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The Body in the Lighthouse: A Faith Fairchild Mystery (Faith Fairchild Mysteries) Hardcover – April 29, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Faith Fairchild Mysteries (Book 13)
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (April 29, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038097844X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380978441
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,468,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Developers and environmentalists do battle over a deserted lighthouse in Page's 13th absorbing "body" book (after 2002's The Body in the Bonfire) to feature Faith Fairchild, caterer, sometime sleuth and mother of two small children. Faith and her minister husband, Tom, who live most of the year in Aleford, Mass., are fixing up their cottage on Maine's Sanpere Island, where "mansionization"-the construction of trophy houses by rich summer people-is making the locals resentful. One evening the falling tide reveals the body of developer Harold Hapswell "wedged between two granite ledges at the base of the old lighthouse... as if he'd been filed between the two large rocks." Suspecting Hapswell's death was no accident, Faith has her worst fears confirmed when she herself is attacked on a walk near the lighthouse. Beneath the tranquil and festive summer activities, including the island-wide Fish and Fritter Fry and an amateur production of Romeo and Juliet, lurk arson and murder. Along with thematically related recipes, the author appends a moving afterword about the impact of September 11 on the novel's composition. This is an ideal beach read for cozy fans heading for the shore this summer.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

When caterer Faith Fairchild leaves the Massachusetts parsonage where her husband is pastor for a new summer cottage on Sanpere Island in Maine, she's not prepared for its woefully unfinished state. But that allows her family to stay with her friend Pix's lovely and wise mother, Ursula, who knows everyone on the island. With an environmental group fighting hard--and sometimes nastily--to keep development at bay, the apparent drowning of a developer at the foot of the picturesque lighthouse raises questions. Through a summer full of set pieces--the local theater production of Romeo and Juliet, the ancient family feuds, the natives who eschew even electricity, and the siren lure of Home Depot--another murder and other mysteries unfold. Through it all, Faith cooks, keeps her arms around her children and stalwart spouse, and gets a hefty dose of local color, recipes included. Pleasant cozy fare, although the trend of casting environmentalists as bad guys has become an epidemic. GraceAnne DeCandido
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Katherine Hall Page is the author of seventeen previous Faith Fairchild mysteries, the first of which received the Agatha Award for best first mystery, and recently The Body in the Snowdrift was honored with the Agatha Award for best novel of 2006. Page also won an Agatha for her short story "The Would-Be Widower." She lives in Massachusetts with her husband and son.

Customer Reviews

Dropped other books and read right through.
darstarr
Although the final conclusion will not be a surprise to most readers, it is satisfyingly consistent with the story line and human nature.
E. Griffin
Male readers in particular are likely to find the story terminally boring.
M. A Michaud

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I guess I don't much care for Faith Fairchild. It got a little tiresome to be reminded 10 times how slender the heroine (usually a stand-in for the author) is. Okay, okay, so you're thin! Congratulations! It got even more tiresome that her reaction to anyone with any kind of social concern was to parody or shun them as "lunatics" or "terrorists" (terrorists?!). Faith's vision and concern never extends beyond her family, except for helping out with the Concord Players (sorry, Sanpere Players). She's as eager as the "ecoterrorists" to pull up the drawbridge and let no one else settle in Sanpere, yet doesn't recognize her own hypocrisy. Her view of life was summed up, for me, in her belief that her family was entitled to first refusal on a plot of land owned by someone else, destined to be sold to someone else, simply because her family enjoyed looking at it. This was my first Faith Fairchild mystery: I don't plan to bother with another.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. Griffin VINE VOICE on May 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the thirteenth novel in the Faith Fairchild series, and Katherine Hall Page continues to provide a fine reading experience. Unlike some other long running series, Page's writing continues to be clear, consistent, and the story lines and characters remain congruent.
The Body in the Lighthouse finds Faith and her family at the summer vacation home in Maine. While waiting for renovations on the home to be completed, the Fairchild family moves in temporarily with the mother of Faith's best friend Pix. This creates the setting for Faith to gain understanding of and empathy with the long-term residents of the town and their slow loss of their property and livelihoods to summer residents and newcomers building "MacMansions."
The unrest in the town is also portrayed through a quarrel between families over lobster traps, a local play that puts a spotlight on the unknown talents of some residents, and a Romeo & Juliet type love story. As in the other stories in the series, Faith's family life runs in parallel to these activities and the crimes in the town.
Well written and contemporary without relying on undue violence or profanity, The Body in the Lighthouse is an enjoyable read. Although the final conclusion will not be a surprise to most readers, it is satisfyingly consistent with the story line and human nature.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. A Michaud on July 24, 2003
Format: Hardcover
There are only two reasons to stick with this slow-moving story to its end: (1)you enjoy reading page after page of household and shopping trivia about upper middle class families who can afford vacation homes, or (2) you're curious to see if any real action ever takes place. There is no tension in the first half of the book; no suspense, no real mystery. The action is concentrated at the end. The author employs a tactic used too often in female-centered mysteries; the murderer behaves like a gentleman the first time the protagonist gets too nosy, bopping her on the head but then delivering her unconscious body to her home. That behavior truly requires suspension of disbelief. Male readers in particular are likely to find the story terminally boring.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By booksforabuck VINE VOICE on October 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Faith Fairchild arrives in Sampere Island, Maine only to find that the summer house is incomplete, that a Romeo and Juliet scenerio is being carried out in the town even as villagers rehearse the play, and that eco-terrorists are battling developers for the future of this once pristine, but now highly priced town. Faith involves herself with the play and suffers mixed feelings about the eco-terrorists. While she agrees that huge mansions mar the beauty of the island and also cut off beaches from the ordinary citizens, surely fires and destruction are not the way to achieve them. When she stumbles across a body near the abandoned lighthouse, though, things start looking serious. Although the death is certainly accidental--isn't it?
Author Katherine Hall Page immerses the reader in the details of Faith's life--her cooking, caring for her two children, and her joy in discovering paint chips at Home Depot. The story moves forward at an unhurried pace, as Faith uses her connections to the Island's grapevine to discover the secrets so many Islanders hide.
THE BODY IN THE LIGHTHOUSE is a short quick read. It didn't grip me, and I found Faith to be not especially interesting as a character, but Page's writing is solid and her insights into a changing era on an island transitioning from fishing to resort.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on June 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Tom and Faith Fairchild accompanied by their two children leave their Massachusetts home to spend the summer renovating their cottage on Sanpere Island, Maine. To their surprise the usually serene residents are livid as mansion building is in vogue with the invasion of wealthy individuals having houses built as toys for their use.
Some Sanpere islanders are a bit more active in their resentment, mostly with protests. When the tide ebbs the corpse of developer Harold Hapswell is found jammed between two ledges at the base of the lighthouse. Faith thinks Hapswell was murdered, which is confirmed when someone attacks her near the lighthouse. As the island simmers in anger, summer events continue. Faith unable to ignore the homicide following the attempted assault on her and begins her own brand of investigation.
THE BODY IN THE LIGHTHOUSE is a fun summer breeze cozy that is an ideal beach book. The story line moves in a contrasting way between the murder and the festivities. Though Faith should know better than to risk her life as she does, she remains a fresh amateur sleuth (after thirteen novels, amateur seems wrong, but then again the professional gets paid) willing to do what she thinks is right. This is simply a lighthearted breezy mystery.
Harriet Klausner
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