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534 of 554 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2015
Now that we know that this is a fake, made-up story, please pull this from publication. The author has recanted. http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/01/13/the-boy-who-came-back-from-heaven-recants-story-rebukes-christian-retailers/
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191 of 195 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2014
Following reading comments online by Alex Malarkey's mother, Beth, I feel duped by his father, Kevin. I would recommend others do your own research to learn the truth behind this book. According to Mrs Malarkey, she nor Alex ever endorsed, approved, or received a dime of profit from this book, and it seems there were exaggerations and inaccuracies throughout it's content. So very sad.
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102 of 104 people found the following review helpful
on April 10, 2013
Please read Alex's mom's blog before reading this book: [...]

Apparently, Alex does not endorse this book and claim it is deceptive.
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93 of 97 people found the following review helpful
on July 22, 2013
I listened to the audio book and was riveted. Wow!

Then, about a year ago I found out the truth. This book had only one author, and it was NOT the son. Falsehood. An awful tragedy that a (has been) father would chase money in this way -- unbelievable. See the post on April 25 on the mother's blog.
a m o m on a mis s io n dot bl o g sp ot dot c o m

I reeled. And so will you.
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161 of 174 people found the following review helpful
on February 5, 2013
After starting to read this book, I, like everyone else became intrigued with the people of which I was reading about. I came accross Beth Malarkey's personal blog in which she writes about her role as a mom. She also very openly, boldy and clearly states that she has NOTHING to do with this book nor does she support it neither does her son, Alex. Has noone else come accross this?
A part of me feels like I am exposing her and her privacy however, it is a public site and she makes it very clear that she restarted her blog for that very reason. She also goes on to say in her blog that some things are meant to be a surprise and why do we as humans have to always know the unknown?

Very humbling in my opinion and has left me feeling very uneasy about even finishing the book.

An intriguing genre of reading that is certainly the trend these days...truth? or giving hope to the millions of people faced with loss, death and the pain that comes along with that?
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50 of 51 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2015
Based on comments from Alex Malarkey's mum as shown on this website ( http://www.patheos.com/blogs/nolongerquivering/2014/06/the-boy-who-came-back-from-heaven-update/) and a plea from Alex himself (http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/01/13/the-boy-who-came-back-from-heaven-recants-story-rebukes-christian-retailers/), I would strongly encourage you to NOT buy this book. As Alex admits "I did not die. I did not go to Heaven.I said I went to heaven because I thought it would get me attention. When I made the claims that I did, I had never read the Bible". Please do the right thing . Do not buy this book which does not even profit the author, only the booksellers. It's not the truth. If you want to read about heaven, please read the Bible ( as Alex himself urges)
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65 of 74 people found the following review helpful
Book should be titled:

"Social Worker Proselytizes to you and YOU PAY for it. Brief mention of an NDE."

This social worker, who is a fundamentalist Christian, has written a book that is so obviously fundamentalist proselytizing I had trouble reading it. I did - but it was difficult. I find proselytizing offensive. It's as bad as "Heaven is for Real."

Just like that other book, this book condemns most people who have ever lived to hell. Fundamentalist/evangelical types of Christians don't see it that way... they just call it wonderful and inspiring, etc... because they are not THINKING of how it is for most people who ever lived. Ever. So unless you happened to be born into a family that is the "correct" religion, you're going to hell. Wow. How lovely.

The story is MOSTLY about the author, his experiences, and his church, etc. Heavy on proselytizing and EXTREMELY light on NDE, this book is misleading. It is like a VERY long sermon by a hellfire sort of preacher. I regret paying money for it and I WISH I had spent time reading reviews.

I've been researching NDEs for over 30 years - and people of ALL faiths... and NO faith - report the same wonderful NDE. I LOVE hearing NDE stories... but I dislike hearing NDE stories that are so contaminated by fundamentalist religious views that little of the real story remains.

I've heard so many NDE accounts... and I personally NEVER heard one that included "hell" or "the devil" or having to be Christian. Indeed, I've heard these accounts from Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, etc... even atheists. They come back saying "There IS a God!!!!" But they don't come back telling us that they learned if you aren't Christian, you are going to hell. I've never heard that ONCE. I've only read it in books written by people who call themselves "evangelical."

The writing is fair - rather simple but probably fits the most interested of his readers. He mentions his "skeptical training." I am familiar with schooling for social workers and there is almost NOTHING along those lines. He only has a master's degree in social work, for pete's sake! Social workers I've worked with and supervised have the LEAST skepticism and the SMALLEST amount of understanding of science of ANY of the therapist groups. As for counselors (counseling and therapy are DIFFERENT.), the drug counselors, who are only required to have a two-year AA degree, have less training along those lines than the social workers. But be aware that social workers have only a master's degree - two years past their bachelor's degree. It is a VERY thin education and certainly does not give him the kind of skepticism he claims.

The stories about the child seeing "the devil" read to me like hallucinations. Why is it that it is extremely rare for anyone to say such a thing and for people of ALL religions to say there is no such thing after their NDEs? This boy is a CHILD. Those kinds of fantasies are more real to him - just like the Burpo lad. And his "quotes" from Alex. RIDICULOUS! No child talks that way. This is all about Dad figuring out how to make MONEY. Period. You're PAYING for a badly-written, hellfire sermon. You really want to do that?

LASTLY, Alex's MOTHER says this book is rubbish! HERE:

"I am NOT involved with, or desire to be connected with, the book titled The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven. Yes, I am the mom of ALex Malarkey who is NOT an author, nor does he have or has he ever had an agent!ANy questions pertaining to any said experiences that my child did or did not have are for him and only him to answer if and when he desires to(or feels he is supposed to). Right now...he is a kid!Please be careful what you are reading and what cause is benefitting from your purchase of it."

amomonamission dot blogspot dot com

I wish these people wouldn't write this stuff. Out of the MANY religions in the world, how is it that in America, fundamentalist Christians just HAPPEN to be in the "correct" religion? The lack of critical thinking is astonishing.

If you aren't a fundamentalist Christian, save your money. I'm not so arrogant as to think MY religion is the ONLY "true" religion. I want my $8.63 back.
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325 of 391 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2010
For those who have lost a child due to a tragedy or have a child that is currently fighting for their life, this will be a tough read in the beginning. It is about a boy named Alex that was in a car accident at the age of 6 and becomes a quadriplegic. Once he regains conscientiousness and the ability to communicate, he tells his parents of his experience which includes his visit to heaven.

Kevin Malarkey, the boy's father, is very transparent. Throughout the book, he shares with the reader his deepest fears and his shortcomings, including spiritual. In chapter 5 he expresses it with raw emotion - something I admired because not many of us would admit this. "My son couldn't function in the physical world, but it was difficult for me to function in the spiritual world. Who had the greater disability?"

Mr. Malarkey even shared the struggle that all marriages face during the hardships and changes that come with these types of tragedies. It was refreshing to hear a Christian brother share his heart and keep it real.

There is very limited information on Alex' account of heaven but enough for the reader to have a glimpse of our home and most importantly, God's love towards Alex, his family and us all. Some readers may have a tough time with Alex' decision to be obedient in his limited sharing, but it shows that spiritual maturity is not based on age. His greatest concern was to keep it about him - God - and not him - Alex.

The stories about angels were fascinating and will probably challenge the beliefs of many readers. However, for those of you who know that angels are real, his accounts will bring a smile to your face and a tear to the eye.

One thing is for certain, Alex has gone through a life-changing experience and that change has impacted his circle of influence which has grown wider with time and will continue to do so with this book.

I do look forward to the continuation of this story where Alex walks again. However, the reader should be aware that this book is more about this family's struggle then Alex accounts about heaven. It's a good ministerial book for families that are struggling with similar situations.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on April 18, 2012
After reading Heaven Is For Real and absolutely loving it,a friend suggested The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven. From the very beginning, it left me with a very uneasy feeling. Sure I wanted more from Alex, more about Heaven, etc., but what I DID NOT WANT was a father making it all about himself and his guilt. I totally believe in God's grace, mercy and miracles without doubt,and I praise God for what he did for ALEX, but Kevin (the father) seemed to concentrate more on the family's roof, water heater, van, high priced equipment and elite surgeries ... material ... more to me in a sense of bragging (though he does throw shout outs to God and Alex's Army). I believe in Alex, I believe in God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit, I believe in angels and demons ... but I believe more so that this book was BY Kevin Malarkey, FOR Kevin Malarkey ... to capitalize on his 'traumatic ordeal.' He should take a lesson from his son ... Alex was the victim, Alex is the miracle and we heard more whining from Kevin himself!

Disheartened :(
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60 of 71 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2010
I have to say this book is captivating and I got through it pretty quickly. I think the reason I did get through it so quickly was my anticipation of finding out what Alex had to say about heaven.

Unfortunately, very little was said about heaven and what it is like. The word is repeated over and over but no real information is given.

I do feel for the family and know that when going through tough times we search our faith more and more to get us through. I wish them the best in the journey.

So, if you are buying this book with the hopes of someone telling you what heaven is like this is not for you. This is really a personal story of one's journey through a traumatic experience in my opinion.
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