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The Boy in the Snow: An Edie Kiglatuk Mystery (Edie Kiglatuk Mysteries) Hardcover


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The Boy in the Snow: An Edie Kiglatuk Mystery (Edie Kiglatuk Mysteries) + White Heat: The First Edie Kiglatuk Mystery (Edie Kiglatuk Mysteries)
Price for both: $33.94

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Product Details

  • Series: Edie Kiglatuk Mysteries
  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Adult (November 8, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780670023691
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670023691
  • ASIN: 0670023698
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,237,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Canadian High Arctic native Edie Kiglatuk is diverted from her main mission in Alaska—to back up her ex-husband, Sammy Inukpuk, in the Iditarod—when she finds the body of an infant boy in the snow. Police suspect that the Old Believers, a sect broken from the Russian Orthodox Church, are behind the baby’s death and arrest one of its members, a man Edie saw in the area. But even outside the comfort zone of her native Ellesmere Island, Edie is fierce in her desire for justice for the baby and is driven to find the truth. With the help of her friend, police sergeant Derek Palliser, who’s also in Alaska to help Sammy, she uncovers a scheme of sex trafficking of underage girls and the black-market sale of babies. Half-Inuit Edie, who debuted in White Heat (2011), here finds herself at mortal risk from the cold, so masterfully described that it chills the reader. McGrath adds an element of Inuit spirituality to this fast-moving mystery of corruption and cover-ups, meeting expectations established by the compelling series opener. --Michele Leber

Review

Praise for The Boy in the Snow

 
“An Arctic setting so real it’ll give you frostbite.”—Dana Stabenow, New York Times bestselling author of The Singing of the Dead
 
“McGrath has a firm grasp on a little known culture, its values and language…This affecting novel should melt even the most frozen human hearts.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Edie is fierce in her desire for justice…[She] finds herself at mortal risk from the cold, so masterfully described that it chills the reader.”—Booklist
 
“In M.J. McGrath’s  gripping Alaskan mystery…[her] characters are both motivated and ruthless.—Oprah.com

“The plot compelling and the settings mesmerizing. McGrath…is a fresh and compelling voice.”—Cleveland.com
 
“The stoic Edie is a strong, determined heroine.”—Houston Chronicle
 
“Tautly plotted, truly satisfying suspense.”—BookPage
 
“M.J. McGrath [has] a terrific gift for the atmospheric portrayal of cold, ice and snow – and of the people who live in those climes.”—The Times (UK)
 
“[McGrath] is an author with a quietly impressive command of character…Yet the author’s real skill is in the astonishing evocation of the frigid landscape…What’s more, McGrath is able to keep all these elements satisfyingly balanced.”—Express.co.uk
 
“One of our most gifted younger writers…The snow-laden wastes of Alaska are so brilliantly evoked that hit almost makes you shiver reading it, and the plot is every bit as chilling, laced as it is with politics, sects and modern greed.”—Daily Mail (UK)
 

Select Praise for White Heat 

 
“M.J. McGrath opens a window onto a fascinating and disappearing culture in this haunting mystery.”—Parade Magazine “12 Great Summer Books”
 
 
 
“[McGrath] weaves a strong strand of whodunit into a broader story about life in a 21st-century community on Canada's Ellesmere Island. The plot is wholly satisfying, and McGrath's portrait of a culture that uneasily blends yesterday and today is engrossing on its own merits. The Arctic is a big place — big enough, one hopes, for Edie Kiglatuk to find another mystery that needs solving between warm bowls of seal blood soup fresh from the microwave.”—Associated Press 
 
 
 
“A gripping debut novel, McGrath transports the reader to a land of almost incomprehensible cold and an unfamiliar but fascinating culture, taking on issues of climate change, energy exploration, local politics, and drug and alcohol abuse. Edie, a fiercely independent woman in a male-dominated milieu, is sure to win fans. Expect great things from this series.”—Booklist (starred)
 
  
“An arctic setting so real it’ll give you frostbite.”—Dana Stabenow, author of A Cold Day for Murder and Though Not Dead: A Shugak Novel 


“M. J. McGrath’s White Heat pulls you along like a steel cable, inexorably welding you to the characters and a place that you’ll never forget.”—Craig Johnson, New York Times bestselling author of The Cold Dish and As the Crow Flies

 
“This debut novel encompasses the hard, otherworldly beauty of the far north and the rapaciousness of energy moguls determined to exploit the area’s natural resources…[McGrath] skillfully describes the destabilizing effects of global warming, on both the landscape and the lives of the people settled there.”—The New Yorker
 


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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Poor plot, repetition of the same words, phrases, ideas.
Catherine Sebek
The ending is abrupt and the plots wrap up too neatly thanks to some improbably convenient revelations.
TChris
M.J. McGrath has found a genuine character and a genuine setting she is good at.
Nancy K. Jones

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Philly gal VINE VOICE on November 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is the second Edie Kiglatuk novel by MJ McGrath. In this mystery Edie, an Inuit from near the Arctic Circle is in Alaska to support her ex husband Sammy in his Iditarod race. In a walk in the woods prior to the race, Edie finds a frozen corpse of an infant boy. Who he is, how he died and how he came to be placed in the woods serves as one of two major story lines. The second story line centers on tourism land development and the cut throat politics that is involved in it. Edie relentlessly follows the clues related to the infant death wherever they take her. An Old Russian Orthodox community comes under suspicion for the child's death because Edie has reported seeing some members of this community near the spot where she found the boy. Local prejudices against this reclusive community lead the local police to the Old Believers for their murder suspect.
The look we get into Inuit culture and customs and descriptions of the landscape of the frozen North are the strong suites of this story. The author knows this culture and is able to weave into this story many aspects of this fascinating native community. A scene later in the novel where the characters fight for survival is compelling in its realism. Unfortunately the mystery and its characters do not hold up through this story. Edie as the heroine is hard to like; she is somewhat self righteous and lacking in emotion (is Derek a love interest a/o partner -impossible to tell from this story). The two storylines which finally intersect are improbable at best. The denouement is way too convenient to accept.
In my opinion the first novel in this series, White Heat was stronger than this one. I still think this could be a good mystery series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dorothy J Laird on May 28, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The dreariness became relentless. When I find myself shouting at a book because the main character refuses help or cannot compromise I give up and don't finish it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Cluny on March 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover
A good story needs fully developed characters and even with the best plot imaginable, if the characters are not brought fully to life and reader can invest or relate to them in some way a great plot is somewhat wasted. The main character, Edie Kiglatuk, in this book is lackluster. It is only in the last pages that you are told what compelled her to be so invested in "The Boy in the Snow" 's death. I rated this three stars because Alaska is the sole fully developed character in the book. I do not feel compelled to read any further books in the series. My recommendation is get this from library if you decide to read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TChris TOP 100 REVIEWER on November 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Edie Kiglatuk is an Inuit from Ellesmere Island; she thinks Anchorage is uncomfortably hot and crowded. She's there for the Iditarod, supporting her ex-husband's participation in the race. Before the race starts, however, Edie gets lost in the forest while following a spirit bear. She encounters a couple who warn her that she is on Old Believer land while grudgingly pointing her in the direction of the road. Making her way back to her snowmobile, Edie finds a frozen baby inside a small structure that resembles a dog house. A cross has been marked on the baby's body. The police tell Edie that the small house she found is a spirit house used in Athabaskan religious ceremonies. Soon another frozen baby is discovered in a spirit house. The police clearly want to blame the deaths on the Old Believers, former Russians who, having separated from the official Russian Orthodox Church, cling to ancient liturgical practices. Rumors abound that the babies were kidnapped by the Dark Believers, a Satan worshipping sect of the Old Believers that may not actually exist. Perhaps to lay those rumors to rest, the police arrest an Old Believer who seems as likely a suspect as any. Edie, of course, believes he's innocent.

A second storyline concerns Alaska's gubernatorial election. Anchorage Mayor Chuck Hillingburg is running against a popular incumbent. The reader knows that Hillingburg is tied to a lodge that has something to do with the deaths, but the nature of the connection remains a mystery until Edie puzzles it out. A third storyline concerns the Old Believers' theory that they are being framed by Tommy Schofield, a property developer who wants to acquire land that the Old Believers refuse to sell.

Edie is an annoyingly self-righteous character.
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By MissAda on February 27, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had read M.J. McGrath's book that took place prior to "The Boy in the Snow". This is an excellent read and it is so nice to have a location not usually addressed in novels and people that seem human with their own faults. There were several misspellings, however and that is disconcerting, especially mixing up how 'their' and "there" should be properly spelled.
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By Mason Canyon on November 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
Reaching for a throw to ward off the chill, I realized I had been captivated not only by the story but also by the setting in author M.J. McGrath's latest novel, THE BOY IN THE SNOW.

In this second Edie Kiglatuk mystery, McGrath has cast the Alaskan setting as much a character as her protagonist Edie. Her vivid descriptions brings the setting to life placing the reader in the middle of the snow and cold Edie calls home.

Half-Inuit Edie Kiglatuk is on her way to help her ex-husband Sammy in his bid to win the famous Iditarod dog sled race when she gets a bit sidetracked. Lead by a spirit bear, Edie discovers a dead infant in a small wooden box in the forest.

Officials believe the death has something to do with the Dark Believers, a sinister offshoot of a Russian Orthodox sect since it was discovered on their land. However, Edie doesn't see it that way as she believes there's more to it.

Meanwhile, the office of Alaska governor is up for grabs and the election is heating up. The last thing Anchorage Mayor Chuck Hillingberg wants is Edie's discovery made public.

THE BOY IN THE SNOW is a gripping mystery that will have you clinging to the edge of your seat. The story flows smoothly and at a quick pace. The twists keep you guessing as painful secrets aren't revealed until the last few pages.

McGrath has developed realistic and likable characters. She has given them strengths, but also faults and worries that readers can relate to. An eye for detail, McGrath surrounds the reader with the Alaskan territory, its people and ways.

This is the second installment in the Edie Kiglatuk Mystery series, but can be read as a standalone.
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