Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Disturbed $5 Off Fire TV Stick Labor Day Sale in Wine Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Baby Sale

The Art of Breaking

July 19, 2005 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:19
30
2
3:13
30
3
3:19
30
4
3:48
30
5
4:44
30
6
4:13
30
7
3:28
30
8
3:47
30
9
3:46
30
10
2:49
30
11
4:19
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 19, 2005
  • Release Date: July 19, 2005
  • Label: Tooth & Nail (TNN)
  • Copyright: (C) 2005 Tooth & Nail Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000SZGV6E
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,839 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Morales on March 6, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Don't get me wrong, TFK put out a great junior release. However, in order to appreciate it, you can't really compare it to TFK's two previous releases. The transition to Tooth and Nail, in my opinion, has led them a different direction... not necessarily a bad one.

A bit more "emo" than their earlier, edgy rap-rock, "The Art of Breaking" would appeal more to the screamo genre, than the rap-rock group. They have a few songs, like "Move", that make this transition a bit easier, since they resemble some of their earlier work.

The album is well-made: The quality is excelent and the sound is enormous. The music has changed some, however. The guitars are driven and the vocals are TFK, but, in my opinion, the beat that made Thousand Foot Krutch the band that it is just isn't there. The lyrics have become somewhat ambiguous and watered down... that's not necessarily bad, it's just not the TFK we knew.

To some, the change is a welcomed one and to others it's a bit too drastic. Personally, it was unexpected. On the first listen, I hated it, but I grew into it.

In conclusion, if you're expecting to hear the Thousand Foot Krutch that you knew in "Set it off" and "Phenomenon," don't. It's different, but not in an entirely bad way... you just have to take it for what it is: a decent album from an amazing band.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Masquerade on August 13, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I bought Art of Breaking a few weeks ago, simply because it was TFK. Though I have never heard any of the tracks from Set it Off, I do have Phenomenon, and I expected to hear something similar. What I did hear was a shock - TFK's style has changed further, though not in a bad way. Once I got over my initial surprise, I fell completely in love with this album.

This is one of those albums where you either hate it or love it, as proven by the other reviews. If you are open to their progression, I think you'll love it. Trevor's voice is evocative and powerful, and I think these new tracks have strong lyrics. TFK writes songs about other people's trials, as well as their own, and I was surprised at how many of their songs deal with relevant problems in a growing Christian's walk. Songs such as Stranger, Hurt, and Hit the Floor have deep, provocative lyrics. Every song refers to God in some way, even if the reference is not immediately obvious.

Absolute (9/10) While the style displayed in this song may repel some, I thought it did well to convey the message set forth in the lyrics. It seemed a little short to me.

Slow Bleed (9/10) This seems to be one of those songs designed to wake you up. I had just gotten used to Absolute when I was shocked again by the change in this song. I didn't like it immediately, but it grew on me. The lyrics are well thought-out, and I love the ending.

Art of Breaking (8/10) One of the more enigmatic songs. I'm still not entirely sure how to interpret it. However, I like the sound, and I'm beginning to come up with my own idea of what he's talking about.

Stranger (9/10) This song has so much that is relevant to any growing Christian's struggles.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alicia Nertinn on September 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I have to say that, while I've been a fan since "Set It Off" first released, this album is definately something that I could've done without. The lyrics are a bit hard to understand and the music seems... weaker. There's not a single track on this album that I'd recommend... they all begin to gain intensity, but fail to deliver somewhat. This is in comparison to their earlier stuff: "Set it Off" and "Phenomenon".

Now, if you take this CD for what it is, (for example, if this is the first time you're listenin to TFK, or didn't like the earlier stuff) it's actually very varied in terms of music. There's a little bit of everything. You can even hear traces of what they were before Tooth & Nail (Not that I have anything against them: I love Anberlin and Project 86 and many many bands on that label), it's just that TFK took a tun in a different direction and did it suddenly. To some, it's a welcomed change... to me, it's a sudden one; and, since I loved the old stuff, this new one is less appealing. Definately worth a buy if you like alterna-rapcore-in-an-attempt-to-be-screamo bands.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Stoltz on July 25, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Well...this first time I listened to this cd, I was honestly quite let down. This wasn't the TFK I was used to and loved. We all know Phenomenon rocks - but we pop this in and it's just - Different. The more I listen to this cd, the more I love it. I wouldn't say it's growing on me, I'd say that I'm getting over hoping for what used to be. What good is a band if they just play the same sounding songs over and over, on every album? Sure, they'd keep some of the fans that (obviously, according to other reviews) refuse to move beyond "Rawk Fist" - but they wouldn't be stretching themselves and reaching more of an audience - and that's what they are out to do. Reach people - not make sure all the old fans are happy. TFK rocks no matter what...regardless of the music, their purpose for doing it makes all the difference. This new album is different, yes - but take a minute to really listen to it and not just compare, and you'll find a new favorite. #11 is an wonderful love song to God, by the way - and it's my favorite. After the initial shock, you'll be glad you bought this cd - so don't think twice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?