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The Book of Abramelin: A New Translation Hardcover – September 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Nicolas Hays, Inc; 1st American Hardcover Ed edition (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 089254127X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0892541270
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #132,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Abraham von Worms, long thought to be a pseudonymous figure, is nearly conclusively proved to be a well-known 14th century Jewish scholar, Rabbi Jacob ben Moses ha Levi Moellin, more commonly known as MaHaRIL. Georg Dehn is a life-long student of all things esoteric, which led him on the quest to not only translate The Book of Abramelin, but also to following the original seeker's footsteps through the Middle East and eventually to the hermitage at Araki. He is the founder and publisher of Edition Araki, a German publishing company specializing in the occult. Dehn is the author of many works, Abramelin being the first to be translated into English. He lives in Leipzig, Germany.

Lon Milo DuQuette has been involved with occult studies since the late 60s and has become an acknowledged and widely-recognized authority within the world of modern occultism. He is the U.S. Deputy Grand Master of the O.T.O. and lives with his wife Constance in Costa Mesa, CA

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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For me the most fascinating part was when the author describes others he has known that practiced magic.
Richard Deveno
I should say here that if you are well acquainted with the basics concepts of quabbalah and the book of abramelin you will see here that what i say is true.
dakota fisher
Instead of 242, mostly incomplete squares, the German manuscripts show 251 squares, and every single one of them is completely filled in.
M. Stone

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

110 of 115 people found the following review helpful By M. Stone VINE VOICE on January 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First let me say that I have, as many students have done, poured over the Mathers edition of "Sacred Magic" and for the better part of my life, took for granted that I was well versed in the Art of Abramelin, planning only to wait until my kids were grown to see it through to completion. It was well I waited, as the translation of the original German texts show where the French version Mathers worked with, was lacking in more than a few places.

The underpinnings remain the same. The ultimate goal of Abramelin's Art is to gain direct conversation with your Holy Guardian Angel. There is also the book Abraham writes to his son, as an explanation of how the Treasure and the Art came into his hands. Anyone familiar with the Mathers version will also recognize the last book. It consists of magical squares that produce sundry effects by way of the spirits that are bound to them.

If it sounds like too much is the same to bother purchasing this book, let me counter by listing the things that are different.

* There is a fourth book, in addition to the three Mathers translated from the French edition. This book deals with what Abraham calls the "mixed kabbalah". It is in effect a formulary of folk cures, charms, and nostrums that are not to be found at all in the Mathers edition.

* Instead of six months, the operation detailed here, is a much more complex 18 months.

* The squares from the final book that mesmerize so many students are completely different in the original German, than they are in the manuscript Mathers had worked from. Instead of 242, mostly incomplete squares, the German manuscripts show 251 squares, and every single one of them is completely filled in.
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49 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Zadzaczadlin on May 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The book of Abramelin is a highly important and original book of magic, which describes a process for getting in touch with one's Holy Guardian angel. It was rediscovered and published for the first time by Macgregor Mathers, a co-founder of the Golden Dawn. It obsessed Aleister Crowley, who was unable to carry through the ritual it describes. Mathers only had a French exemplar of the text. More reliable German versions were discovered and published by Dehn in 1995/2001, in German. This is the English translation of that work.
Dehn has based his text on several manuscripts which were unknown to Mathers. But this is not a critical text, as no manuscript readings are reported by Dehn, and we do not know how he weighed the different readings, or how he decided which reading was correct.
A completely new feature of the present edition is the inclusion of "Book Two", a collection of medieval magical recipes. The original manuscripts contain a total of 160 recipes, but Dehn only includes 36 representative examples in this edition.
"Book Four" contains the famous magical squares. It is here that Dehn's textual methods are most obscure and disappointing, as many of the problems posed by the squares remain unresolved. As an example, the first word of square 1\8 should read "EKDILUN", and we can arrive at this corrected reading quite easily by approaching the squares as though they were Sudoku puzzles. But Dehn does not correct any of the squares in this way, and he remains silent as to which manuscript his chosen reading came from. Many other squares can be resolved logically by the Sudoku method.
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Mark Stavish, The Institute for Hermetic Studies on December 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
"The Book of Abramelin - A New Translation" by Dehn and Guth may very well be the finest contribution to modern esotericism in a generation.

Those familiar with the Mathers translation will find stunning new material in this edition, as well as practical advice not present in the French manuscript used by Mathers. In addition to corrections, stating that the Operation used to achieve "Knowledge and Conversation" with one's Holy Guardian Angel, takes place over an 18th month period and not 6 as previously believed, there is an entire chapter on magical operations that students of German folk magic or "brauche" (aka Pow-wow) will find of interest in that they have found their way into the now famous "Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses" once popular among the Pennsylvania Germans and their magical arts. The author clearly defines that distinctions between calssical kabbalah, 'mixed-kabbalah,' and the 'Sacred Magic' as he is presenting it.

All of the magical squares are filled in, unlike the Mathers edition, wherein only parts of the squares were known, and extensive biographical information on the author of "The Book of Abramelin," and the travels of its current translators rounds out the book making it not only a highly practical manual of self-initiation, but also contemporary and living, instead of a historical curiosity.

The similarities between the author's period (15th Century) and our own in many respects also has a strange appeal in bridging the centuries and making "The Book of Abramelin" very appropriate, albeit needed, for our times. Oddly, students of the Golden Dawn will walk away with an even greater respect for Mathers work as they will have a better understanding of the tremendous contribution he made and the limited resources he worked with.
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