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32 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Literary Enigma. Life Changing. A Personal God Revealed.
The Book of Mormon has changed my life. Whether you are Christian or not, we all need redemption and this book talks about redemption. This book portrays a God who is loving, caring, protecting and who loves His children SO much that He weeps over them. This is the God I believe in. It teaches about miracles, prayer, love, charity, the power of the Holy Ghost, correct...
Published 25 days ago by Andrew Proctor

versus
306 of 373 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars analytical and bemused
As a sociologist and member of the American Academy of Religion, I find most of the reviews of the Book of Mormon not be helpful, on the one hand, and kind of curious, on the other hand. Clearly, most are from partisans (either strongly for or against) and not about the text itself or as holy writ of a significant world religion to be accorded the kind of respect one...
Published on December 13, 2004 by "Lament"


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306 of 373 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars analytical and bemused, December 13, 2004
As a sociologist and member of the American Academy of Religion, I find most of the reviews of the Book of Mormon not be helpful, on the one hand, and kind of curious, on the other hand. Clearly, most are from partisans (either strongly for or against) and not about the text itself or as holy writ of a significant world religion to be accorded the kind of respect one would for sacred writings of other religions.

I am among those who (many years ago) received a free copy and read it, both as religious text and as literature. It is not the kind of reading one takes lightly or for fun (altho' apparently some read it for ridicule). But then, neither does one do so for the Bible or Upanshids or Koran, etc. As religious text I found it very interesting and worthy of study, as suggested by some major religious studies scholars, e.g., the eminent Jewish scholar Jacob Neusner and a prominent professor at Harvard Divinity (whose name escapes me for the moment). I found reading the Book of Mormon to be much more akin to the Bible than to such things as Calvin's "Institutes" and other systematic theologizing.

It is something one should read for oneself rather than decide on the basis of critics or supporters. It has many beautiful poetic passages and inspiring moral sermons, like some of the best sermons I have heard delivered by a few Protestant preachers.

Is it historically accurate? Is the Bible? Who knows? But the jury is still out on both of those. However, one should not read it as a history text but as a human story, as something that portrays principles about the human condition and human society as people pursue various values and beliefs.

What I do wish is that the publishers would provide a little more background for understanding its origin and its place in an expanding world religion and as part of global diversity of belief systems, not just the text itself.

Finally, I'm not sure why I would buy this particular edition rather than get another free copy from the Mormon Church.

"Lament"

Ithaca, NY
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A slow read, December 3, 2014
The story in the Book of Mormon is semi-engaging, but bogged down in King James-esque language, and a fairly blatant ripoff of another fictional, contemporary book entitled The Late War, which the author, Joseph Smith Jr. obviously had read. Please take a look at this side-by-side comparison of the text of both books: http://wordtreefoundation.github.io/thelatewar/ . I don't admire those who plagiarize.

Joseph Smith claimed to have received visits from angels and deity, to have found golden plates (ancient records) buried for thousands of years, and to have translated the records on those plates into the text of the Book of Mormon. However, there is evidence to indicate he and his family were involved in folk-magic beliefs including the idea that chests of buried treasure moved magically through the hills of New York state, and could be found by looking through/at special stones (rocks) by one who had that gift. Joseph claimed to have this gift and hired himself out to those eager to find this buried treasure. Legal records at the time show Joseph Smith was convicted of being a "glass looker" and fined for the offense, when those who hired him reported him as a fraud.

LDS-approved artist renditions of the translation process show Joseph reading ancient characters from a stack of thin metal pages; however, written journal records of those involved, including his first wife, Emma, indicate that Joseph Smith did most of the "translating" by putting one of his stones in his hat and then putting his face into the hat, claiming to read the words aloud as they appeared in the hat, while someone else wrote them down. No one but Joseph Smith ever saw these golden plates, and according to the story, an angel took them back to heaven.

Approached as literal fact (as faithful Mormons do), it's badly flawed. At the time The Book of Mormon was published, many of its "historical" claims could not be disproved, but as scientific knowledge has grown, Mormons must question the literal validity of the book or else willfully ignore clear facts. For example, the book's claim that Native Americans are of direct Jewish descent is destroyed by DNA evidence showing no Semitic markers in Native Americans. Instead, Asian DNA markers are present, supporting ancient migration of Asian populations into the Americas. Furthermore, there is no archeological evidence of the cities and battles and culture described in the Book of Mormon. Not a single weapon or chariot, no ruins of cities, no mounds of human bones that should be easily found based on the huge battles described in the book. Other problems include description of horses, steel, and grains that did not exist in the Americas in that timeframe; translation errors that existed in the version of the Bible that Joseph Smith had also appearing as "newly translated" text in the Book of Mormon, etc.

The Book of Mormon is a work of fiction, a slow read, perhaps interesting as a study in creative plagiarism or as an example of a psychological study of the author. As a holy book or scripture or inspired text, however, it is wholly uninteresting.
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49 of 59 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Mark Twain had a few words about the Book of Mormon., December 1, 2014
Mark Twain's Review of the Book of Mormon
From chapter 16 of Roughing It. Transcribed by Joey Day.
§

All men have heard of the Mormon Bible, but few except the “elect” have seen it, or, at least, taken the trouble to read it. I brought away a copy from Salt Lake. The book is a curiosity to me, it is such a pretentious affair, and yet so “slow,” so sleepy; such an insipid mess of inspiration. It is chloroform in print. If Joseph Smith composed this book, the act was a miracle—keeping awake while he did it was, at any rate. If he, accourding to tradition, merely translated it from certain ancient and mysteriously-engraved plates of copper, which he declares he found under a stone, in an out-of-the-way locality, the work of translating was equally a miracle, for the same reason.

The book seems to be merely a prosy detail of imaginary history, with the Old Testament for a model; followed by a tedious plagiarism of the New Testament. The author labored to give his words and phrases the quaint, old-fashioned sound and structure of our King James’s translation of the Scriptures; and the result is a mongrel—half modern glibness, and half ancient simplicity and gravity. The latter is awkward and constrained; the former natural, but grotesque by the contrast. Whenever he found his speech growing too modern—which was about every sentence or two—he ladled in a few such Scriptural phrases as “exceeding sore,” “and it came to pass,” etc., and made things satisfactory again. “And it came to pass” was his pet. If he had left that out, his Bible would have been only a pamphlet.

The title-page reads as follows:
THE BOOK OF MORMON: AN ACCOUNT WRITTEN BY THE HAND OF MORMON, UPON PLATES TAKEN FROM THE PLATES OF NEPHI.

Wherefore it is an abridgment of the record of the people of Nephi, and also of the Lamanites; written to the Lamanites, who are a remnant of the house of Israel; and also to Jew and Gentile; written by way of commandment, and also by the spirit of prophecy and of revelation. Written and sealed up, and hid up unto the Lord, that they might not be destroyed; to come forth by the gift and power of God unto the interpretation thereof; sealed by the hand of Moroni, and hid up unto the Lord, to come forth in due time by way of the Gentile; the interpretation thereof by the gift of God. An abridgment taken from the Book of Ether also; which is a record of the people of Jared; who were scattered at the time the Lord confounded the language of the people when they were building a tower to get to Heaven.
“Hid up” is good. And so is “wherefore”—though why “wherefore”? Any other word would have answered as well—though in truth it would not have sounded so Scriptural.

Next comes:
THE TESTIMONY OF THREE WITNESSES.

Be it known unto all nations, kindreds, tongues, and people unto whom this work shall come, that we, through the grace of God the Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, have seen the plates which contain this record, which is a record of the people of Nephi, and also of the Lamanites, their brethren, and also of the people of Jared, who came from the tower of which hath been spoken; and we also know that they have been translated by the gift and power of God, for His voice hath declared it unto us; wherefore we know of a surety that the work is true. And we also testify that we have seen the engravings which are upon the plates; and they have been shown unto us by the power of God, and not of man. And we declare with words of soberness, that an angel of God came down from heaven, and he brought and laid before our eyes, that we beheld and saw the plates, and the engravings thereon; and we know that it is by the grace of God the Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, that we beheld and bear record that these things are true; and it is marvelous in our eyes; nevertheless the voice of the Lord commanded us that we should bear record of it; wherefore, to be obedient unto the commandments of God, we bear testimony of these things. And we know that if we are faithful in Christ, we shall rid our garments of the blood of all men, and be found spotless before the judgment-seat of Christ, and shall dwell with Him eternally in the heavens. And the honor be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost, which is one God. Amen.

OLIVER COWDERY,
DAVID WHITMER,
MARTIN HARRIS.
Some people have to have a world of evidence before they can come anywhere in the neighborhood of believing anything; but for me, when a man tells me that he has “seen the engravings which are upon the plates,” and not only that, but an angel was there at the time, and saw him see them, and probably took his receipt for it, I am very far on the road to conviction, no matter whether I ever heard of that man before or not, and even if I do not know the name of the angel, or his nationality either.

Next is this:
AND ALSO THE TESTIMONY OF EIGHT WITNESSES.

Be it known unto all nations, kindreds, tongues, and people unto whom this work shall come, that Joseph Smith, Jr., the translator of this work, has shown unto us the plates of which hath been spoken, which have the appearance of gold; and as many of the leaves as the said Smith has translated, we did handle with our hands; and we also saw the engravings thereon, all of which has the appearance of ancient work, and of curious workmanship. And this we bear record with words of soberness, that the said Smith has shown unto us, for we have seen and hefted, and know of a surety that the said Smith has got the plates of which we have spoken. And we give our names unto the world, to witness unto the world that which we have seen; and we lie not, God bearing witness of it.

CHRISTIAN WHITMER,
JACOB WHITMER,
PETER WHITMER, JR.,
JOHN WHITMER,
HIRAM PAGE,
JOSEPH SMITH, SR.,
HYRUM SMITH,
SAMUEL H. SMITH.
And when I am far on the road to conviction, and eight men, be they grammatical or otherwise, come forward and tell me that they have seen the plates too; and not only seen those plates but “hefted” them, I am convinced. I could not feel more satisfied and at rest if the entire Whitmer family had testified.

The Mormon Bible consists of fifteen “books”—being the books of Jacob, Enos, Jarom, Omni, Mosiah, Zeniff, Alma, Helaman, Ether, Moroni, two “books” of Mormon, and three of Nephi.

In the first book of Nephi is a plagiarism of the Old Testament, which gives an account of the exodus from Jerusalem of the “children of Lehi”; and it goes on to tell of their wanderings in the wilderness, during eight years, and their supernatural protection by one of their number, a party by the name of Nephi. They finally reached the land of “Bountiful,” and camped by the sea. After they had remained there “for the space of many days”—which is more Scriptural than definite—Nephi was commanded from on high to build a ship wherein to “carry the people across the waters.” He travestied Noah’s ark—but he obeyed orders in the matter of the plan. He finished the ship in a single day, while his brethren stood by and made fun of it—and of him, too—“saying, our brother is a fool, for he thinketh that he can build a ship” They did not wait for the timbers to dry, but the whole tribe or nation sailed the next day. Then a bit of genuine nature cropped out, and is revealed by outspoken Nephi with Scriptural frankness—they all got on a spree! They, “and also their wives, began to make themselves merry, insomuch that they began to dance, and to sing, and to speak with much rudeness; yea, they were lifted up unto exceeding rudeness.”

Nephi tried to stop these scandalous proceedings; but they tied him neck and heels, and went on with their lark. But observe how Nephi the prophet circumvented them by the aid of the invisible powers:
And it came to pass that after they had bound me, insomuch that I could not move, the compass, which had been prepared of the Lord, did cease to work; wherefore, they knew not whither they should steer the ship, insomuch that there arose a great storm, yea, a great and terrible tempest, and we were driven back upon the waters for the space of three days; and they began to be frightened exceedingly, lest they should be drowned in the sea; nevertheless they did not loose me. And on the fourth day, which we had been driven back, the tempest began to be exceeding sore. And it came to pass that we were about to be swallowed up in the depths of the sea.
Then they untied him.
And it came to pass after they had loosed me, behold, I took the compass, and it did work whither I desired it. And it came to pass that I prayed unto the Lord; and after I had prayed, the winds did cease, and the storm did cease, and there was a great calm.
Equipped with their compass, these ancients appear to have had the advantage of Noah.

Their voyage was toward a “promised land”—the only name they give it. They reached it in safety.

Polygamy is a recent feature in the Mormon religion, and was added by Brigham Young after Joseph Smith’s death. Before that, it was regarded as an “abomination.” This verse from the Mormon Bible occurs in Chapter II. of the book of Jacob:
For behold, thus saith the Lord, this people begin to wax in iniquity; they understand not the Scriptures; for they seek to excuse themselves in committing whoredoms, because of the things which were written concerning David, and Solomon his son. Behold, David and Solomon truly had many wives and concubines, which thing was abominable before me, saith the Lord; wherefore, thus saith the Lord, I have led this people forth out of the land of Jerusalem, by the power of mine arm, that I might raise up unto me a righteous branch from the fruit of the loins of Joseph. Wherefore, I the Lord God, will not suffer that this people shall do like unto them of old.
However, the project failed—or at least the modern Mormon end of it—for Brigham “suffers” it. This verse is from the same chapter:
Behold, the Lamanites your brethren, whom ye hate, because of their filthiness and the cursings which hath come upon their skins, are more righteous than you; for they have not forgotten the commandment of the Lord, which was given unto our fathers, that they should have, save it were one wife; and concubines they should have none.
The following verse (from Chapter IX. of the Book of Nephi) appears to contain information not familiar to everybody:
And now it came to pass that when Jesus had ascended into heaven, the multitude did disperse, and every man did take his wife and his children, and did return to his own home.

And it came to pass that on the morrow, when the multitude was gathered together, behold, Nephi and his brother whom he had raised from the dead, whose name was Timothy, and also his son, whose name was Jonas, and also Mathoni, and Mathonihah, his brother, and Kumen, and Kumenenhi, and Jeremiah, and Shemnon, and Jonas, and Zedekiah, and Isaiah; now these were the names of the disciples whom Jesus had chosen.
In order that the reader may observe how much more grandeur and picturesqueness (as seen by these Mormon twelve) accompanied on of the tenderest episodes in the life of our Saviour than other eyes seem to have been aware of, I quote the following from the same “book”—Nephi:
And it came to pass that Jesus spake unto them, and bade them arise. And they arose from the earth, and He said unto them, Blessed are ye because of your faith. And now behold, My joy is full. And when He had said these words, He wept, and the multitude bear record of it, and He took their little children, one by one, and blessed them, and prayed unto the Father for them. And when He had done this He wept again, and He spake unto the multitude, and saith unto them, Behold your little ones. And as they looked to behold, they cast their eyes toward heaven, and they saw the heavens open, and they saw angels descending out of heaven as it were, in the midst of fire; and they came down and encircled those little ones about, and they were encircled about with fire; and the angels did minister unto them, and the multitude did see and hear and bear record; and they know that their record is true, for they all of them did see and hear, every man for himself; and they were in number about two thousand and five hundred souls; and they did consist of men, women, and children.
And what else would they be likely to consist of?

The Book of Ether is an incomprehensible medley of if “history,” much of it relating to battles and sieges among peoples whom the reader has possibly never heard of; and who inhabited a country which is not set down in the geography. There was a King with the remarkable name of Coriantumr, and he warred with Shared, and Lib, and Shiz, and others, in the “plains of Heshlon”; and the “valley of Gilgal”; and the “wilderness of Akish”; and the “land of Moran”; and the “plains of Agosh”; and “Ogath,” and “Ramah,” and the “land of Corihor,” and the “hill Comnor,” by “the waters of Ripliancum,” etc., etc., etc. “And it came to pass,” after a deal of fighting, that Coriantumr, upon making calculation of his losses, found that “there had been slain two millions of mighty men, and also their wives and their children”—say 5,000,000 or 6,000,000 in all—“and he began to sorrow in his heart.” Unquestionably it was time. So he wrote to Shiz, asking a cessation of hostilities, and offering to give up his kingdom to save his people. Shiz declined, except upon condition that Coriantumr would come and let him cut his head off first—a thing which Coriantumr would not do. Then there was more fighting for a season; then four years were devoted to gathering the forces for a final struggle—after which ensued a battle, which, I take it, is the most remarkable set forth in history,—except, perhaps, that of the Kilkenny cats, which it resembles in some respects. This is the account of the gathering and the battle:
And it came to pass that they did gather together all the people, upon all the face of the land, who had not been slain, save it was Ether. And it came to pass that Ether did behold all the doings of the people; and he beheld that the people who were for Coriantumr, were gathered together to the army of Coriantumr; and the people who were for Shiz, were gathered together to the army of Shiz; wherefore they were for the space of four years gathering together the people, that they might get all who were upon the face of the land, and that they might receive all the strength which it was possible that they could receive. And it came to pass that when they were all gathered together, every one to the army which he would, with their wives and their children; both men, women, and children being armed with weapons of war, having shields, and breast-plates, and head-plates, and being clothed after the manner of war, they did march forth one against another, to battle; and they fought all that day, and conquered not. And it came to pass that when it was night they were weary, and retired to their camps; and after they had retired to their camps, they took up a howling and a lamentation for the loss of the slain of their people; and so great were their cries, their howlings and lamentations, that it did rend the air exceedingly. And it came to pass that on the morrow they did go again to battle, and great and terrible was that day; nevertheless they conquered not, and when the night came again, they did rend the air with their cries, and their howlings, and their mournings, for the loss of the slain of their people.

And it came to pass that Coriantumr wrote again an epistle unto Shiz, desiring that he would not come again to battle, but that he would take the kingdom, and spare the lives of the people. But behold, the Spirit of the Lord had ceased striving with them, and Satan had full power over the hearts of the people, for they were given up unto the hardness of their hearts, and the blindness of their minds that they might be destroyed; wherefore they went again to battle. And it came to pass that they fought all that day, and when the night came they slept upon their swords; and on the morrow they fought even until the night came; and when the night came they were drunken with anger, even as a man who is drunken with wine; and they slept again upon their swords; and on the morrow they fought again; and when the night came they had all fallen by the sword save it were fifty and two of the people of Coriantumr, and sixty and nine of the people of Shiz. And it came to pass that they slept upon their swords that night, and on the morrow they fought again, and they contended in their mights with their swords, and with their shields, all that day; and when the night came there were thirty and two of the people of Shiz, and twenty and seven of the people of Coriantumr.

And it came to pass that they ate and slept, and prepared for death on the morrow. And they were large and mighty men, as to the strength of men. And it came to pass that they fought for the space of three hours, and they fainted with the loss of blood. And it came to pass that when the men of Coriantumr had received sufficient strength, that they could walk, they were about to flee for their lives, but behold, Shiz arose, and also his men, and he swore in his wrath that he would slay Coriantumr, or he would perish by the sword: wherefore he did pursue them, and on the morrow he did overtake them; and they fought again with the sword. And it came to pass that when they had all fallen by the sword, save it were Coriantumr and Shiz, behold Shiz had fainted with loss of blood. And it came to pass that when Coriantumr had leaned upon his sword, that he rested a little, he smote off the head of Shiz. And it came to pass that after he had smote off the head of Shiz, that Shiz raised upon his hands and fell; and after that he had struggled for breath, he died. And it came to pass that Coriantumr fell to the earth, and became as if he had no life. And the Lord spake unto Ether, and said unto him, go forth. And he went forth, and beheld that the words of the Lord had all been fulfilled; and he finished his record; and the hundredth part I have not written.
It seems a pity he did not finish, for after all his dreary former chapters of commonplace, he stopped just as he was in danger of becoming interesting.

The Mormon Bible is rather stupid and tiresome to read, but there is nothing vicious in its teachings. Its code of morals is unobjectionable—it is “smouched” from the New Testament and no credit given.
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36 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars run away!, December 1, 2014
This is quite possibly one if the worst works of fiction ever written. Don't waste your money on the illusions of a charlatan.
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60 of 73 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ... to throw in a bunch of Bible verses for good messure,, December 1, 2014
This Book was Written By Joseph Smith with lots and lots of "And It came to pass" He Made sure to throw in a bunch of Bible verses for good messure,.. Mormon did not write this book as there was no Mormom No Alma No Moroni ...Moroni is the capitol ( A Arabic name) of the Comoros Islands, But Smith in his wildest imagination would have never guessed people would find out things like that is the future ,In the book the "Lamenites" or Dark Skinned "Indians" were evil ..the Nephites were white and good !!.
There is ZERO evidence of these people No bones of thousands of killed soldiers No Swords No Evidence of their cities ETC.
The Mormon Church wants to separate you from critical thinking self guidance and especially your hard earned money !
Please ask the Mormons to tell you how Joseph Smith "translated" The BOM ,,They will tell you He used magic glasses .Joseph Smiths friends said He put a "Magic Rock " In a hat and looked into it ,,Well if you believe stuff like that this book is for you !
Where are the gold plates the Book of Mormon came from supposedly? Well no one ever saw them and well Joe Smith said that a Angel took them away ...How convenient right ?? :) Stay away from this scam Cult that is my advice
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52 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Plot is interesting but should only be held as a 19th century fantasy and not a historical account of actual events, December 1, 2014
Once you get past the constant repetition of words and phrases and over use of King James style English, you find a story of a Jewish family that flees Jerusalem shortly before its destruction in 587 BCE. They somehow are able to construct vessels that are capable of trans-Atlantic (or perhaps pacific) travel. Stuff happens and two large civilizations emerge somehow from only 20 or so people. These civilizations are at constant war and ultimately one completely destroys the other around 400 CE. There is also a very similar story wedged into the book about another family that fled the middle east shortly after the tower of babel but they too destroyed each other in an epic war that ended in only a single survivor.

It sounds like a pretty interesting read until you actually sit down and start it. It becomes boring fast and even Mark Twain called it "chloroform in print." The book contains many anachronisms (too many to mention here but you should google it if you are interested) that you would expect to find if the book was written in 1830 by a man who knew very little of the Americas. Even though the book tells of civilizations that would have had populations in the millions and battles where hundreds of thousands of people died, not a single piece of evidence has been found to corroborate the story contained in the book.

Many people hold this book as a spiritual book with a spiritual message and although we can have a discussion on those merits (like why God would think it was okay to murder a passed out man in the street), the book should be held as nothing more. It is fine if you find some deeper meaning to the book, but all the evidence points to it being a modern story of fictional events.
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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Book of Mormon is nothing more than a fictional ..., December 1, 2014
The Book of Mormon is nothing more than a fictional account made up by Joseph Smith. In some cases, entire passages were simply copied verbatim from the King James Bible.
Also, if you are looking to learn about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints (Mormons), reading the Book of Mormon will give you virtually no insight into the current organization or structure of the LDS church headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah.
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60 of 73 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you like historical fiction, you still won't like this book., December 1, 2014
To detail all the inaccuracies of the Book of Mormon by its troubled founder Joseph Smith would require far more space than what I'm limited to here.

Simplest way to learn the facts is to Google "Book of Mormon problems" and click on the mormonthink link that comes back in the results.

To whet your appetite, not a single Book of Mormon archaeological site has been found, modern DNA analysis disproves the origin of the fictional people that are written about in the Book of Mormon, and while not directly related to the content of the book, Joseph Smith (the book's purported translator) made up the contents using a magic rock in a hat.

Happy reading if you enjoy bad historical fiction.

I say these things, in the name of Jesus Christ, amen.
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63 of 77 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Funny, huh, December 1, 2014
I would give zero stars if I could. This book is plagiarized from many others that Joseph Smith had access to in his day ("The Late War" and "view of the Hebrews", just to name a few). Additionally, the book of Isaiah in the Book of Mormon is a word for word copy of whole books in the bible....written exactly as it is in the King James version. Funny, huh, given that this book was supposedly translated from gold plates which were inscribed many centuries before the King James Version of the bible was written. And, folks, that's just for starters. This "most correct book" of all books on the planet has had 10,000 changes to it since JS first wrote it, of which 4000 are more than just punctuation or grammatical changes. Additionally, the Mormon missionaries (and teachers and lesson manuals, for those of us raised in Mormonism) teach that Joseph Smith translated the plates through the "gift and power of god", and using the "Urim and thummim". Except that he didn't. And now, in addition to lots of fancy footwork the church is having to do to explain the real (and seedy) origins of their church, they're having to admit that Joseph "translated" these supposed two hundred pound plates (which he hauled around under his arm...) by sticking his magic rock in a hat and putting his face down into the hat to read the translated words inscribed there on. Right. So, if you read the book as a curiosity, dredged up from the mind of a sexually charged, convicted fraudster and charlatan, I guess you may enjoy it. Me, not so much...I know the damage this religion does to real lives and souls.
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85 of 105 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I guess that is what comes from 6 AM family scripture study., December 1, 2014
Anachronisms and racism abound in a book that in all reality has very little to do with the current LDS church. The text reads much more like Methodist fan fiction then another testament it claims to be. The sixteenth century English sticks out like a sore thumb and there are more "And it came to pass" then the actual King James version. The central thesis of the book contends to be to convince the gentiles that Jesus is the Christ. I find this to be somewhat humorous because where Jesus makes his entrance he delivers absolutely nothing new that we couldn't have gotten from the text of the New Testament. In fact those chapters are lifted in large part word from word including the 1611 KJV mistakes that would have been eliminated if Joseph was translating the book from an actual historical record. There is nothing new in the book.

The only question the book tends to answer is the major theological contentions surrounding the second great awakening. Infant baptism is condemned but most theologians who are no longer wrestling with this question because it has been thoroughly dealt with in the literature.

The predictive powers of the book are also quite telling. Predicting most perfectly all the events that had already occurred up until the time the book was published, but the book is all together silent in making any other concrete prediction except that the the world may get more evil or other banal prophecy.

I have read this book more than ten times and it has made an particular mark on my life. As the great author Mark Twain opined, “All men have heard of the Mormon Bible, but few except the “elect” have seen it, or, at least, taken the trouble to read it. I brought away a copy from Salt Lake. The book is a curiosity to me, it is such a pretentious affair, and yet so “slow,” so sleepy; such an insipid mess of inspiration. It is chloroform in print. If Joseph Smith composed this book, the act was a miracle — keeping awake while he did it was, at any rate. If he, according to tradition, merely translated it from certain ancient and mysteriously-engraved plates of copper, which he declares he found under a stone in an out-of-the-way locality, the work of translating was equally a miracle, for the same reason.” The greatest mark the book made on me was the mark on my forehead as I sleepily lifted my head off the desk from falling a sleep reading the thing again and again. I guess that is what comes from 6 AM family scripture study.
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The Book of Mormon
The Book of Mormon by Joseph Smith (Paperback - October 3, 2013)
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