Similar Items at a Lower Price

Boys Wanted and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $2.55 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 28? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Boy Recession Hardcover – August 7, 2012


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, August 7, 2012
$15.44
$0.50 $0.01 $6.00

Frequently Bought Together

The Boy Recession + Hemlock
Price for both: $29.80

Buy the selected items together
  • Hemlock $14.36

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Poppy; 1 edition (August 7, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 031610213X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316102131
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,324,297 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 8-11-Budget cuts at Julius P. Heil High cause the football coach and all the players pursuing college scholarships to leave for prep schools with better prospects. Suddenly the remaining guys at the small school near Milwaukee find their girl appeal soaring. Longtime friends Hunter Fahrenbach and Kelly Robbins narrate the events of their unusual junior year in separate chapters. Easygoing, long-haired Hunter not only attracts spandexer Diva, who proclaims him her boyfriend, but also unexpectedly stars in the school musical. His entrepreneurial friend, Eugene, expands his business enterprises of securing cigarettes and alcohol for underage users by setting up an escort service for girls needing dates to the prom. Dependable "nice girl" Kelly realizes her feelings for Hunter have changed from friendly to romantic when they set up a musical mentoring program for elementary students after the school band is eliminated. Her friend Aviva documents developments in the boy recession for the online school newspaper. Despite mishaps and misunderstandings, all plotlines lead to Kelly and Hunter getting together to attend prom. Their narrative voices sound similar, although he spices his chapters with profanity. Their breezy, fast-paced accounts incorporate humorous situations and witty comments. Standard fare for readers searching for romance with a neatly packaged happy ending.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankatoα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

When the town’s two biggest, boy-heavy families send their sons to private school, there’s a noticeable shortage of testosterone at the local high school. Kelly, understandably, is concerned—what will this mean for future boyfriend material? But it’s good news for Hunter, who is basically the world’s cutest slacker, and his friends, who can now have almost any girl they want. The school newspaper deems it the great boy recession and chronicles the effects on the school’s decimated male population. In addition to the lack of guys, there’s an actual recession going on, and the school band is completely, er, disbanded, throwing Kelly and Hunter together to institute a youth band program for elementary students. As Kelly’s crush on Hunter begins to grow, she finds herself in danger of losing him to one of the popular (read: trashier) girls at school. What to do? Meaney’s laugh-out-loud dialogue and vulnerable protagonists—they split first-person narration duties—assure this charming crowd-pleaser a varied audience. Grades 9-12. --Courtney Jones

More About the Author

Flynn Meaney is the author of Bloodthirsty and The Boy Recession. She is an alumna of the University of Notre Dame and has an MFA in Creative Writing from Hunter College. To learn more about Flynn, visit her website: www.flynnmeaney.com.

Customer Reviews

There's very little connection to the characters and the story.
Sabrina H.
The Boy Recession is filled with hilarious scenes in addition to some really sweet moments between Kelly and Hunter.
Kris
The Boy Recession is perfect for young adult and teenage readers.
Chels

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chels on August 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Meaney wrote a book that had me laughing from cover to cover. The plot focuses on the effects of a "boy recession" at a high school. When 12% of the boys leave the school, the remaining guys find that they are now in high demand. Boys who never played a sport before are on the football team and guys who could never hope for a date find that they are surrounded by desperate girls. This book is told from two perspectives, the first is Hunter. At first, he is unaffected by the exodus of the guys from his school. Hunter is a brilliant slacker who doesn't put much effort into anything he does. This changes after being yelled at by a high school advisor and meeting Kelly, the second narrator of this book. Kelly is sweet, nice, and musically gifted. She finds herself drawn to Hunter, she likes his easy-going personality. As the two grow closer, the problems that come with a boy recession begin to interfere with their friendship.
The Boy Recession is perfect for young adult and teenage readers. Meaney's writing is humorous and creative. All the characters stand out and are memorable. I can't wait to read Meaney's next book and I give this novel five out of five stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Welling on August 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
First Impressions: I really liked Bloodthirsty by Flynn Meaney, so when I realized that The Boy Recession was written by her I was stoked! This book just sounded like such a fun read, plain and simple. I like how the cover art reflects what the book is about in a very creative way.

First 50 Pages: This isn't a terribly long book and I read it in its entirety in just a couple of hours. It would be perfect for someone who is trying to squeeze in a book or two before going back to school (which is why I decided to read it when I did) because it's so short and so enjoyable. There isn't really anything deep or heavy about The Boy Recession. From the beginning to the end, it's just a lot of fluff and the humor is awesome. I laughed so many times while reading this story. It's the kind of book that you want to pick up if you are feeling down because you won't be able to stop laughing. I thought that the author did a really nice job setting her scenes and giving each of her characters distinct voices.

Characters & Plot: The book synopsis that was provided by the publisher basically gives away most of the plot. The story follows Kelly and Hunter who each give their own perspective of the literal boy recession that is occurring at their high school. The points of view from each character are really well done and they seemed to go well together. Sometimes when you have more than one point of view in books the writing seems choppy, but that wasn't the case here. Kelly and Hunter are friends, but I believe they were both secretly (and maybe unknowingly) attracted to each other before the shortage of boys hit their school.

The girls that go to their school are going bonkers and the recession brings out the worst in most of them.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brittany Moore VINE VOICE on October 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
When all the jocks transfer to a different school. Julius P. Heil High finds itself in a bit of a boy recessions. The poor teen girls, aren't really sure what to do. They end up finding the misfits a not so bad replacement for their absent sex gods. Hunter can't believe that this is actually working in Eugene's favor. How can these girls really be interested in him, when before they wouldn't have spoken two words? Kelly is mostly upset that not only is it a boy recession but budget cuts that plague the school. That means no more band. Then Hunter suggests that they do peer band and teach third graders how to play instruments. Kelly jumps at the chance to have band back. She also doesn't mind spending some time with Hunter. She's not the only one who wants some face time with him. A boy has become a hot commodity at Julius P. Heil, and Hunter is in high demand in lots of places. Kelly doesn't want to lose him to the heard, but some girls play for keeps and will stop at nothing to sink their teeth into the boys that are left. Hunter is just going with the flow, even when the flow takes him places he doesn't particularly enjoy.

This was a cute book. There were quite a few funny moments in the book. I love how blown out of proportion the boy recession is. Everything is extra dramatic, but not quite over the top. Kelly and Hunter were sort of outside looking in at all the madness. They each had a friend who was ensnared in the hysteria. Luckily, both Kelly and Hunter managed to keep a cool head while things around them were chaos.

This was a fun concept, and a great setting. A small town losing most of it's football team, including it's coach would definitely be a big deal in a small town like this one. People also would notice when a handful of attractive guys left.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
Originally posted at arielavalon.com

Julius P. Heil High has about 250 students, and a general ratio of more girls than guys. But when budget cuts drive the desired football couch across the country, a lot of families pull their boys out to go to private schools where they can have a shot at getting their coveted football scholarships. This has left the school with a 4:1 ratio of girls to boys, making even the geekiest boys a hot commodity. Kelly is a down-to-earth girl, not the type to get noticed by boys to begin with, and because of the lack of boys, her friend Hunter has gotten quite popular. When she realizes that she likes him, she can't think of how she could possibly compete for him. Now she is out to try to make him see her so that she might win his heart.

This book was cute. The idea was really nice and I was looking forward to it, but in the end I was rather disappointed. The story switches points of view between Kelly and Hunter, which I loved. I loved being able to see both sides of things. It really allows you to get to know both characters and it helps give you a connection to them. You want to root for them.

Kelly and Hunter are both really likable. They are also pretty cute together, which is a plus in a romance setting. Their friends are all fabulous as well. They all had their faults and strengths and were just generally well-rounded. The friends were all funny to read about as well, which was nice. It made for quite a few places where I would laugh aloud or smile to myself from something cute happening.

The plot was really simple, and that's where the story suffered. Things felt rushed. There were time skips randomly through things, and things would be mentioned as an after thought.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa2adf5b8)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?