The Boy in the Moon and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.42
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Boy in the Moon: A Father's Journey to Understand His Extraordinary Son Hardcover – April 26, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, April 26, 2011
$2.51 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312671830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312671839
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,080,346 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A father’s candid, heart-wrenching account of raising, loving and trying to connect with and gain insight into his severely disabled son...Much more than a moving journal of life with a disabled child; it is about Brown’s quest to understand his son and his son’s condition...An absorbing, revealing work of startling frankness."--Kirkus Reviews
 
“The truth Brown learns from his severely disabled child is a rare one: The life that seems to destroy you is the one you long to embrace.”--New York Times Book Review

"Unforgettable...Crisp, observant and, occasionally, subversively funny...In the end, as in the beginning, Brown questions the value of a life like Walker's, "lived in the twilight and often in pain." He sometimes locates it in Walker himself. Another answer is this book."--Cleveland Plain Dealer

 
"Honest and deeply moving."--Tucson Citizen

About the Author

IAN BROWN is an author and a feature writer for The Globe and Mail. The Boy in the Moon has won three of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards: the Charles Taylor Prize, the Trillium Book Award, and the British Columbia National Book Award for Nonfiction.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The book tells a story about raw true love.
Daniela
Sometimes it seemed like the most urgent question of all.
J. Murray
I'm glad I read this book; it gave me something.
Nancy A. Spivey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By J. Murray VINE VOICE on April 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Ian Brown's memoir, The Boy in the Moon (St. Martin's Press 2011), is an eye-opening trip into parenting a special needs child. In this case, Ian Brown and his wife have a severely disabled child with an orphan disease (one which is not studied or researched much), making both diagnosing and dealing with the disease difficult. This particular disease, CFC (cardiofaciocutaneous disease) is extremely rare, gets worse as the child matures and can't be cured. The story deals primarily with the Dad's struggle to come to terms with his son's life as a CFC sufferer.

Ian Brown didn't ask to parent a disabled child--no one does--but once there, he accepts the job with vigor, grace and resolve. I am constantly impressed with his patience toward his son Walker, his resiliency in the face of one disaster after another and his hope that there will be a better life for his son (and he admits, for himself and his wife. No surprise, they struggle to maintain a strong marriage when the fulcrum of their marriage becomes their son). Through Ian, we all gain courage to accept that job, should we ever be in his shoes. He starts the journey full of hope that his child will be 'fixed', tries every cure, never shies away from any effort that could result in 'normalcy' for his son. In the end, he achieves his goal, but it's not what he expected. Rather than changing his child to fit into the world as 99.9% of people understand it, he changes to accept Walker as a full, complete, wonderful boy in a world that shouldn't consider him disabled just because he is the minority.

The first third of the book deals with Walker's life as seen through the eyes of his parents--his birth, his maturation, their efforts to squeeze their square peg boy into the round hole that is a normal Canadian child.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Trudie Barreras VINE VOICE on May 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is powerful in so many ways that I really don't know where to start. I could go on for pages discussing all the things I find important about it, but I believe that is far beyond the scope of a review by a non-expert, and think that in this case, "less is more". Therefore I will limit myself to a few observations.

For me, the most important thing about the story of Walker Brown and his family is that it builds a stunning case for the premise that, in an unforgettable quote that I first encountered in the play J.B.: "To be human is to love, and to love is to suffer." Throughout the book, as Ian strives to communicate with Walker, to deal with the extreme deficits in development and the pain and trauma these produce, he keeps encountering over and over again the reality of Walker's humanity and his own in the love and suffering they share.

Another great gift I found in this book is Brown's unyielding search for a community of caring for Walker, which included experiencing the L'Arche communities. I have long been interested in these communities, and in fact have read much of the work of Henri Nouwen. Indeed, about halfway through Brown's story, before I actually came to the part where he does describe these encounters, I began to wonder, "Has he heard of L'Arche?" I was delighted to find that this was an important part of his own pilgrimage, and his response verified much of what I already understood from my previous reading.

Also rewarding to me is the fact that Brown has reached his level of insight without the benefit of any strong religious faith, and without resorting to religious platitudes. However, the core belief that human life - ALL human life - is uniquely valuable is intrinsic to the spirituality that underlies religion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robin Wolaner on June 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I met Ian Brown decades ago, although we are not in touch, which is why I noticed this book when it was published in Canada. I didn't read it, though, until after the rave review in the NY TImes, and I am so glad I did.

I used to think of parents with disabled children as heroic -- used to wonder if I could be as heroic as they if I were not blessed with healthy children. Having read The Boy in the Moon, I see their lives differently. The children are the heroes, and while I would not call a parent blessed to have their life so rearranged, I understand the use of that term now. This book is fascinating, inspiring, and moving. The philosophical aspects are not the kind of writing I generally read -- but made me think, and learn.

If anyone called this book depressing, they must have read a different book. I feel lucky to have discovered it, and enriched. That is Walker's gift, and our luck that his father's gift is writing, as well as parenting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nancy A. Spivey on May 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I did not really find this book depressing at all. And as to other reviewers, who did not understand the author's point in writing this book, I disagree with that as well. A book does not have to have a happy ending, or even a "conclusion", if it is non-fiction.

I was inspired by the author's lack of self-pity. Though the fate that befell this family was a hard one, he was able to find some small joys in his handicapped son. It must be incredibly frustrating to have a child who cannot communicate his needs or wishes, and yet Mr. Brown never says "poor me". I found myself thinking that if I had to deal with this situation, I hope I would be as strong.

I'm glad I read this book; it gave me something. That to me, is a positive thing, even if what it gave me was sometimes painful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews