The Boy Who Owned the School and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Boy Who Owned The School Paperback – October 1, 1991


See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 1, 1991
$31.96 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 1070L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling; Reprint edition (October 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440405246
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440405245
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.1 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,183,653 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Most of the action of this farcical novel takes place at the high school where Jacob Freisten's primary goal is to remain unnoticed. All too often this classic loser finds himself cornered by some bully. When he is not being stuffed inside a locker or a trash can, Jacob suffers other forms of humiliation that are relayed in a string of colorful anecdotes. While running laps around the gym, he accidentally tramples Maria Tresser, the most beautiful girl in the school. Cupid's arrow strikes, and Jacob's seemingly hopeless infatuation leads to one disaster after another; but he finally wins a date with the girl of his dreams. Although Paulsen's pace may leave some readers breathless, most will relish the sharp wit and incredible energy of this ironic glimpse of high school life and young romance. Ages 11-14.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-8-- Jacob Freisten, thin and freckled, the "ugliest boy in history except for one," according to his own assessment, and a total clod to boot, has perfected the art of near invisibility, of being "there but not there." He leads the kind of exaggeratedly painful life that requires careful timing and planning so he can avoid attracting attention; if people notice him, there's always a comic disaster. He even goofs up in his daydreams. His parents drink too much, his mother is devoted to his sister's blossoming career as a beauty contest winner, and he's close to failing English. His English teacher ropes him into working on the school production of The Wizard of Oz for extra credit, appropriately enough as the understage controller of the fog machine. This gives him an opportunity to work with Maria Tressor, the most perfect girl in the school, on whom he has a rapidly intensifying crush. But it's a mixed blessing. When it's time to fog, Jacob, the consummate timing expert, flubs it badly, and in the confusion he blurts his feelings out to Maria. She says an astonishing yes to his feeble invitation for a date, and romance blooms because, she tells him, he's a winner. This brief, humorous look at adolescent life, complete with distorted self-concept, is a departure from the intensity of much of Paulsen's work, but is no less of a survival story in its own way. The novel is told mostly through a third-person narrative with little conversation until the end, which has the effect of distancing readers; it becomes a gently ironic fable of transformation and first love, in which many readers will find themselves. --Leda Schubert, Vermont Department of Education, Montpelier
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Gary Paulsen is one of the most honored writers of contemporary literature for young readers. He has written more than one hundred book for adults and young readers, and is the author of three Newberry Honor titles: Dogsong, Hatchet, and The Winter Room. He divides his time among Alaska, New Mexico, Minnesota, and the Pacific.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)
#47 in Books > Teens
#47 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I read this book in seventh grade, when I hated school and other people just like Jacob did, and thought it was one of the funniest books I'd ever seen. The part where the fog machine overheats had me in tears, I was laughing so hard. It was nice to read a book about an outcast who didn't wallow in self-pity and turn into one of those teenage trauma heroes. I would much rather read about a smart loser with a good sense of humor and an exploding fog machine than a *whining* loser. Shows there's some hope for us all in the world. (Especially in theater and stagecraft.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matt Hetling on January 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
Jacob is the high school student that we all remember, and sympathize with to some extent: the social misfit who is beneath the quirky geek clique; a kid who is so socially inept that he never speaks to anyone, and indeed spends most of his time and energy figuring out how to avoid conversation altogether.

The book follows Jacob as he maneuvers his way through a distant home life and a harrowing school life. One of the most beautiful girls in school takes note of him when he is assigned to operate the fog machine in the school play, but he is so smitten with her that his usual social awkwardness devolves into a tongue-tied panic.

The Good and the Bad:

I liked the character of Jacob, and I certainly remember a student or two in school who he reminds me of. The book does a good job of fleshing out that anonymous character, and giving us reasons that contribute to that type of personality. The writing is also engaging and fun, with funny descriptive metaphors that are sure to capture the imagination of many children. But I rate the book fairly low because it is presented as a realistic story, but many of the scenes are so unrealistic as to seem surreal, or at least borrowed from a low-budget made-for-tv comedy about the horrors of high school (thought the characters seemed more junior-highish to me). For example, when Jacob accidentally stumbles into a school bully, the bully promptly stuffs him into a locker without so much as a word. There are no pop culture references, no shades of nuance in most of the characters, and a series of stereotypes about the jocks who seem to make up the majority of Jacob's classmates. Also straining belief was Jacob's over-the-top clumsiness, which often left him sprawling around like a clown in front of a crowd of peers.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
A Kid's Review on May 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
I liked the book because it was funny. They also did a play of the Wizard Of Oz. This boy named Jacob secretly likes this girl named Maria Tresser. One of the funny parts is when Jacob is running and he trips and falls on Maria Tresser. It was funny because he trips on his shoelace on the pritiest girl in school.
one of the bad things is when you know that the girl in the story is going to say yes to go on a date. It is always boring when they live happily ever after. Why fdoesn't the story ever end in a sad ending or something. If I were you I would rent it first before I buy it because, it is only about 85 pages and 14 chapters long. Your kids might like it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
It's been a while since I read this, but I can remember reading it, and then rereading it, and then reading it again. This book is a one-afternoon book. You sit down and start reading, and then you finish the book without getting up. The main charachter is a reclusive boy who avoids other people, which is hard because he goes to school. You hear a lot about his popular model-in-training sister, and the lady who poured warm oil...
Pretty funny and an engaging read. Kind of corny in spots though.
Trevor
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
A Kid's Review on January 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
"The boy who owned the school"is about a boy named Jake.He has an "F" in English.The only way he can get a beter grade,is to work a fog machine in the school play "The Wizard of Oz".I think I have told plenty.The ending is awesome.If you want to find out what it is,read the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?