The Bourne Supremacy

July 20, 2004 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 20, 2004
  • Label: Varese Sarabande
  • Total Length: 48:23
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002DTZLG4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,561 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 48 customer reviews
I love to listen to movie themes while I am driving to work.
Taurus
One other note of interest...this sound track included Moby's song, "Extreme Ways" this time...an obvious oversight corrected from the last soundtrack.
Bad Dogma
I am impressed by how amazing this music sounds, and how technical.
Matthew A. Grover

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By D. Collier on January 12, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This film score compliments the movie as much as any orchestral piece would compliment a ballet. But there's more to John Powell's upbeat and unconventional film score than just that (though that alone does place it above the average film score).

If one were to listen to this music, not knowing anything about the film, one would hear the music of a heart-pounding action movie, an emotionally-charged drama, and an edge-of-your seat suspense thriller. What I like best is when Powell takes two or three of those themes and weaves them into the same track. He does this best with the opening track, "Goa," "Funeral Pyre," "Nach Deutschland," "To the Roof," and "Alexander Platz/Abbotts Confesses".

I especially love the way the soft, mellow sounds of "Atonement" follow right after the extremely upbeat "Bim Bam Smash". It provides a fitting end to the scoring part of the soundtrack; and ending finally with "Extreme Ways" by Moby.

Other action film soundtracks I'd recommend include THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, PATRIOT GAMES, RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK, and, of course, THE BOURNE IDENTITY.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Carebie on August 8, 2004
Format: Audio CD
If you have bought the soundtrack and have discovered that the song from the Moscow Club scence where the russian assasian is sitting with the ladies, Fear not! It's called "Intothinair" by Mocean Worker and can be found on his album, "Aural & Hearty".
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By HMVincent on July 30, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For fans of the last film's soundtrack, of whom I am one: this one is similar, perhaps too similar. There are no surprises here. If you are new to John Powell's music for the "Bourne" films, you will enjoy this album, but those who already have the older one can safely skip this one: it is as if the older film's music has been retaped with some little extras (guitar, percussion) tossed in. It IS nice that the Moby track is included on this disk.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By NYC Music Lover on September 27, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I have been playing the soundtrack from The Bourne Supremacy (TBS) over and over and I am very impressedhow well this music stands on its own, as well as how well it works in the film. In fact, I believe it is vastly superior to the music for The Bourne Identity (TBI), which sounds more like sketches for TBS.

If you listen to the tracks for TBI on the CD and then see how they work in the DVD, you can hear that Powell was working with weaker material, or at least with weaker development of the original Bourne themes. It's the integration of the music with the movie sequences (e.g., Atonement) which demonstrates the superiority of how he handles his material.

Powell has a tough task, since the Bourne screenplays are not the most powerfully emotional scripts ever written. Rather, they are puzzles, into which cool reserve masks human emotion. In TBS, there really is no emotion after Marie perishes, since Bourne himself is a cipher, whose own life experiences is psychologically supressed. He wants out, but cannot get out, even as far away as Goa.

TBS is filled with grand gestures, which always seem right for the film's sequences: consider his use of strings in the To the Roof sequence, which is largely devoid of other instruments, and is especially reminiscent of pages from Shostakovich...not from his film scores, but from his 8th and 11th Symphonies. Yes, Powell uses a lot of rhythmic drive, especially in his use of percussion. However, the motoric rhythms all seem right: Bourne is a human machine who works according to his instincts, which have been synchronized perfectly due to his training.

As much as I love To the Roof and the Russian car chase scene (Smash, indeed!), it's the Goa, Atonement and Nach Deutschland sequences which are musically most poignant.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Donovan G. Rinker on June 10, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The old spy genre still has space for fresh visions. In Bourne, John Powell has crafted one of the most intense soundscapes ever contrived for film.

From one track to the next, the high tempo pieces move with an unrelenting pace. Yet by the end, one acclimates.

Likewise, the natural instruments mixed in with synths form a strange union, at first slightly jarring, as if the soundtrack included video game bleeps, but ultimately, a strange unity. One acclimates.

Finally - the pace, that relentless set of strings that vies with drum rhythms for your attention. Which raises the question: where is one supposed to listen to it? Too fast for helping concentrate at work/study, too slow for working out, and the exhaustive tendency of sustained tension makes listening to it while driving...well, likely to lead one to attempt film stunts.

In short: I like the sound, I've just no idea when to listen. Which fits Bourne perfectly. Contrast to that other JB-spy, whose familiar, sunny "surf music" guitar theme signals some new intrepid feat by the dapper Brit who fits in anywhere; Bourne, on the contrary, fits nowhere. His theme may signal some feat, or some tragedy, or simply the endless tension.

Yet somehow, Powell strikes a fittingly tragic air - a synthetic tragedy, to be sure, like everything else about Bourne. Should our hero escape some new threat, will anyone care? Not likely. But he struggles anyway. The soundtrack treads tenderly on such bleakness, and as such, reflects what soul Bourne retains.

Don't miss this gem: overlooked almost everywhere, not generally useful for passive listening, yet deep and powerful. Perhaps the ideal soundtrack for a power walk.
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