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4.6 out of 5 stars
The Book of Two Guns: The Martial Art of the 1911 Pistol and AR Carbine
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on May 23, 2005
This would be it. I enjoyed this book immensely because it has taken almost every important aspect that I have learned at Thunder Ranch and put it in a concise format that is easy to review and reenforces techniques that you may have forgotten. The tactics presented here are succinct and logical. It amazes me how much I pick up with each new paragraph and Tiger shares tactical aspects from the other schools he attended.

There are grammatical errors in the book and Tiger admits to this right up front but it really doesn't detract from the presentation considering this started as a training diary.

To really absorb the material, read a little at a time, make notes, review it again later until it sticks. There are literally hundreds of practical applications here. Sort of a Reader's Digest version or Cliff Notes of what you really need to know. One of the best books I have every read on fighting with a handgun or carbine.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
I met Tiger McKee when he was an instructor at Thunder Ranch and have since trained with him at his academy. This book is an exceptional review of the major schools, trainers, and modern thoughts on self defense with firearms. It is explained it was originally his personal journal and Clint Smith suggested he publish it. The book is filled with excellent illustrations and summaries of training philosophy. After getting less then halfway through I decided to buy another copy since I was highlighting, taking notes in the border, etc etc.

The book covers all the fundamentals and many advanced concepts. Whether you need to know how to PROPERLY reload, clear malfunctions, carry, configure your weapon... it is all here. As a five time graduate of Thunder Ranch, I can't emphasize that this is a great purchase enough.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on June 29, 2006
You may find that is the only book of it's type you need to purchase. I have a small collection of similar and related tomes, not one of which even begins to cover the subject of gunfighting in such depth. It could reasonably said that it begins where the others leave off yet is not beyond the tyro.

The book opens Author Mckee's training journal for others to read. It is written by a student

warrior for for other student warriors to read and is, therefore,refreshingly free of bluff,bluster and ego. Mckee allows his teachers to speak directly to the reader as well as offering his own insights. While there is much practical detail,the book is very much a Warrior's meditation.

Another outstanding aspect of this book are the hand drawings that serve to illustrate the author's points in a way vastly superior to photographs. As well, the original handwritten text is reproduced with grammer and spelling errors intact, which actually improves the formally informal ambiance of the book.

While no book of this type could ever be deemed to exhaust the subject nor substitute for proper instruction, it seems to this reader an excellent guide to further study.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on November 23, 2005
I picked up T. McGee's BOOK OF TWO GUNS when I was last at Thunder Ranch in Oregon after one of my fellow students showed me the book back at the hotel. That was when I realized it was a MUST HAVE for anyone who has had classes at Gunsite, Thunder Ranch, etc. Though it seems much of the information reflects information provided by Col. Cooper or Clint Smith, even for students of other schools, much of this information is universal...it's just that different teachers use different jargon.

This book has a very unique layout as it truly is a copy of T. McGee's notes. Great hand drawn illustrations. At times, I feel like I am back in class watching Clint Smith illustrate his techniques.

For those who have not had exposure to formal firearms training, at times, the narrative may seem disconnected. But for those who have been through formal training, it is a great reference book.

Though this book may not be for everyone (what book ever really is?), it is an excellent addition any weaponscraft student's library.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on September 13, 2006
Not sure what book 'todd' was reading. This books IS exactly what it states itself to be. The Book of Two Guns is essential reading for anyone on the warrior's path. I have not read a book that more completely welds together mindset, marksmanship and gunhandling. Get it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Tiger Mckee draws from a wide range of experience in order to compile The Book of Two Guns. The information he shares with the readers is not only proven but practiced everyday by students of his trade. Tiger also brings together the concept of fighting with a firearm as many view fighting with the hand. Mental and emotional dedication are a must; going hand in hand with the skills illustrated in this book. Overall, a very strong book for beginners and for the experienced a refreshing look at some of the basics.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on October 13, 2005
It is refreshing to see a book published in this format - hand written notes (well printed) by a student of the martial arts. This book is best read in small bites because of the density of material presented, and the format adds to this method of reading. A great change from the usual highly edited professionally packaged slick contentless dribble.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 20, 2008
Other reviewers here have compared McKee's The Book of Two Guns to Bruce Lee's classic Tao of Jeet Kune Do, and it is an appropriate comparison. Like Bruce Lee's book, too, BOTG chronicle's a warrior's journey to the heart of the most serious game of all. More focused than Lee, though, McKee has created a training manual for armed martial artists, based on his own years of direct experience as student and instructor in some of the best tactical firearms schools in the US. The Book of Two Guns (uniquely hand written and drawn) is a handbook of what works, and no higher compliment can be paid to the book than this: it takes an art that is very complex and daunting, and makes it understandable and accessible.

I have trained at McKee's Shootrite Academy, before and after reading the BOTG, and the book remains my first reference to keep the skills that I acquired there, and to try and learn new ones. When I was working on my own book on historical firearms I used the extensive Shootrite library as a primary source. It is the library of a serious student of gunfighting, just as Shootrite Academy is a serious student's resource for the most effective modern fighting techniques. The Book of Two Guns, which is deceptively simple like all the best martial arts, is the result of a lifetime's apprenticeship to the martial art of the rifle and the pistol.

Hal Herring

Author of: Famous Firearms of the Old West: From Wild Bill Hickok's Colt Revolvers to Geronimo's Winchester, Twelve Guns That Shaped Our History
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 10, 2007
This is the very best practical firearms fighting book I have ever read. Anyone who reads through it and says it is of no use to them is a liar or a fool and best avoided. Listening to those arm chair commandos is nothing but trouble and a waste of time. Anyone with realistic expectations picking this book up won't be disappointed but should know what it is. It is a trainers notes, something he had written for himself from the years of training he has gone through. It is what works for him and may work for you. No where in the book does he push a certain technique or tell you one way of doing something is far superior to another. He clearly says that there are many ways to do something and what works for one person might not work for the other. Reading this book isn't going to make you an expert gun fighter any more than reading the crib notes for Shakespeare is going to make you a Literature Professor. I've seen some reviews talking about the lack of `teamwork' in this book. If you think you can learn real teamwork from a book to begin with this book may not be for you. Having been to the Shootrite Academy I can tell you that the three things you will learn are to move, shoot and communicate. And while it might be up to you to pull the trigger the classes are as much about communicating and working as a team and they are about marksmanship and mindset. I can highly recommend this book with no reservations what so ever.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 10, 2008
McKee's BOOK OF TWO GUNS reminds me a lot of Bruce Lee's classic TAO OF JEET KUNE DO. Like TJKD, BOTG chronicles a man's learning experiences across a broad range of techniques. Also like Lee's book, McKee's is presented almost as a journal, full of the author's own sketches and with an organizational style that can be described as "freewheeling." Last, like Lee, McKee is interested in techniques, pragmatically borrows and modifies from different "schools," and is concerned not just with combat itself but with the philosophy and mindset behind it. As such, McKee makes postmodern gunfighting into a full-fledged martial art. (Which makes sense and is fair -- after all, in the glory days of the samurai, their swords and bows were the pinnacle of extant weapons technology in their world, the equivalent of autoloading rifles and pistols today.)

This book is mostly composed of technique and philosophy/mindset. Unlike most "gun books" out there today, this book is refreshingly NOT obsessed with equipment. Yes, the author briefly describes why he prefers the AR15 carbine and the 1911 pistol, and also explains what modifications and accessories he thinks are worthwhile (and those are minimal -- this guy is not a gadgeteer who puts thousands of dollars worth of space-age optics and lasers and whatnot on a fighting gun, which is also a refreshing change from the norm.) However, though he clearly has his preferences, in another welcome departure from most "gun books," McKee is not dogmatic or insistent about them -- he readily admits that other firearms can work just fine and accomplish the same tasks, too.

While he quotes a lot from the usual suspects like Jeff Cooper, Clint Smith, Bill Jordan, and Fairbairn & Sykes, he also brings in intellectuals, philosophers, and academics such as Sun Tzu, von Clausewitz, Martin van Creveld, and yes, Bruce Lee (who, if you didn't know, had a postgraduate education in philosohy.)

For what it is -- a collection of the highlights of a journal from one man's education in combat -- the book is very good. It is, admittedly, presented almost 'as is' from Mr. McKee's notes -- the text is handwritten with occasional spelling/grammar errors, and the sketches, while mostly pretty good/more than adequate, are not the polished work of a professional artist. Some would call this crude, others would call it honest or authentic. If you're interested in the techniques, philosophy, and mindset of combat, rather than just in the gear, you'll enjoy and learn from this book.
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