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The Boys on the Tracks Perfect Paperback – December 10, 2007


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Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 370 pages
  • Publisher: Bird Call Press; 1st edition (December 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979189608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979189609
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #633,366 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If this Arkansas murder tale weren't a true-crime thriller by an established investigative journalist, it would be too crazy, complicated and bizarre to believe. The action grips readers from the beginning, with the death of two teenagers, Don Henry and Kevin Ives, told from the perspective of the train engineers who accidentally ran over the boys' bodies. The 1987 case was originally ruled a double suicide, then an accidentAthe boys supposedly smoked too much marijuana and passed out. But their bodies were suspiciously neatly arranged on the train tracks. The parents, rejecting the official explanations, pushed for a murder investigation. Leveritt tells most of the story through the eyes of Linda Ives, Keith's mother, who pursues the medical examiner, the sheriff, then-governor Bill Clinton, the CIA and everyone else she thinks is blocking or slowing the progress of the investigation. The case remains unsolved, and Leveritt draws no conclusions. She merely fleshes out the context and explores all the leads in all their various directions. Yet the further away from the murder she gets, the less compelling her story becomes. Leveritt brings up every wild conspiracy theory in Arkansas and ties each to the boys' death; some of the theories are wacky right-wing fantasies, others are simply small-town oddities. The result is that what should be chilling ends up seeming merely fantastical. (Nov.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This book documents a long and tangled criminal investigation that began in 1987, when Linda Ives's teenage son and his friend were killed by a train near Little Rock, AR. The deaths were ruled accidental. Not satisfied with that finding, Ives launched a series of investigations that eventually touched on the malfeasance of a prominent medical examiner, the misconduct of a local prosecutor, drug trafficking, and governmental corruption. The story, interestingly, unfolds against the backdrop of both the Arkansas and Washington Clinton administrations, so Clinton associates like Jocelyn Elders; Clinton's mother, Virginia Kelley; his brother, Roger Clinton; and Webster Hubbell pop up throughout the narrative. Leveritt, an award-winning investigative reporter, handles a mountain of details well and succeeds in making this convoluted story reasonably understandable. However, her intimation, in the epilog, of an ongoing, large-scale conspiracy is open to question. An optional selection for larger public libraries.APatrick Petit, Catholic Univ. Law Lib., Washington, DC
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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I couldn't put it down until I had read it from start to finish.
S Smith
The essence of Ms. Leveritt's story is the solvency of our system of justice, rule by the people vs. rule by a central government.
DELTA HEALTH WORKS INC
It is written in a way that gives a lot of details, weaves many facts, while keeping the readers interest.
Shirley Masaoka

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By S. A. Felton on April 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Many people are familiar with the story of the boys on tracks, first featured nationally on TV and then in the very anti-Clinton "Clinton Chronicles" video, which, despite some apparent inaccuracies, still contains a great deal of truth, and changed my own view of political corruption forever. The book "The Boys On The Tracks" is the real story of what happened in Arkansas, and is endorsed by Linda Ives, the mother of one of the boys who was killed and placed on the railroad tracks on that fateful night in August, 1987. Mrs. Ives is the central character in this book. The reader is presented with not only the entire story of the unfathomable corruption, but much of this incredibly detailed story is as if from Ives' diaries, written or mental.
The author, Mara Leveritt, takes the reader from the time the two boys are killed, through the complete story of what Ives goes through to try to find out the truth (and she still hasn't found the truth about what happened that night). First, we encounter the unbelievable and outrageous behavior and incompetence of the Arkansas State coroner, Famy Malek, who is protected countless times by top state officials despite absolutely false determinations he makes. Malek rules the boys deaths suicides from drug intoxication, and it takes the Ives family a long time to prove this false due to lack of cooperation from Arkansas officials. Only this is just the beginning of the obstructions of justice the
Ives face.
Then we see that, at least in part, practically the entire state of Arkansas's legal and law enforcement agencies are rampant with corruption, to the point that felons hold high-level positions in government and law enforcement.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Darryl Phillips on December 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book for everyone raising kids in today's society, everyone interested in the inner workings of law enforcement, and everyone interested in the "War On Drugs".
Fiction writers have it easy, they can limit their cast of characters. In real life, Mara Leveritt, Gary Webb, Terry Reed, and the others who have explored the CIA/cocaine connection found it's not so easy. The cast of characters is immense, many of their names are confusing, but real life is like that. (As you read the various authors, many of the same characters do keep popping up!)
I wanted to read "Boys on the Tracks" because I was flying my personal plane in and out of Mena during the same time period that Barry Seal and the CIA were importing drugs. I wanted to see whether Ms Leveritt's book rang true. It does. I have met a few of the characters and know of others. The facts in this book accurately reflect what I have personally observed.
Unlike "The Secret Life of Bill Clinton" by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, this is not an anti- Clinton book. Those who want to bash Willie will have to look elsewhere. But after looking elsewhere, when you need independent verification of what is fact versus what is only rumor, I hope you will read this book.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Lorri Davis on January 5, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Readers outside of Arkansas might have a hard time believing that the events this book describes actually happened. Unfortunately, they did, as those of us who live here know. Although Leveritt works for a competing paper, the statewide Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reviewed "The Boys on the Tracks" at length. The review did not challenge any of the author's facts. Rather, it said the account was "eye-opening" and described the book as "staightforward, engaging and extensively researched." The review also said the book "reads like a psychological thriller," and that it "lures you in and holds you hostage." I pass this on so that readers who are not familiar with the caliber of Leveritt's reporting will feel confident about ordering the book. You won't be disappointed.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mary Ruth Snapp (granny2four@webtv.net) on November 18, 1999
Format: Hardcover
From the first paragraph to the final page I was enraptured by the prose and how the writer made us one with the grief-stricken mother of one of the boys who was so brutally slain. Although the events occurred in Arkansas everyone in the country is effected by the cover-up just as we were by the Waco bombing and the government's effort to hide the truth.I highly recommend this as must reading for an insight into "the war on drugs".
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is one that the reader will not want to put down. An excellent overview of the events that occured in this case and the fact that there is little justice in Arkansas when high powered politicians are involved. The average person in this country doesn't believe these things happen, but after you read this book, the evidence is documented and plain to see.
Hopefully, someday these guilty persons will be held accountable for putting a family, a state and country through such a horrible tragedy.
It is time the American people opened their eyes to what is really going on in our country and to stand up against these powerful machines.
Mara did a great deal of research and documented all of her information and wrote a book about what an ordinary family has had to endure for 12 years and no one will listen to them and bring these people that committed and covered up such a cruel deed to justice. The Ives deserve an answer and if anyone knows anything about this event, they should try to put this nightmare to rest.
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