Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Boys from New Jersey: How the Mob Beat the Feds Paperback – April 1, 1995


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$50.84 $2.31

The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
This innovative and moving study illuminates how AIDS mourners—particularly in 1980s Ethiopia—grappled with the death of lovers and friends. Learn more | See similar books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 438 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press; Reprint edition (April 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813521548
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813521541
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #565,449 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In November of 1986, the federal government brought to trial 21 members of the Lucchese crime family, regarded by law enforcement officials as the Mafia group in charge of activities in northern New Jersey. Held in the Newark court of Judge Harold Ackerman, the proceedings featured V. Grady O'Malley as chief prosecutor and Michael Critchley as coordinator of the defense. Each of the accused was represented by a different attorney. In August of 1988 all of the defendants were found not guilty. Why? Rudolph, a reporter for the Newark Star Ledger , suggests that too many defendants were tried at the same time; that the case went on so long that the jurors became restive; that the defense succeeded in discrediting many of the mobsters who had become informants; that the judge did not exercise proper control; that "Fat Jack" DiNorscio, who usurped his lawyer and called himself "a comedian, not a gangster," turned the trial into a circus. Rudolph is a journalistic stylist of the highest order: his sentences and paragraphs are short, punchy and highly readable. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The case described here involved 20 alleged members of the Lucchese crime family led by Newark, New Jersey mob boss Anthony Accetturo. After a lengthy two-year trial, despite seemingly persuasive evidence, all the accused were acquitted of all charges, a rare victory for organized crime and an embarrassing loss for the government. Prosecution witnesses confessed to more heinous crimes than were charged against the defendants, which may have influenced the jury. Journalist Rudolph provides an anecdotal account, focusing on many humorous trial incidents, such as the antics of "Fat Jack" DiNorscio who was allowed to represent himself and made a mockery of the court. Although somewhat superficial, this book is readable and entertaining. Recommended for Mafia buffs.
- Gregor A. Preston, Univ. of California Lib., Davis
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
61%
4 star
28%
3 star
0%
2 star
11%
1 star
0%
See all 18 customer reviews
What a good story of the courtroom drama that truly did occur.
Shana M. Garrity
Certainly worth the read, slow to start but when the story speeds up its pretty hard to put the book down.
MR S Hall
Great story about Anthony Acceturo, Jackie DelNorciso and the Lucchesse Family.
Michael B from Rhode Island

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By MR S Hall on August 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
Certainly worth the read, slow to start but when the story speeds up its pretty hard to put the book down.
In a nutshell, the Feds put together what they think is a watertight case against Lucchese capo Anthony Acceturo's New Jersey crew, but get more than they bargain for when the case reaches the courtroom, due in no small part to Martin Taccetta's attorney, one Michael Crithley.(Taccetta being Acceturo's protege and successor).
In a case that made history in the US, droning on for almost 2 years, the Feds roll out ex cons who have been planted in the Witness protection programm to put an end to thier one time partners in crime, only for Crithley to shoot them all down in flames, questioning the governments double standards in letting off convicted murderers and drug dealers,if they cut a deal with them,which sometimes might make you think that its the Feds on trial and not the Mob.
One of the main characters in an out of sorts thug called Jackie Dinorsico, who represents himself in the trial, and somehow stumbles his way through the trial,upsetting anyone that stands in his path.(the Judge and fellow defense attorneys included),and quite often humouring them.
Not your typical Mob read but definetly worth it, just to find out how 20+ mafia members and hangers on somehow managed to convince 12 weary srangers that it was the US government and not themselves were the bad guys after all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By tony g on January 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
Forget about "The Sopranos" - this is the real thing -- The New Jersey mob at its gritty and funny best. I've read a lot of "true" crime stories, but this one had me turning pages with all the anticipation of a suspense novel -- while laughing at the real-life antics of "The Boys." It's a treat to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book nicely illustrates the powerful ways in which the modern mafia operates. It is an accurate account of how such an omnipotent organization avoids confrontations with the Feds, as well as ultimate prosecution. It is a gratifying, realistic and at times humorous book. It makes us come to the realization that the world is not what many have idealized it to be. With power, anyone can be a leader. This book is a MUST READ for anyone interested in modern organized crime!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
When a friend of mine gave me this, I expected it to be another cliche-ridden book about the mafia. Boy, was I wrong. This is a really good account of how a very smart criminal defense lawyer turned a can't lose prosecution into a victory for some very interesting -- and not so bright -- ordinary citizens who just happened to be members of organized crime. I'm surprised this book has been out so long without being picked up for treatment on the big screen, with somebody like Kevin Spacey as the defense lawyer and Anthony Hopkins as the judge. Good gift for lawyers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 40 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
The people who gave this book a five star rating must be related to the author -- or maybe its the author himself. Honestly, as someone who has read almost every mafia book out there, this book is just so so. People should know that it focuses almost all of its attention on the New Jersey court case and not on the street action. Its more about lawyers and the justice system than it is about criminals and the street.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. Harrison on May 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Although Anthony Acceturo doesn't endorse this book, records and witnesses back up Rudolph's story. Anyone who is a diehard fan of The Sopranos on HBO knows that the character of Tony Soprano is based Anthony Acceturo. Their fictional and nonfictional paths mirror one another to the present - except Acceturo is now free of the Mafia and a legit businessman.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
If you're still mourning the end of The Sopranos, The Boys from New Jersey will give you the fix you need. It's the non-fiction account of a mega mob trial that took place in Newark in 1986. Twenty-one members of the Lucchese crime family were tried, including class-clown Jackie "Fat Jack" DiNorscio and Michael Taccetta, rumored to be the model for "Tony Soprano." The defense attorneys, prosecutors, and defendants are as good if not better than similar characters you'd find in fiction, and the courtroom jockeying is fascinating. The events took place over twenty years ago, but this is a unique look into all aspects of a mob trial. If you like organized-crime stories or courtroom dramas, you won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By cv60 on April 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
Hilarious-----and True!!! Better written, better styled than anything written by Jimmy Breslin or Murray Kempton. If a movie was ever made, danny deVito would be the star. I know of no other book more widely read in law enforcement circles than this. I know one law sch prof who made it required reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: rutgers book store