The Bourne Supremacy 2004 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(604) IMDb 7.8/10
Available in HD

They should have left him alone. Academy Award winner Matt Damon is back as expert assassin Jason Bourne in the stunning, non-stop action hit.

Starring:
Matt Damon, Franka Potente
Runtime:
1 hour 49 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Bourne Supremacy

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Buy the Blu-ray and get the Amazon Instant Video Rental

The Bourne Supremacy (Blu-ray + DVD)

Price: $12.96

Includes the Amazon Instant Video 24 hour rental as a gift with purchase. Available to US Customers Only. See Details

Add to Cart

Product Details

Genres Thriller, Action
Director Paul Greengrass
Starring Matt Damon, Franka Potente
Supporting actors Brian Cox, Julia Stiles, Karl Urban, Gabriel Mann, Joan Allen, Marton Csokas, Tom Gallop, John Bedford Lloyd, Ethan Sandler, Michelle Monaghan, Karel Roden, Tomas Arana, Oksana Akinshina, Yevgeni Sitokhin, Marina Weis, Tim Griffin, Sean Smith, Maxim Kovalevski
Studio Universal Studios
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

I would recommend this film if you liked the first one... great sequel!
Peter N. Anderson
I didnt like this one, but the first Bourne movie was so good, that i cant force myself to give its sequel a bad rating no matter how hard i try.
LDSMARINE
What this densely plotted film does not offer is any deep character development for the actors to work with.
David Baldwin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

107 of 126 people found the following review helpful By Young Kim on December 15, 2004
Format: DVD
There are no world domination conspiracies. No extravagant super-gadgets. No deadly supermodels and megalomaniac geniuses. Just Bourne, his wits, a couple of guns, and whatever else he can get his hands on.

Firmly entrenched in reality (as much as having a martial arts expert with photographic memory, incredible marksmanship and driving skills, coupled with fluency in at least four languages, and spycraft/black ops training is feasible in the real world), The Bourne Supremacy follows in the footsteps of The Bourne Identity to deliver solid action which is a refreshing break from the cartoon shenanigans of Bond.

The film opens two years after the events of The Bourne Identity, where Jason Bourne, a black ops assassin played by Matt Damon, had become amnesiac and severed his ties with the CIA. Jason and his lover, Maria, played once again by the German actress Franka Potente, have been skipping around the globe and are currently hiding in India. However, events beyond his control conspire to drag him back to the conspiracies and machinations of hidden players. An undercover CIA agent is murdered in Berlin, and all the evidence points to Bourne. Brian Cox, Julia Stiles, and some minor players return from the first movie, and Joan Allen is introduced as a high level CIA administrator who wants to track Bourne down. There are plenty of twists and turns along the way, lots of globetrotting, including visits to Paris, Berlin, and Moscow, and great set pieces.

The return of most of the cast from the first movie serves as a great means of establishing continuity. Strangely enough, Ms. Stiles is once again delegated to a very minor role (in the first movie, she was little more than a glorified phone operator), but this time around, she has a key scene with Mr. Damon.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on July 23, 2004
Verified Purchase
Wow! Talk about a taut, mind-numbing set of sequences full of energy, moment and action, this sequel to the original -The Bourne Identity- is that most elusive of entities, a much better, tighter, and suspenseful movie than its original. This sharply spun tale allows Matt Damon to reprise his role as Jason Bourne, the recovering amnesiac CIA spy gone AWOL, this time running for his life through a catalogue of cities from Goa, India to Berlin, and from Berlin to Moscow. And with an action coda that brings to mind the breathless pace of such action classics as Steve McQueen?s -Bullitt-, it is so quick, deft, and terrific one can literally get lost in the activity.

Damon is superb as Bourne, an angry, amnesiac, and absolutely murderous foe for anyone who crosses his path with deadly intent, which seems to happen with stunning regularity in this film. Given the current popular disgust and disdain for the CIA, the movie hits home by portraying its hierarchy as thugs in business suits, bent on silencing Bourne regardless of his innocence or guilt. Damon is losing some of his boy-next-door qualities, but burns up the screen with an Eastwood like set of facial expressions that underplay the emotions and make the dialogue often sparse and terse. His physical presence more than makes up for the verbal void, however. His moves are nothing short of spellbinding.

Luckily, the plot avoids the current morbid Hollywood preoccupation with terrorists, middle Eastern personalities, or religious overtones, and rather chooses to concentrate on more traditional East European skullduggery with undertones of big money and dirty oil deals in setting the stage for murder, mayhem, and some of the most outrageously memorable car chase scenes this side of -The French Connection-.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Liza P on July 28, 2004
Cubby Broccoli started it with James Bond films. Changing directors all the time is one of the ways they have been able to keep James Bond fresh and contemporary, preventing the series from falling into a repetitive pattern.

I assume that was the reason Doug Liman didn't direct this part two of the Bourne saga and passed the megaphone to Paul Greengrass.

All things considered I think the story would have been better with Limans style. Liman put togther a wonderful story that revealed the mystery in a way the always left more questions to come. The action sequences were fast, brutal and believable.

Greengrass in my opinion relied to heavily on hand held cameras during most of the action scenes and even quite a few non-action scenes. I have no objection to use of the "shaky cam" but like a spice, it can be over used and ruin the effect. Instead of connecting the audience to the action overuse of the shaky-cam, made it difficult to follow much of the action.

Most of chase scene had the camera basically in the passenger seat next to Bourne and it moved about so much the audience missed most of the best parts of the action.

Overall the movie was well done, but would have been much much better with Liman back at the helm. In the case of the Bourne movies, I think consistency would be better especially considering how good the first film really was.

Other areas of detail were very good. The bombs used to blow up the electrical panels would most likely have been Semtex in a real mission and the prop bombs had a Semtex like color and texture. I though that was a nice touch. I do appeciate details done correctly.

On the other hand, Greengrass used the TV show style silencer sound (the tweeter).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search