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The Bracelet School & Library Binding – November, 1996

17 customer reviews

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School & Library Binding, November, 1996
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

PW's starred review noted the "haunting immediacy" of this tale set in a Japanese American internment camp during WW II, adding that the "hushed, realistic paintings add to the poignancy of [the] narrative." Ages 5-up.
- narrative." Ages 5-up.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-5-It is 1942, and seven-year-old Emi is being sent from her home in Berkeley, California, to an internment camp with her mother and older sister. Her father was arrested earlier and incarcerated in a camp in Montana. Temporarily herded into stables at a race track with other Japanese-American families, Emi realizes that she has lost the bracelet that her best friend, Laurie Madison, gave her as a parting keepsake. At first desolate, she soon realizes that she does not need the token after all, as she will always carry Laurie in her heart and mind. Uchida employs a simple, descriptive style, allowing the child's feelings to give punch to this vignette without becoming sentimental. An afterword gives brief, dignified historical context to the story. Yardley's watercolor illustrations both match and amplify the text at every point, evincing the greatest sensitivity to the depiction of character and to historical accuracy. This deceptively simple picture book will find a ready readership and prove indispensable for introducing this dark episode in American history.
John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • School & Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback Books: A Division of Sanval (November 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0613235754
  • ISBN-13: 978-0613235754
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 8 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,709,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom on April 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
In the first illustration we see two typically Californian homes with cars in their driveways. One has a "For Sale" sign on its front steps. Emi, a second grader, sits and waits. Her father has been sent to a prison camp in Montana, and soon the FBI will take her, her sister, and her mother to a detention center and then to a detention camp in Utah. Emi and her family are Japanese Americans in California. It is 1942, and the United States is at war with Japan. Emi and 120,000 other Japanese Americans (80,000 of them citizens) were sent to detention centers due to their ethnic heritage by the U.S. government; their rights were abrogated. There is a knock at the door. Is it the FBI? No, it's her friend and neighbor Laurie. She gives Emi a gift, a bracelet, with which to remember her by. They hug. Emi and her family, allowed just a couple of suitcases, are sent with other from San Francisco to a racetrack which has been converted to a detention center. They see guards with guns and bayonets, and as they pass a boarded up grocery store, we see a sign in the drawing, saying that the store owners are "loyal Americans." When Emi loses the bracelet after arriving at the detention center, she learns that a person can remember people and families in the absence of physical items and personal effects. An afterword explains the historical events and the redress made by the US Federal government under Presidents Ford and Carter. Yoshiko is also the author of The Invisible Thread, her account of a childhood in detention.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Yoshiko Uchida writes of her experiences growing up during World War II living in California. Many of her works deal with the evacuation of Japanese Americans to internment camps away from the coastal areas. Although "The Bracelet" deals with the internment experience, the story has universal appeal because the theme is friendship. The young girl in the story is evacuated to a camp. Upon leaving, her best friend, who is Caucasian, gives her a bracelet. The young Japanese American girl loses this bracelet somewhere along her journey--it is not shown where. At the end of the story, the young girl realizes that you don't have to have material possessions to remember and maintain a friendship. True friendships transcend material belongings. The illustrations are especially nice and in full color throughout.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a must for any classroom library. The children in my classroom had fantastic and thoughtful things to say about this book, in third grade! This book deals with tough subjects and still has a beautiful moral.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By PWR on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this book to introduce my 10-year-old twin daughters to this bad time in our usually-praiseworthy US history. They were very moved by the story, identifying with Emi and her sadness and fear. In the story, the bracelet assumes the importance of a link to Emi's past; its importance lessens as difficult losses are suffered by Emi and the rest of her family. If you need to begin to address the topic of prejudice with your children, this story might be a sad yet somehow gentle way to begin.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 15, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful story about friendship. A young Japanese girl is sent to an internment camp. Before she leaves an American friend of hers gives her a bracelet to remember her by. When the bracelet is lost, the little girl is heart broken. Later she realizes that one does not need material objects to symbolize a friendship.
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By The Real on January 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
This historical fiction reading written by Yoshiko Yuchida might be a short story, but after reading it in just about ten minutes, it leaves a feeling just like that of after watching a two-hour movie. This educating masterpiece is enhanced with vivid photo-like illustrations by Joanna Yardley which depict history of Japan-Americans and friendships between their american friends and their helping neighbors during the Japan-American war. The story is based on appreciating the most important values in a person's life - family, friendship and freedom.
The "Bracelet" was given to the little japanese girl by her american school-friend to remember her by. The japanese family was helped to their destination by their american friends showing that racism doesn't exist among those who value loving bonds. And the revealing of government injustice being done should leave a person being grateful for where a person is right now, may be not in the richest environment but certainly not at the abandoned horse-housing unsanitary facilities like the Japanese-Americans have experienced during their exile.
The written language of the story is very logical and as such, is inducing logic thinking which is very crucial in a person's development. At the end of the book, somehow, the "The Bracelet" was lost and the girl was afraid that she had her memories of her dear friend gone with it. But something else was found and it was just as good as "The Bracelet" which makes one realize that a person can remember not by the things that are held in possession but by heart. And as long as one can still remember, the values will always be in possession. It's up to the individual to not destroy them.
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By margesmith65 on June 21, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been reading many books by Yoshiko Uchida because I was a very young child when my parents were evacuated to the relocation (concentration) camps during World War II. Most of the Japanese who were evacuated never talked about this sad part of their lives and it was sad. I'm a bit older now but wanted to learn more about the injustice suffered by the Japanese families. This book tells how children were affected and how some of their friends reacted. Because we were interrupted on such a short notice any child would have wanted Laurie Madison (the Caucasion child) as a friend as her Japanese friend, Emi, had to leave. This is another book that is good reading for the younger readers.
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