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The Book On Bookies: An Inside Look At A Successful Sports Gambling Operation Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1581600704 ISBN-10: 1581600704 Edition: 1St Edition

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The Book On Bookies: An Inside Look At A Successful Sports Gambling Operation + The Smart Money: How the World's Best Sports Bettors Beat the Bookies Out of Millions + The Odds: One Season, Three Gamblers, and the Death of Their Las Vegas
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Paladin Press; 1St Edition edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581600704
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581600704
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #608,697 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Fun reading too!
Don Shimasaki
In summary I really cannot recommend this book to gamblers and especially not to anyone thinking of becoming a bookmaker!
obediah
For me it was a waste of money and time really, but if ure new to gambling it might help u.
Gator

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By obediah on January 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Book on Bookies" is a manual on how to run a sports book in America. It must be noted that such an enterprise is illegal and carries various risk. The book constantly mentions large tax free income which adds tax evasion to your list of criminal activities.
My biggest gripe with the book is its deviation from factual and useful content. The "basics" chapter is riddled with glaring deficiencies - here are a few that I noted
(a) Book: there are no winning gamblers - truth: there are few winning gamblers, but the few winners can really hurt the bottom line
(b) Book: you cannot specify pitchers in baseball - truth: the standard way to book baseball is to offer listed pitchers
(c) Book: Dime line baseball is booked at -110 a side - truth: dime line baseball is booked at -105 a side
(d) Book: Soccer is booked without totals - truth: soccer is booked with totals, 2.5 being the most common number
(e) Book: Nascar is an easy money spinner - truth: Nascar is a sport where the lines are weak and the "wiseguys" can eat you alive
(f) Book: The "field" bet never wins in golf - truth: "No name" golfers are beginning to proliferate the winner's list at PGA and European golf tournaments
Aside from the factual inaccuracies, the book simply doesn't mention many of the important developments that have taken place in the bookmaking world. Important terms such as "beard", "middle" and "steam" are only mentioned in the glossary. Each term quite possibly deserves a chapter of its own. Finally, there is no mention of the ubiquitous "Don Best" screen, which governs the betting line from Vegas to the Caribbean. The way the author describes grading the wagers manually is almost comical.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By BDV on November 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
"The Book on Bookies" was very insightful for those curious about the gambling world and those who want to start their own outfit. It was written as a "How To" book on starting one's own operation detailing the types of action taken, how to not get caught, how to collect, and how to be very successful. There were a few points missing, namely how to deal with smart gamblers (something the author adamantly believes do not exist), and how the offshore and internet casinos have affected the bookie business. There is such as thing as a smart gambler, one who uses legitimate handicapping services, unloads a ton of action on one game every few weeks, bets the same dollar amount each time no matter what, and clears his account once the season is over. I could personally guarantee that I would have ALWAYS taken his money at the end of football season. The question remains: what should be done with a gambler who has control of his wagers and sees sports gambling as a way to consistently turn a profit at the end of a season? Should the bookie not take his action and direct him elsewhere? The author left this point out because he believes the winning gambler does not exist, but I assure him that they do even though they consist of less than 5% of the gambling population. Another question I had was "Should a bookie place a bet with another operation if he has too much action on one side of a game?" Reason dictates that if the same amount is wagered with someone else (preferably with a legit offshore casino) then no matter the outcome, the bookie will turn a profit from the juice. All in all, a good read (didn't much care for the jab at Philadelphia, but every Philadelphian would stick up for their city no matter what), and recommended to those interested in this underworld. I would like to speak with the author if he was available, but no information was given about his whereabouts (go figure).
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kelvin L. Cheung on February 7, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had fairly high hopes for this book after reading the online reviews. What a letdown. Don't expect to learn anything that will help you gamble. The most interesting part of bookmaking--making and moving lines--is glossed over (author mentions software to retrieve lines from online sources). Instead, the book is full of inane details such as which color pen to write with while taking bets.
If you are looking for a condescending read describing how to run an illegal business which will continue to become less and less profitable as online casinos flourish, this is the book for you. If you're looking for a book to teach you about sports betting, I would recommend Stanford Wong's "Sharp Sports Betting".
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Konrad Baumeister VINE VOICE on December 9, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first thing to make clear about this book is that it is meant to cover sports betting from the bookie's side, not the players, and is therefore very definitely NOT about how to make money betting sports. I have no idea what book the reviewers talking about how this made them better gamblers are talking about, unless they mean to say that they quit playing after reading it (a very reasonable course of action).

The second thing is that there are a few technical details on the lines that are inaccurate or out of date. Further, the idea of manually grading 150-200 customers, many of them playing multiple games and non-straight bets, is a joke in the year 2006. Doing this yourself is nuts, giving it to a clerk (who the author assumes will rob him blind given the chance) doesn't seem like an ideal option either.

Finally, the author in trying to come off clever or hip or wise or whatever his attitude is supposed to convey comes off instead as a 24-carat butt hole, with his utter and complete contempt for gamblers (his customers). Despite all admonitions to keep it professional and courteous in treatment of those making him money, his disgust and condescension drips off page after page, eventually becoming quite annoying.

If you are a gambler, the only point in reading this book is as a form of intervention. If you are a bookie, you learn little or nothing. If you are neither, it is an unusual glimpse into the mind of ONE bookie, anyhow. Not many books cover this subject from this angle.
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