Buy Used
$5.84
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by breaktimebooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book is in used condition. Your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Boy and the Dog Are Sleeping Hardcover – Bargain Price, February 4, 2003


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Bargain Price, February 4, 2003
$2.47 $1.34

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0345453891
  • ASIN: B000FA4VL4
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,781,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Three decades old and counting, the worldwide AIDS epidemic has touched millions of lives. It has also yielded a sorrowful library of memoirs and tributes, among the most memorable entries in which is this compelling portrait of a child born into illness and determined to beat it.

Born of a Navajo mother, Nasdijj met 11-year-old Awee while still mourning the loss of his own son. "AIDS had knocked him out," Nasdijj writes. "But Awee was a fighter. He always got back up again." Determined to help Awee in that fight, Nasdijj recounts the miseries of dealing with indifferent doctors and Indian-agency bureaucrats ("Anglos," he writes, "would never tolerate the kinds of limited options Indians have to live with every day"), of seeking avenues of relief from pain that lead into back alleys and other tortured lives, of finding reasons for hope against an ever-stronger enemy--one of whose most powerful guises, he tells us, is loneliness.

"Why would anyone sane adopt a child with AIDS?" Nasdijj writes, answering his own question: "Because one comes to you. Because you can." This tragic, beautifully written memoir encourages us all to do more. --Gregory McNamee --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Could the story be simpler? Man adopts dying child, child dies, man grieves. And yet, in the hands of Nasdijj, Navajo author of The Blood Runs like a River Through My Dreams, this experience is a window into the larger question of what's really important in life. Many would agree that for Awee, an 11-year-old boy dying of AIDS, formal schooling is unnecessary and impractical. What it comes down to, Nasdijj discovers, is providing his dear son with as many wonderful experiences as he can, from playing baseball and flying kites to discovering his first lover and volunteering at a Head Start program to feel "the power of giving back." When a child has AIDS, Nasdijj learns, there's "no later-safe to store your valuables in." Nasdijj also finds himself doing things he didn't want to do. Father and son live in run-down hotels near big-city hospitals, instead of on the reservation, where adequate medical care isn't available. When Awee's pain increases, Nasdijj obtains morphine prescriptions; later, he's forced to buy him street heroin. As Nasdijj depicts the child's ravaged body, many readers might find themselves sympathizing and wondering what parent wouldn't break any law to give their child some relief from the "ice picks" and "razor blades" of pain. Beyond this disease, Nasdijj writes about love and the way love shows people how to live. This is a powerful and rare display of visceral, emotional writing.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Matyowynne on January 25, 2006
Format: Hardcover
As an actual, real Navajo tribal member and as a writer I'm pretty disgusted by this. A hoax it is and pretty pathetic. I'm always surprised at how little most Americans know about my people. It's pretty disheartening. Definitely read the LA Weekly article [...] for more on the Navahoax. If you want real Navajo writing read Lucy Tapahanso or for great writing read Leslie Marmon Silko (a Pueblo writer).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Price on January 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Nasdijj is NOT NAVAJO (Dine). He is a White guy from Michigan. He lied about being "Dine". His real name is Tim Barrus. As a member of the Dine Nation I am Truly disgusted with this fraud.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By E. Royce on January 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Hmmm.

Evidently the guy is actually white, Son of the Revolution, descended from Dutch ancestors and has as much Navajo blood as I do, and I'm from South Korea. The LA Weekly ran an expose of this nonsense in an article called "Navahoax".

So. Just how "seared" are you people? How overwhelmed are you now that you know it's a complete work of fiction and has no relevance to reality whatsoever? That the author is actually a white guy who grew up in a middle class life and went on to write gay leather fiction before trying his hand at being a Native American.

Frankly I give it one star because, what the hey, he took all of you in didn't he?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Victoria Sharp on December 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is really disgusting. The narrator seems to be a pedafile. I am sorry I wasted my money on this book and that my money went to support someone who produces this sort of trash.

It really outrages me that the only problem that people have with this book is that the author is a fake and not that this book is drenched in incestuous / pedafilic undertones.

Here are some quotes directly from the book:

This is the father talking about his son, Awee:

"Awee could be seductive. It scared me deep down into my bones where I hurt with him and me and all the things we could never be. Father and son would have to be enough. Even sith AIDS, Awee stood poised on the cusp of adolescence, and in his anxiety, he wanted everything. His vulnerability was awesome. I have seen him more than naked."

The son Awee tells his father

"I want to ride the bike naked with you at night."
The father then describes, "the dark hard against our balls. His arms around my belly. Holds fathers to their sons like fans."

The father says of his son
"I wish he would kiss me..."

The father describes his sons underwear: "I picked them up. His underpants. They do feel soft against my face..."

Father and son "Together. Shaving at the sink. Nude."

"All I could do to calm Awee is to hold him tight, let him melt into me, surround him with something of the softness of my darker places.

The father says of his son, "I was in love with him."

The father describes his feelings for his son:
"Monster that I am I will kiss upon the beauty of your bones. And sleep fitfully in sadness like a lover lost in moans."

The father describes his son:
" I wish he would sleep. He is so dangerous.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Hamilton on June 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Native American author Nasdijj delivers an unforgettable memoir with The Boy and the Dog Are Sleeping, a chronicle of the death of his adopted son, a 12-year-old Navajo born with AIDS. Nasdijj, whose first son, also adopted, died of fetal alcohol syndrome, is persuaded to adopt Awee by the boy's parents, also AIDS patients. Against his better judgment, Nasdijj agrees. Taking on hopeless boys is something of an addiction with him, he admits.
"I want the mad ones," Nasdijj writes. "The children who have had everything taken away from them. The children who are broken and mad enough to attempt to repair themselves. The children mad enough to spit and fight."
Nasdijj makes some unorthodox decisions about how Awee should spend his last weeks of life, choices he suspects minivan moms would not approve of. Instead of hunkering down in a hospital or hospice, with pill bottles and intravenous drip close at hand, Nasdijj takes his son on a motorcycle to the coast, lets him play baseball, lets him spend the day in an auto repair shop and introduces him to several Indian rites of passage.
Along the way, Nasdijj exposes the failure of America's health care system to provide relief for indigent AIDS patients, especially those on Indian reservations, where welfare hospitals may take as long as six weeks to return blood test results. Awee is frequently in and out of the hospital-with pneumonia, with terrible pain from nerve damage, with sarcoma.
The most scathing criticism Nasdijj offers is the health care industry's failure to relieve a 12-year-old's pain. Here, Nasdijj runs up against a medical brick wall. Pain medications for children with AIDS haven't been developed, he writes, and doctors are unwilling to experiment.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gary Sites on July 20, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was one of my favorite books until I found out that the author made it up, and passed it off as memoir.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Marie Brunstein on February 22, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Have not read the book, but the service was great. I appreciate the honesty of the book description. I buy used when I can and have not been mislead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?