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110 of 129 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The opposite of Bond...and very good for it
There are no world domination conspiracies. No extravagant super-gadgets. No deadly supermodels and megalomaniac geniuses. Just Bourne, his wits, a couple of guns, and whatever else he can get his hands on.

Firmly entrenched in reality (as much as having a martial arts expert with photographic memory, incredible marksmanship and driving skills, coupled with...
Published on December 15, 2004 by Young Kim

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Completes the first movie
Matt Damon is a great actor, who no doubt works very hard at his trade. My hat is off to him! This is a very fast paced movie that somewhat reminded me of Enemy of the State, which stared Gene Hackman and Will Smith. A very fast ride. I also love that it was filmed on actual locations and not somewhere made to look like somewhere else. My favorite scene is that of the...
Published on December 9, 2004 by Jmaybrick


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110 of 129 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The opposite of Bond...and very good for it, December 15, 2004
By 
Young Kim (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
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There are no world domination conspiracies. No extravagant super-gadgets. No deadly supermodels and megalomaniac geniuses. Just Bourne, his wits, a couple of guns, and whatever else he can get his hands on.

Firmly entrenched in reality (as much as having a martial arts expert with photographic memory, incredible marksmanship and driving skills, coupled with fluency in at least four languages, and spycraft/black ops training is feasible in the real world), The Bourne Supremacy follows in the footsteps of The Bourne Identity to deliver solid action which is a refreshing break from the cartoon shenanigans of Bond.

The film opens two years after the events of The Bourne Identity, where Jason Bourne, a black ops assassin played by Matt Damon, had become amnesiac and severed his ties with the CIA. Jason and his lover, Maria, played once again by the German actress Franka Potente, have been skipping around the globe and are currently hiding in India. However, events beyond his control conspire to drag him back to the conspiracies and machinations of hidden players. An undercover CIA agent is murdered in Berlin, and all the evidence points to Bourne. Brian Cox, Julia Stiles, and some minor players return from the first movie, and Joan Allen is introduced as a high level CIA administrator who wants to track Bourne down. There are plenty of twists and turns along the way, lots of globetrotting, including visits to Paris, Berlin, and Moscow, and great set pieces.

The return of most of the cast from the first movie serves as a great means of establishing continuity. Strangely enough, Ms. Stiles is once again delegated to a very minor role (in the first movie, she was little more than a glorified phone operator), but this time around, she has a key scene with Mr. Damon. Ms. Allen has great presence and manages to hold her own in her many scenes with Mr. Cox. Mr. Damon thoroughly inhabits the role of Bourne, convincingly playing a ruthless assassin who, despite intense conditioning to be a remorseless killer, is struggling to regain his humanity. Mr. Damon has once again spent considerable time conditioning himself for the role, and it shows. He is lean, fit, and utterly believable in his fighting sequences. However, more than being just another action hero, Mr. Damon also brings convincing intelligence to the role. The audience can believe that Bourne is constantly thinking two steps ahead of everyone else, that anything can become a weapon in his hands, that he is always considering a way out, and that every act, even simply picking up a bottle of vodka, has a reason.

The image quality of the DVD is excellent, although in parts it seemed too dark. The filming technique used by the director, which involves extensive use of hand-held and shoulder-mounted cameras, has been much criticized, and must have been a dizzying experience in the movie theater, but in the confines of a big screen TV, it serves to bring the viewer right into the action. Granted, some of the quick editing and shaky camera work make a few of the fight scenes claustrophobic and confusing, but that seems to be the desired effect. There are a handful of deleted scenes (which are of much lower video quality and don't really add much to the plot; they are also all strung together - one cannot select individual deleted scenes), director's comment track, and some other production segments. I have not heard the director's commentary or examined the other documentaries, yet. One nitpick of the DVD is Universal's decision to add unskippable advertising at the beginning. One cannot press menu to escape; one is forced to fast forward through the useless ads.

Highly recommended.
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32 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding Entry Into The New Bourne Series!, July 23, 2004
By 
Barron Laycock "Labradorman" (Temple, New Hampshire United States) - See all my reviews
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Wow! Talk about a taut, mind-numbing set of sequences full of energy, moment and action, this sequel to the original -The Bourne Identity- is that most elusive of entities, a much better, tighter, and suspenseful movie than its original. This sharply spun tale allows Matt Damon to reprise his role as Jason Bourne, the recovering amnesiac CIA spy gone AWOL, this time running for his life through a catalogue of cities from Goa, India to Berlin, and from Berlin to Moscow. And with an action coda that brings to mind the breathless pace of such action classics as Steve McQueen?s -Bullitt-, it is so quick, deft, and terrific one can literally get lost in the activity.

Damon is superb as Bourne, an angry, amnesiac, and absolutely murderous foe for anyone who crosses his path with deadly intent, which seems to happen with stunning regularity in this film. Given the current popular disgust and disdain for the CIA, the movie hits home by portraying its hierarchy as thugs in business suits, bent on silencing Bourne regardless of his innocence or guilt. Damon is losing some of his boy-next-door qualities, but burns up the screen with an Eastwood like set of facial expressions that underplay the emotions and make the dialogue often sparse and terse. His physical presence more than makes up for the verbal void, however. His moves are nothing short of spellbinding.

Luckily, the plot avoids the current morbid Hollywood preoccupation with terrorists, middle Eastern personalities, or religious overtones, and rather chooses to concentrate on more traditional East European skullduggery with undertones of big money and dirty oil deals in setting the stage for murder, mayhem, and some of the most outrageously memorable car chase scenes this side of -The French Connection-. This is an exciting movie franchise that one can rest easy about, knowing it will certainly be fleshed out entertainingly over the years by Damon and company. With superbly and smartly produced thrillers like this, why not spin the yarn as far as it will go? Enjoy!
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oh the difference a director makes, July 28, 2004
By 
Liza P (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
Cubby Broccoli started it with James Bond films. Changing directors all the time is one of the ways they have been able to keep James Bond fresh and contemporary, preventing the series from falling into a repetitive pattern.

I assume that was the reason Doug Liman didn't direct this part two of the Bourne saga and passed the megaphone to Paul Greengrass.

All things considered I think the story would have been better with Limans style. Liman put togther a wonderful story that revealed the mystery in a way the always left more questions to come. The action sequences were fast, brutal and believable.

Greengrass in my opinion relied to heavily on hand held cameras during most of the action scenes and even quite a few non-action scenes. I have no objection to use of the "shaky cam" but like a spice, it can be over used and ruin the effect. Instead of connecting the audience to the action overuse of the shaky-cam, made it difficult to follow much of the action.

Most of chase scene had the camera basically in the passenger seat next to Bourne and it moved about so much the audience missed most of the best parts of the action.

Overall the movie was well done, but would have been much much better with Liman back at the helm. In the case of the Bourne movies, I think consistency would be better especially considering how good the first film really was.

Other areas of detail were very good. The bombs used to blow up the electrical panels would most likely have been Semtex in a real mission and the prop bombs had a Semtex like color and texture. I though that was a nice touch. I do appeciate details done correctly.

On the other hand, Greengrass used the TV show style silencer sound (the tweeter). That was just laziness considering how the original film went to lengths to use a more realistic sound effect when Conklin received his "payoff" at the end.

Matt Damon again brought a strong performance to the role of Bourne thus cementing his claim to being a credible action star. Brian Cox came very close to stealing the show with his portrayal of Abbott and Joan Allen was well cast as Pam Landry. It was even nice to see snippets Tom Gallop as Conkin here and there. I'll miss Franke Potente in subsequent films hoping maybe they'll do a soap-opera deal, after all there was no body....

This was a good film but disappointing in two respects. The story was no where near as interesting as the first movie. I would be willing to beet that more than half of the audience in the theater didn't even understand the whole plot even after it had been revealed. That and the overly shaky camera work detracted from what could have been a 5-star film.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bourne is Back!, August 4, 2004
By 
Sequels generally tend to be a bit of a let down, but not The Bourne Supremacy. Matt Damon is back as Jason Bourne, and this time around, Bourne is really angry. The CIA is after Bourne again, this time thinking that he has killed two operatives in Berlin. Bourne was actually 4,000 miles away in India at the time and living with his girlfriend Marie.

There are lots of chase and fight scenes, all choreographed perfectly, though the camera was incredibly jolted throughout and too many closeups make it confusing during hand to hand fight scenes. I overheard several theater-goers complaining of motion sickness afterward. It didn't bother me, I liked it-- it only added to the overall tone of the film, which is one of chaos, confusion, and lots of running.

Great perfomances by Matt Damon, Joan Allen, and Julia Stiles (who truly looked absolutely terrified when Bourne put a gun to her head). This is definitely a thrill ride, one that's fantastic to see on the big screen, unless you get queezy easily. It's not really too important to see the first film either before you see this one. It would no doubt help you get to know the character better though.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Completes the first movie, December 9, 2004
By 
Matt Damon is a great actor, who no doubt works very hard at his trade. My hat is off to him! This is a very fast paced movie that somewhat reminded me of Enemy of the State, which stared Gene Hackman and Will Smith. A very fast ride. I also love that it was filmed on actual locations and not somewhere made to look like somewhere else. My favorite scene is that of the car chase toward the end. The only regrett I have of this movie is how it was filmed. I'm not a big fan of hand-held cameras when shooting a movie. Of course, some shots could not have been possible without the hand-held camera, but then again, other scenes would have been clearer without them. So it's a give and take. I'm still glad I bought this movie. I think you will be glad you bought it too
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the Blair Witch Project, again!, December 9, 2004
By 
F. Thai (Dallas, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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I was really looking forward to the sequel to the Bourne Identity, but what I didn't realize was I was going to relive the "Blair Witch Project" again. The story is good and I really enjoyed Matt Damon in the sequel, but I left the movie with a really big headache--stop moving the camera!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than your average action flick, July 29, 2007
This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy (Amazon Instant Video)
I enjoyed this movie even though I am not a huge fan of straight up action movies. The camera work takes some getting used to. After the first 10 minutes I thought I might get sick, but I got used to it. This movie has a transitional feel to it- think Back to the Future 2 and the second Lord of the Rings movie etc. There is an even better chase sequence in this film than in the first Bourne movie. Matt Damon is good, Joan Allen is excellent as usual, and Julia Stiles has a very small part.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ruined by the camera work, September 17, 2004
By 
JD (Provo, Utah USA) - See all my reviews
Like the majority of reviewers I have seen the first Bourne Identity and I loved the movie. The protaganist, Jason Bourne, is played by Matt Damon, who's previous performances have run the gambit from bad to good, but has been steadily better than most actors.

The story, adapted from the Robert Ludlam novels in a take this-leave that nature, is much better than most adaptations if not completely accurate. I think the first movie is better than the first book in most places, and is certainly smoother. The second movie however, does deviate entirely from the book, with the only real connection being the manipulation of Bourne via Marie. Although this doesn't give the second book much credit, I did find the storyline in the movie easier to get into than the storyline in the book of the same name. The book's storyline would not fair well in today's climate, and I feel a lot of it would be lost on viewers.

As the storyline from the book is missing, so is the Bourne charachter. The novel Bourne relies on his smarts as much as his skills, but movie Bourne falls back on his skills more often than not as he stumbles from one situation to the next with little thought, planning or strategy. As many reviewers have pointed out, he never tries to conceal who he is, which he did heavily in the books. He also never waits for a perfect situation to present itself, instead he plunges into things head first again relying on his amazing skills to save his life - not like the novel Bourne at all. He doesn't try and recruit allies or study his advesaries, another side of Bourne dropped for the movies. While all of this cuts heavily into the Ludlam character, it doesn't ruin Bourne, it merely supplants him with someone else, a little more cinema Bond than true-to-life covert agent, that actually fits the action movie mold better. However, I couldn't help but miss the conflicted and brooding Bourne from the first film. To his credit, Matt Damon still plays the roll very well.

Now, onto the real bad stuff that I have pushed to the end of my diatribe. After previously stating that the first film was smoother than the book of same name (Bourne Identity), this is sadly not the case with the second film. If you can concentrate on the flow of the movie, the script, the setup and the acting, the Bourne Supremacy is great (not stupendous), but great. However, the horrible camera work makes that impossible. I am not arguing against the insertion of the shaky camera technique, as it worked so well in films such as Saving Private Ryan, but in the excessiveness of its insertion, and the excessiveness of the shaking. Too much shaky cam, and way, way too much shaking of the shaky cam. Instead of sticking with the formula of using the up close and personal hand-held camera angle strictly in an acton sense, the Director uses it exclusively throughout the film as if he couldn't tell when to start and when to stop. I was one of those whose excitement at seeing the movie faded in the opening scene when the camera zooms onto Matt Damons upper lip and we watch as the upper half of his head bounces on and off the screen - no joke! And all we are doing is standing in a bathroom looking in the mirror, not running, not fighting, not performing anything at all that warrants this type of camera work. I suffered, and eventually I was able to put the bouncing camera into the back of my mind and concentrate on the film. However, at the rare occasions they switch to a stable platform you let out an involuntary sigh of relief because for a moment you can get your bearings and the screen stops spinning. But alas, it is only for a moment and then the screen starts bouncing and spinning out of control again.

The issue is only compounded during action sequences when a little jarring is to be expected. With the Supremacy, the action scenese are a jumbled mess and a large portion of the film simply takes place out of the view of the lens, which is focusing on a shoulder, wall, floor, upper-right corner of the windshield, etc. Added to that is the darkness that has been heavily layered over this film to the point that you cannot focus on the objects on the screen - when you do suddenly catch a glimpse of something, it is just that, a glimpse! The angle shifts, you are back in shadows and again the camera spins and dips and jumps and flips. When other reviewers commented on members of the audience becoming sick they were not joking - I myself had to look away periodicly just to adjust, and in the screening of the film someone actually threw up.

Without beating the dead horse anymore, this movie is ruined by the camera work. I understand what the Director (Paul Greengrass) was going for, but he didn't succeed. In an attempt to put the viewer on the same level as the actor, we forgoe the structure of a "movie" and enter a "video game" instead - only we don't have the luxury of directing the camera at all. The scenes lose any cinema value because we (the viewers) simply can't see them. The action scenes put you right in the action, but while you realize there is a conflict, you can't tell from where the blows are coming or who the assailant is, nor can we see how Bourne is responding to the attack because he is a blur - see my hands, see his head, see the floor, see my hands, hear a smack but your looking at the wall, someone fell can't tell who they are blur look at wall door wall fist noise - you see where I'm going. Frankly, I won't watch another film Greengrass touches after this one.

If I wasn't such a fan of the first one and if I didn't like the story so much, I wouldn't hesitate to give this movie the lowest possible rating because it is simply UNWATCHABLE. Although this is the type of series that warrants having each installment, this movie will be impossible to watch on your TV - but at least maybe it won't be so overwhelming you need to throw up!
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shake, shake, shake...shake your camera!, February 24, 2005
Loved Bourne Identity. Sorry, but found this film a pain to sit through. I call it the wandering camera technique -- why some directors insist on using it I will never know. But the constant shaking of the camera I find irritating to the point I get physically nauseous. So very many people with whom I have chatted have expressed a similar irritation at this camera technique. Get the camera back on its sticks (tripod), please!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Bourne Suprenacy, July 28, 2004
By 
Michael Zuffa (Racine, WI United States) - See all my reviews
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It has been two years since we last saw Jason Bourne (Damon), and in that time he has been trying to live a "normal" life with his girlfriend Marie (Potente) in India. But quickly, two things go wrong for him. First, someone has killed a CIA agent and planted clues that point to Bourne as the murderer. Second, an assassin has arrived in India to kill him.

While dodging the assassin, he attempts to track down the CIA team that is after him. While the team leader, Pamela Landy (Allen) is new to the situation, Bourne's old boss, Ward Abbott (Cox) is also in the mix. What follows is basically a revenge movie filled with action and intense chase scenes. The final chase is expecially edge-of-your-seat cinema.

Almost all the cast and crew are back for the second installment of the Bourne series, and that provides a nice feeling of continuity. Certainly, the third novel in the series will be made into a movie, and hopefully the same continuity will be preserved with that one as well. Matt Damon once again is the surprising action hero, a role that one would not have thought possible of him a few years ago. Brian Cox is his usual delisiously evil self playing a character whose motives are unclear.

If you found "The Bourne Identy" entertaining, you will not be disappointed with "The Bourne Supremacy". It is a good, smart action movie that keeps you involved from beginning to end. Bring on "The Bourne Ultimatum"!
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