lead. Posing as a literary scholar, Owen tries to arrange an interview with the author, but ends up instead in bed (repeatedly) with the author's daughter, Janet. As Owen continues his investigation, Duncan cuts back to pre- and post-partition India, where Ross, a railroad worker, first encounters Skinner and eventually becomes unwisely involved in a scheme to boost freight from a train Ross and his longtime friend Eugene work on. The plan's consequences are far-reaching for all involved and propel the novel toward a surprisingly anticlimactic conclusion. Though the narrative sometimes feels coyly deceptive, Duncan's polished, merciless and frequently hilarious prose supplies a trove of pleasures all its own. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Duncan’s polished, merciless, and frequently hilarious prose supplies a trove of pleasures all its own.” (Publishers Weekly)

“He is a major writer” (The Independent on Sunday)

“An appallingly intelligent writer” (The Guardian)

Superb...Perhaps this book will finally bring him the mainstream recognition he deserves. (Arena)

‘Richly satisfying. Duncan manages to fuse racial and personal dislocation beautifully in this long, seductive narrative....A terrific yarn.’ (The Independent on Sunday)

[A] sprawling, ambitious work…it loops back and forth through history with remarkable lucidity… ultimately very moving.’ (Alfred Hickling, The Guardian)

“A vigorous roman à ghee, reminiscent at turns of Vikram Seth, Zadie Smith and Douglas Coupland.” (Kirkus Reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 25, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been a fan of Glen Duncan for years and was really looking forward to a new book. I enjoyed this book, but not as much as some of his others. I learned a lot about the Anglo-Indian culture, and Duncan's prose was as lovely as ever, but the book lacked the raw emotionality of some of his earlier works. That may not be a bad thing. I still haven't recovered from reading _Hope_ and _Love Remains_. Altogether I'd recommend this book with the caveat that it differs from Duncan's usual style.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. McCutcheon on July 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
There are a few books that I am willing to read more than once, but this is one of those few. It's one of the few contemporary books that has depth, edginess, and charm. The main characters have a sweet vulnerability and a tenderness toward each other, and are so well drawn that it's like a close friend telling you the family story. Glen Duncan's touch is light, gentle, and human, so that even disturbing scenes (that in other books might have made me feel repulsed or angered) evoked compassion and a sad sense of intimacy, rather than revulsion. Not, by any means, a book for everyone - certainly not for anyone who views the world with a conventional or conservative moral outlook. Its morality is beyond convention in many ways - thoughtful, humane, and profoundly forgiving.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Miller on May 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
I bought this book in a Books A Million store on a clearance rack for $2. And I'm glad that's all I spent. When I read the blurb on the book jacket, it sounded great. It sounded like it would be a thoroughly enjoyable, engaging read. However, I found that it really seems to be poorly executed. The transition from past to present to past is abrupt and rough, there are things that need more details but don't have them, and thing with tons of unnecessary details. It seems to be rather slow most of the time.

Personally, I would not recommend this book to others. I see some have enjoyed it, but I was not one of them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?