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The Born - Einstein Letters: Friendship, Politics and Physics in Uncertain Times (MacSci) Hardcover – December 23, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: MacSci
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (December 23, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403944962
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403944962
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #627,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"In an age of mediocrity and moral pygmies, their lives shine with an intense beauty. Something of this is reflected in their correspondence and the world is richer for its publication."--Bertrand Russel, from original Foreword

"Inspiring bedtime reading for the Year of Physics." --Dennis Weaire FRS, Chair of History of Physics Division, European Physical Society

"Behind every icon lies a human being. Einstein the man emerges from this correspondence with Max Born as thoughtful, engaged and witty, charting the ebb and flow of fortune as he grapples with the scientific and social tumult of the early 20th-century. This record is a priceless resource for historians, and a fascinating read for scholars of all disciplines." --Professor Paul Davies, The Australian Centre for Astrobiology

"These letters display an engaging intimacy, wit, erudition and humanity. They reveal two powerful minds tackling revolutionary ideas while confronted by unprecedented challenges of academic and public life, in an era of profound intellectual and political upheaval. They are vivid reflections of their times, but also timeless." --Philip Campbell, Editor-In-Chief, Nature

"A wonderful insight into the ethos of a unique period in history, as well as into the thinking of these remarkable individuals." --Roger Penrose

"A priceless resource for historians, and a fascinating read for scholars of all disciplines." --Paul Davies, author of How to Build a Time Machine

"Diana Buchwald and Kip Thorne have added a preface that helps the modern reader understand some of the implications of what they come across...Great stuff!" --www.popularscience.co.uk

"The new preface contains valuable brief accounts of the way that physics, after the death of these two great minds, continued along lines they had pursued." --Nature

"This fascinating correspondence between two of the great and subtle figures of 20th-century physics provides a wonderful insight into the ethos of this unique period in history, as well as into the thinking of these remarkable individuals." --Professor Sir Roger Penrose FRS
"A new edition of The Born-Einstein Letters charts the fascinating story of their friendship. A preface by Kip Thorne and Diana Buchwald provides and excellent survey of the conceptual and philosophical issues that came to divide the two men." --Guardian
 
"With a well-informed introductory essay by Buchwald and Thorne, the correspondence is a delight, enabling us to trace the development of the intriguing friendship between the two physicists and to read their views on the great themes of physics and politics of their time." --Times Higher Educational Supplement
 
"An immensely readable personal account of Einstein's struggles with other physicists." --David Bodanis, author of E=mc2 in Washington Post
 

About the Author

Albert Einstein (1879-1955) is one of the most influential figures of the modern era. Working in Germany, Switzerland and US, he radically transformed our understanding of the universe and took an outspoken stance on the significant political and social issues of his time. He was the father of the theory of relativity and a major contributor to quantum theory yet always found time for the political causes close to his heart.

Max Born (1882-1970) won the Nobel prize for Physics in 1954 for his fundamental research in quantum mechanics. He worked at the Universities of Breslau and G"ttingen before Nazism forced his family to flee to the UK, where he held chairs first at Cambridge and later at Edinburgh University. He collaborated with Pauli, Heisenberg, Fermi, Dirac, Raman, and Oppenheimer among others, while also writing and speaking frequently on the social responsibility of scientists.

More About the Author

Albert Einstein (1879-1955) was born in Germany and became an American citizen in 1940. A world-famous theoretical physicist, he was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize for Physics and is renowned for his Theory of Relativity. In addition to his scientific work, Einstein was an influential humanist who spoke widely about politics, ethics, and social causes. After leaving Europe, Einstein taught at Princeton University. His theories were instrumental in shaping the atomic age.

Customer Reviews

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Pletko on July 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
+++++

The highlight of this book by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Max Born (1882 to 1970) is the letters he and Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein (1879 to 1955) exchanged between the years 1916 and 1955. These letters (that were never meant to be published) show the human side of these brilliant physicists.

This book has an overall introduction broken up into seven sections:

(1) Note on this new edition by Gustav Born (one of Max Born's sons).
(2) Acknowledgements for this new edition again by Gustav.
(3) A Modern Preface to this new edition by historian Diana Buchwald and physicist Kip Thorne.
(4) Forward to the original edition by Nobel Prize-winning philosopher Lord Bertrand Russell.
(5) Introduction to the original edition by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Werner Heisenberg.
(6) Acknowledgements to the original edition by Max Born.
(7) A kind of Preamble to the letters again by Max.

Then we come to:

(8) "The Born-Einstein Letters"
(9) "Index"

I recommend reading the seven sections of the overall introduction first before reading the actual letters themselves.

Special mention should be given to the Modern Preface (written in Sept. 2004) to this new edition. This section is very thorough (it has more than 60 footnotes) explaining everything you need to know about the letters themselves.

The "Born-Einstein Letters" themselves are numbered for easy reference. The first letter is dated (Feb. 27, 1916) while the last is dated (Jan. 29, 1955). There are commentaries, explanations, and autobiographical remarks by Born accompanying almost every letter.
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By Grace on December 30, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a book on my husbands wish list and he was surprised to see it. He hasn't read it yet but since it was on his list I'm sure he will love it.,
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Format: Hardcover
This unique book consists of a series of letters exchanged between two good friends, the accomplished physicists Albert Einstein and Max Born. Many of the phrases from this correspondence are practically legendary--and the reason why I read this book!

The principal letter that I sought to find in this collection is the one where Einstein employs the German saying "Junge Huren--Alte Betschwestern"--which translates as something like "Young whores--old bigots." I would be very interested to her any comments on this proverb from German scholars regarding the translation of the word "Betschwester" which would seem to literally translate as "prayer-sister" which might mean something like "church lady" or "nun." Einstein made use of this maxim in his September 7, 1944 letter to Born, in which he reflects on things that he and Born did as much younger men--especially a trip to the Reichstag in Berlin shortly after World War I, in which the two of them expected to impart ideas central to democracy to German politicians of the day. Einstein laughs at their naivete at that time, and makes further comments on the challenges that come with their advancing age. The above cited German proverb seems like a jest that Einstein is directing at Born, indicating that Born is now a stodgy old man and not the wild youth he once was! I should not that the reply to this letter was written by Born's wife Hedi, a convert to the Quaker faith. She comments on Einstein's use of the word "Betschwester" and observes that she, like other Quakers, do not indulge in prayer; instead they consider good works to be the proper way for religious people to express themselves to God. Her comments seem to confirm my observation that the word "Betschwester" can be translated literally as "prayer-sisiter.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vin on August 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Take a great mathematician, add to it the talent of a philosopher, the mindfulness of a Buddhist monk and the intuition of a gifted doctor and you get a world's greatest physicist. This book is a peculiar glimpse into the relationship of two accomplished physicists. The letters touch up on a number of scientific, humanitarian, and political issues. Enlightening account of two intelligent people dealing with the inevitable intellectual and personal differences within the context of their freindship. A fascinating account of Einstein's state of mind during his last days and his general attitude towards dying at the end of the book. The translations are done in questionable English but it only adds to the charm. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Juan Suarez Garcia on January 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is the history of a lifelong frienship between two great scientists, but is much more than this as it covers perhaps the most dramatic period of the history of humanity. Their lives were conditioned by the two world wars which originated the scene in which we all live now in XXI century.
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